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I was hoping for a little more steadiness at longer ranges so I've been looking for a stabilizer extension. I didn't want to buy a new stab because the Fuse Axium that is on the bow (purchased with the bow in December) was about 60 bucks. I didn't wanna add weight, just extend the weight out to a useful distance.
So I grabbed a wristsling bolt (threaded male on one end, female on the other) and drilled the female end out to be the exact diameter of an old aluminum arrow that was laying around (a correctly threaded bolt with the head cut off and epoxied in would be even easier). Using a wire wheel, I removed all the anodizing from the shaft where it was to insert into the wristsling bolt. Put epoxy in the drilled hole and insert the arrow shaft firmly inside. Trim the arrow to the desired length and de-bur the inside and outside of the shaft. Now the tricky part... I used a long drift punch with a gradual arrow to slighty expand the very end of the shaft. Then I oiled the threads of an identically threaded bolt and begin to screw it into the shaft. You will have to put very firm pressure on the bolt to get it to start. Every couple threads, unscrew it and oil it again. (I don't think a thread tap would work because it would cut the shaft wall instead of expanding it)
All that's left to do is screw your dampener onto the shaft and the assembly into the bow. I made it last night, tried it this morning at 40 yards and noticed a great improvement in steadiness... 3 arrows, 3 bullseyes! -My 40 yard groups before were 8 in. diameter. Note, it might help to add "Hoyt" decal for luck. :wink:
stab2.jpg
 

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Nice. You could do something similar by tapping and threading a piece of aluminum rod. I will have to try this. Thanks.
 
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