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Jack Wallace said in Bow Junky's video where he was setting up Jason's bow that basically when you're aiming and your sight picture is moving sideways you have to add weight to the front stabilizer while if your sight picture is moving up and down then you need to load the rear bar, and Griv also explains it like that in his articles.
Yesterday evening though I tried to play a little bit with the weights and when I loaded the back bar instead of decreasing my vertical movements, it slowed my left and right movements.
My setup before was a 33 inch front rod with 6 ounces and a 15 inch back bar with 8 ounces and my sight was going in a circle around the centre and I could only get it to stop for a brief period of time. So basically what I did yesterday was to put a bit of an angle downwards and slightly out to my back bar that previously was just straight back, as Jack said in the video, and I put 12 oz at first, but still my sight was going all over around the 9-ring and then settling for a bit. So I tried to add 3 more ounces to the back and I got it to 15oz. The result was that it feels great and now my left and right movements are pretty much none but I still move up and down.

So, my actual question is why adding weight to the back bar slowed down my sideway movements instead of the vertical ones? And what should I do? I just keep adding weights to the back bar until those are "gone" too?

Thanks in advance to anyone that will take the time to help out :)
-Enrico
 

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U should be pretty close to 1:3 ratio. For every one ounce on the front u should have about 3 ounces on the back.. Hope this helps and God bless..
 

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Did the same experiment for the past couple days ended up with 21 oz on the back bar
I know nothing about this, but he also mentioned the ratio in the video. Could you reduce/increase the amount of total weight, but keep the same ratio? Or drop the end of your rear bar so it points more towards the ground? Again, I don't know. Mostly trying to answer a question with question...
 

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Length of back bar makes a difference. I've notice some, like Levi and others, have back bars almost touching them.... Longer and the same weight on the end increases leverage.

I've just started. Said was to build up and find what works, so 30" stab with 1 1/2 oz out front, 10" rear bar with 4 oz. And a supply of weights.
 

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Its not hard to do and I don't fully agree with what jack said because my experriments have proven different. I could have also misunderstood what he said.

If you have your back bar and your front bar straight. They will resists the side to side movment but your bow will twist in the limb tips like a clock This can also look like side to side movment but its not.

Two much back weight for me will give me the up down movment Jack was talking about. Two much front weight will also do the same because I'm fighting to keep the weight up.

The first thing that must be done to a bow to get it to slow its movement is to take all weight off and get your draw length set correct. Do this with the release your going to shoot. If its a hing set the hing so it won't fire. You want to see the float.

I personally like like a ten degree front bar and a back bar with at least the same degree down angle as the front. This does a few things. It gets the weight lower so the bow wants to resists the tips of your limbs from rotating like a clock. It keeps you from seeing the movement in your front bar. It keeps the back bar from hitting you in the arm or arm pit.

I just set the side bar angle so I don't fight my bubble.

Angle down bars will need more weight than a straight bar to resist side to side movment

I like to take and balance the bow so the riser is verticle. A balanced bow will feel light. So this allows me to pack the weight on.

Once I get to a certain point the bow will just feel to heavy and you will shake trying to hold it up. You may also get a bow that gets big wide movement. Just back the weight off so its as heavy as you can handle then play with the tip weight. All you want to do is slow it as much as you physically can.

My bows end up with a slightly front heavy feel. Meaning the riser doesn't sit verticle like I started out.

I run a 33" bar in front 10 deg down with 12-13oz depending on my hold for the day. My back bar has about a ten or fifteen degree down angle its 15" with 21 oz. Im not a pro but my bow has very little movement. I use a 6x lense and 2 power clarifer and I can keep my dot inside the ten ring on most of my shots.
 

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There are more things that influence pin movement many much more then stabilizer set up. If you are adjusting weights on your stabilizers and getting same results then its not the stabs. DL being incorrect can influence pin movement much more then stabilizers. I have seen many guys loading their stabilizers with tons of weight to mask their dl problem. I have been working on my set up and my goals were to reduce pin movement to a minimum and also get the set up that allows it to be that steady for the longest period of time. I could get my bow really steady putting 10 oz out front and 30oz out back but it would only remain steady for a second before the weight wore me out. You get my point. Have to find that balance. Like the guy I shoot with says who is a consistent 60x shooter if the bow doesn't want to aim naturally and the pin wants to just sit in the middle for a while then something in the setup needs changing. Don't make it harder on yourself then it needs be, find what works for you by trying it all.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
First of all thanks to everybody who posted :)
Then I will also try to post as soon as possible a photo to figure out if my form also needs some adjustments before touching the weights.
 

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I think what woks for one person may not work for another. Heck, what might work for a thousand other people might not work for you.

After weeks of playing with stabilizer weights, I found what works for me.

2 ounces on 30" front bar and 4 ounces on a 12" side bar. THEN, I put 3 ounces of weight on the very bottom of the riser to reduce any top-heavy feeling.

I think you just need to keep experimenting to find what will work best for you.
 

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it's the balanced input of holding weight, mass weight of the entire rig, front weight and back weight, against your personal physiology, that controls float. there is not one specific element that works more, or has more input, than the other. a change in each element will change the input of another, so it's very unlikely, that a single change will affect a specific issue that you are having. there are structured orders of procedure, that can be used to arrive at the best conditions, as N&B demonstrates, but the likely hood on just one small adjustment being the "magical solution", is rare.
 
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