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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking at getting a stab setup for my bow. In looking at different offerings it appears to be a drastic price difference in bstinger vs "lower end" companies.
Is this just brand name/advertising or is there really a difference in types of carbon rods and machining?
 

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A lot of people will tell you it is the quality of carbon. The higher quality carbon the stiffer the bar, meaning it can handle more weight without bending. According to Bee Stinger this means that your bow will aim quicker. I'm sure that there is a component of advertising and marketing into this cost but they do make good stabilizers.
 

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I've talked with Robin Hall of Doinker about this in the past. He told me the higher prices are because of the higher quality of carbon being used and the stiffer bar being the result. But, he also said depending on the weight you plan to run and the length of the bar, it may not always be necessary to use a super high end bar.

The aiming part that was talked about by WCH is correct. A stiffer bar will not bob up and down as much as you get to anchor and holding at full draw. That allows you to get on target and settle in quicker. But, there again, depending on the weight and length of bar, you may or may not notice that affect.
 

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If you looking for a nice stabilizer set, check out Vendetta Archery "Smoke City", some really nice stabilizers that come with 14oz of weight. They are also 30% off right now. http://www.vendettaarchery.net/product.php
 

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A lot of people will tell you it is the quality of carbon. The higher quality carbon the stiffer the bar, meaning it can handle more weight without bending. According to Bee Stinger this means that your bow will aim quicker. I'm sure that there is a component of advertising and marketing into this cost but they do make good stabilizers.
It's true to a certain extent.
To visualise this, just like the effect of arrow spine or front of center, I like to imagine the physically impossible extremes and how the arrow/stabilizer would react.

So, imagine a very soft stabilizer that's made out of rubber. You draw the bow back, you bring it on target, the end with the weight swings around, left, right, up, down and it'll take some time of holding the bow perfectly still until the weight settles down.
Obviously in real life, the end of the stabilizer isn't swinging, it's mildly vibrating.

Another thing to keep in mind is how the bow sits and what the stabilizers do to keep that bow there.
Again, imagine the same soft rubber rod as your stabilizer and, another extreme, imagine how it reacts if someone hits the bow.
The bow itself will move quite a bit before the weights at the end of the soft tube will react and follow.
Now imagine a immensively stiff rod. You will have to move ALL of the weight plus the leverage that a long stabilizer gives you because the transition from the bow to the end of the stabilizer is immediate.


As far as the quality in machining and whatnot, I can't tell you, I never took the chance with a cheap stabilizer because with sights, releases, bows, arrow rests, arrows, it has never paid off to buy something cheap in the beginning and upgrade it later.
Now I always go for something high quality. Not always the most expensive, but there are certain brands like Cartel which I won't buy anymore and would only recommend if you are on a very tight budget.

And as always, check the classifieds.
Stabilizer companies seem very willing to get a lot of new staff shooters, I've seen a bunch of cheap Doinker, Fuse or B-Stinger sets for sale because some other smaller stabilizer company offered them a staff membership and they have no more use for their old stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It's true to a certain extent.
To visualise this, just like the effect of arrow spine or front of center, I like to imagine the physically impossible extremes and how the arrow/stabilizer would react.

So, imagine a very soft stabilizer that's made out of rubber. You draw the bow back, you bring it on target, the end with the weight swings around, left, right, up, down and it'll take some time of holding the bow perfectly still until the weight settles down.
Obviously in real life, the end of the stabilizer isn't swinging, it's mildly vibrating.

Another thing to keep in mind is how the bow sits and what the stabilizers do to keep that bow there.
Again, imagine the same soft rubber rod as your stabilizer and, another extreme, imagine how it reacts if someone hits the bow.
The bow itself will move quite a bit before the weights at the end of the soft tube will react and follow.
Now imagine a immensively stiff rod. You will have to move ALL of the weight plus the leverage that a long stabilizer gives you because the transition from the bow to the end of the stabilizer is immediate.


As far as the quality in machining and whatnot, I can't tell you, I never took the chance with a cheap stabilizer because with sights, releases, bows, arrow rests, arrows, it has never paid off to buy something cheap in the beginning and upgrade it later.
Now I always go for something high quality. Not always the most expensive, but there are certain brands like Cartel which I won't buy anymore and would only recommend if you are on a very tight budget.

And as always, check the classifieds.
Stabilizer companies seem very willing to get a lot of new staff shooters, I've seen a bunch of cheap Doinker, Fuse or B-Stinger sets for sale because some other smaller stabilizer company offered them a staff membership and they have no more use for their old stuff.
Great write up. Thank you for clearing it up
 
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