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Discussion Starter #1
I've never gotten that much into arrows. I can tune a bow, broadhead tune, paper tune etc, but I've always gotten advice on arrows and when it came to fitting my bow I would simply read the manufacturers recommendation.

I shoot Mayhem 250's for my 60lb Answer. It's what is recommended on the box. I wanted them for hunting and possibly 3D. They work well. My questions come in when it comes to the different brands recommending different shafts. If I were to shoot more weight, like 70lbs, I should use a 350 for the Mayhem. However, when looking at some other manufacturers, they go the opposite direction. So a 500 arrow would be paired with a 40ish lb bow whereas a 300 arrow would be paired with a 60ish lb bow. Why? What does that number even stand for if it's not an industry standard?
 

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follow actual 'spine deflections' charts provided by manufacturers are suggested spine weights for bow poundage. http://www.huntersfriend.com/carbon_arrows/hunting_arrows_selection_guide_chapter_1.htm theres some good information here. some would grill you because tuning with an arrow thats not of a proper spine for your setup would give false indicators paper tuning. Im not saying you did that but its important to know spine deflection (dynamic) the one that matters most IMO changes with point weight & rear end weight. its an inexact science. goodluck hope that helps.
 

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You need to go research arrow spine, arrow defelction.

In short, spine is the stiffness of the arrow--which you probably already know...the heavier the bow you're shooting, the stiffer the arrow needed. This stiffness is rated based on deflection. This deflection is a measurement of the arrow movement when a 1.96# weight is suspended in the middle of an arrow that is supported at 2points 28" appart...the more deflection the weaker the arrow.

So, say you have an arrow that has a .350" deflection. This means that when supported, as mentioned and the weight placed in the middle, the arrow bends from straight, .350"...good for say a 65-75# bow.

Now, just because your arrows are called 350 or 200 doesn't mean that is their deflection or "Spine"...some companies have a generic numbering system so you need to referr to your manufacturers "ACTUAL DEFLECTION". For example, a PSE X-weave 100 is actuall a .500"ish deflection and a 200 is a .430"ish deflection.

a good place to get info is here
http://www.huntersfriend.com/carbon_arrows/hunting_arrows_selection_guide_chapter_3.htm
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the responses. I've always had my pro shop set up my arrows but I'd like to start doing this on my own as well.
 

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I wont post the site here... But I would Google "Carbon Arrow University" and use that as a start point.

Edit: Seems as if we are all pointing you in the same direction... Sorry for the repeat.
 

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I have stated for years that the ATA needs to step in an require shaft manufacturers to include on their label the actual spine deflection. Label them with any half baked name and/or number they want, but include actual spine deflection so that most people can compare on shaft against another.. There are just too many marketing gimmicks in this industry that keep people confused.
To date the only company that does so is Easton. Gold tip does so with their Ultralite series. There may be a few others now, but it needs to be an ATA standard.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
This ^^ would set me on the right path and I wouldn't have had the question in the first place. My main issue was the difference in comparing one a arrow to the next.
 

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Cummins Power
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It's a bad move by Carbon Express to use the naming conventions that they do...
 
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