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Discussion Starter #1
So I was shooting my sage samick yesterday and I was at full draw then when I released the loop on the string broke :mg: It made a weird clattering sound, i checked the limbs and they looked fine, No noticeable visible damage. I just want to know if that's equivalent to a dry fire or if my bows ok. Also does anyone have suggestions on a stronger string?
 

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Civil but Disobedient
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Any time you put an inordinately large amount of energy into the bow instead of the arrow it is some sort of "dry fire".

Keep an eye on the bow. A few things to look for are:

Increased noise that requires re-tuning to quiet
Changes in tiller over time
Unexplained performance changes (easiest to see with a chrono but you can also look for sight point changes)
Physical defects and things that don't sound right.

Are you removing your string when you are done shooting? If not, you may not notice end loop wear. End loops are a weak link on any string since they have big bends and touch the bow.
 

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Slingin' Arrows
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You have a loop on a sage? Most folks shoot fingers from that bow. Loops and release aids are generally reserved for compounds.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Any time you put an inordinately large amount of energy into the bow instead of the arrow it is some sort of "dry fire".

Keep an eye on the bow. A few things to look for are:

Increased noise that requires re-tuning to quiet
Changes in tiller over time
Unexplained performance changes (easiest to see with a chrono but you can also look for sight point changes)
Physical defects and things that don't sound right.

Are you removing your string when you are done shooting? If not, you may not notice end loop wear. End loops are a weak link on any string since they have big bends and touch the bow.
There was an arrow on the string
 

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halt -

Yeah, ya had a dry fire. Deal with it.
Most production bows can handle more dry fires than you can.
Don't get me wrong, it's never a good thing, but most production bows are sufficiently over built that aside from you being a little shaken, no harm done.

Still, visually and physically examine all glue joints, especially at the tips.
Optimally, you would want to do that with the bow unstrung, strung and at full draw (with the help of a friend).
It's more for your sanity than the bows'.

More importantly would be why the string broke.
Failures do occasionally "spontaneously" happen, but more often there's a cause.
If the string wasn't abused, the bow is most like to blame. A sharp bend below the string nock or an incipient delamination (separating of the fiberglass or wood layers) cutting the string.

Posting a photo of the string may help diagnose the cause.

Viper1 out.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
it was the original string i've used for about a year, before I shot i thought it looked a little sketchy but i hadn't been able to shoot for a few weeks so i shot anyways. Lesson learned, thanks for the input, I'll keep an eye on the bow to make sure but i think it's fine.
 

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Halt -

The original strings of the Sage was (IIRC) 16 strand Dacron, but I could be mistaken.
If that's correct, that should handle at least 75#, so the fact that it "broke", or rather why it broke, might be something to look into.

Viper1 out.
 
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