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OK, this may be a dumb question, but I was always told that the only dumb question is the one you dont ask.... So here goes... What exactly does a stabilizer do?? I know they absorb vibration and stabilize, but why do some people use really long stabilizers and some use short or no stabilizer at all??? Is there a certain way a bow should balance in your hand?? Any tidbit of the infinite knowledge from you guys would be greatly appreciated
 

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my 2 cents...

A stabilizer helps reduce the effects of bow torque during a shot. Longer stabilizers put more weight and mass out front to resist the tendency of a riser to "yaw" left or right when you release. I think a lot of guys add weight by using longer stabilizers and rear-facing v-bars to "center" the weight of the bow at the grip point...if the weight is centered on the grip and the stabilizer(s) can control the vibrations, the bow's tendency to want to move itstelf from the shooter's grip in any direction is lessened. A lot of shooters probably nullify the effects of $200 worth of stabilizers by having a bad grip that works against the bow instead of with it.

A little extra weight is easier for me to hold steady.

A lot of the vibration reducing stabilizers by Simms, Limb Saver, etc absorb the vibration on your average hunting bow. Also probably helps quiet those bows.

Probably not covering everything, and I am no pro.......

AW
 

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koosh said:
OK, this may be a dumb question, but I was always told that the only dumb question is the one you dont ask....
Great - how much do my armpits weigh? :D

So here goes... What exactly does a stabilizer do??
The above poster answered that fairly well. Basically reduces the effects of torque and absorbs vibration. Though you already knew that...

but why do some people use really long stabilizers and some use short or no stabilizer at all???
Well, there are three main reasons. First is length - a 3 foot stabiliser isn't too good up a tree and a deer 5 yards from you. Second a three foot stabiliser is illegal in most hunting classes. Lastly, well, some people have individual ideas - these can really be anything. Really, the long ones usually do better than the short ones, the short ones are more versatile. Not always true (is anything in archery always true?) but usually so.

Is there a certain way a bow should balance in your hand??
Yes, however is comfortable to you. I like a slow forward roll, my father likes no roll, my ex-boss likes a hard front roll. This is where a long target stab really shines - you can usually get it to balance out all the other heavy junk you add in and exactly to your preferance.

Any tidbit of the infinite knowledge from you guys would be greatly appreciated
WHOA THERE - my knowledge is very finite in archery. I just felt compelled to post the armpit question and didn't want to be seen as making fun of you so you get the rest of my ideas. It always run through my mind after a friend of mine complained about a prof saying "there are no dumb questions" and used that as example - yes there are :)
 

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Re short/long: one half of the weight at twice the distance will balance a bow the same.
 

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They have the name "stabilizer" for a reason. They get the moment of inertial out away from the bow and help stabilize your aiming. This is really noticible with a magnified lens. The longer the stabilizer, the more tendancy it has to resist movements and it will slow the period of any movements. They are also used for balancing, but that is a weight distribution thing. The side affect is felt vibration reduction, which has very little to do with the shot. I think that some hunting model stabilizers have turned into nothing more than vibration reducing gizmos. Some (like the Tranquilizer) are so light, they have almost no affect on the stability of the bow at full draw.
 

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Lou & Jode
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koosh said:
OK, this may be a dumb question, but I was always told that the only dumb question is the one you dont ask.... So here goes... What exactly does a stabilizer do?? I know they absorb vibration and stabilize, but why do some people use really long stabilizers and some use short or no stabilizer at all??? Is there a certain way a bow should balance in your hand?? Any tidbit of the infinite knowledge from you guys would be greatly appreciated
Compare it to walking a tight rope-would you like a 6' balance pole or a 12'er?
The longer they are the more they aborb and stabilize before and during the shot.
 

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as others have been said, a longer rod allows more leverage with less weight so an 8 ounce Beiter or Doinker long rod is going to be more effective than say an 8 ounce ball of lead like some barebow shooters use to meet FITA 12.2CM rule.

the beiter and the new doinker multiple rods have more surface area which absorbs more vibration-the old metal rods merely stabilized through weight and leverage-that is why people used TFC coupings-the carbon jobs with the plastic joiners actually absorb vibration.

most compounds don't need as much "backweight" as recurves because you have the wheels behind the pivot point-recurves have far less weight behind your wrist. I tend to pick a stabilizer that makes it handy to rest the bow on at the line :D

In FITA Field, I go a little shorter for maneuverability
 
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