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Discussion Starter #1
I noticed that since I've been shooting lower poundage to concentrate on form, I've been missing the quicker arrow flight to the target. Do longer draw length shooters have the advantage? I know they do in basketball. I have heard the argument where everyone says its all about form but it seems speed helps...
 

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The longer the DL the more and more they need higher brace bows to resist torque and add forgiveness. Not many bows today have the high brace heights needed to even the field.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The longer the DL the more and more they need higher brace bows to resist torque and add forgiveness. Not many bows today have the high brace heights needed to even the field.
Is that the same as the Greg Poole formula for forgiveness? I'm OK with the slower speed, I just miss the arrow getting there faster to make up for my bow arm movement. I just got my first long stab and it is incredible for holding on target!
 

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Your bow arm movement will have the same effect regardless of speed. There is not one single that anything design oriented that will make a faster bow easier to shoot. Nothing.
 

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sometimes speed does increase accuracy, for instance, in shooting distances that are unknown, if you misjudge a target by 2 yards with a bow shooting 240 fps your miss will be greater than if you are misjudging the same target by 2 yards and shooting 300 fps also the farther the distance is the bigger the miss.
so the answer is yes speed does matter, but only in certain curcumstances!
 

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Speed doesn't diminish accuracy. What does is how the speed is obtained. Cam designs, riser geometry, ata and limb design and lengths can change how easy a bow is to shoot repeatably. Longer draw length shooter have more options in picking a bow with better qualities for speed and shootability. Shorter draw length shooters can get away with certain designs that a longer draw length shooter might have trouble with. A longer draw length shooter needs different bow design requirements than a shorter draw length shooter does.
 

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Wind is a factor. Faster the arrow gets to the target, the less time the wind acts on the arrow.
The only way it will get there faster is to be lighter. I'll take the heavy and slow any day in wind and beat the light and fast.
 

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The only way it will get there faster is to be lighter. I'll take the heavy and slow any day in wind and beat the light and fast.
True, but lighter=(usually)thinner, which cuts down on cross sectional area. Theres a reason why people shoot X10s and not 27s outdoors.
 

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speed only comes into play when wind is involved and only with the lateral movement of the arrow. othewise speed has no impact
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I guess as long as you set your sight and gear up for accuracy regardless of speed it will still hit the X. I just have to accommodate for the drop at different distances. I just notice the advantage in those split seconds where your bow arm starts to drop a hair and with a faster arrow speed the decline will be a lot less magnified.
 

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True, but lighter=(usually)thinner, which cuts down on cross sectional area. Theres a reason why people shoot X10s and not 27s outdoors.
A 204 bullet travels much faster and is thinner than a 270. Which one will drift the most in the wind?
 

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You figure out just how much longer the arrow is in contact with the string on slow vs fast and get back to us. And no real radical difference in speeds either. Let's say 280 vs 330. And the bows have the same brace height.
 

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A longer draw length shooter needs different bow design requirements than a shorter draw length shooter does.
not neccesarily true. my DL is almost identical to my ATA (31" ATA & 30.5" DL) and i shoot my bow just fine out to 50 yards.
 

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It seems like the the faster bow, all other factors being equal, would result in the arrow being on the string for less time - and have less time for the shooter to torque the bow. I use my daughter's Genesis as a training aid. The arrow is on the string for an eternity. And the bow will shoot if your form is great. But it is really unforgiving.
 

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not neccesarily true. my DL is almost identical to my ATA (31" ATA & 30.5" DL) and i shoot my bow just fine out to 50 yards.
In archery, nothing is cast in stone. All one can go by is statisics. Shooting in the back yard can give different results than when under pressure in a tournament or facing a big buck in cold weather.
 
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