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New to string building. Built a few for friends and family. There fed back has bing good. If I would start building strings for others. Would you need liability insurance? What I am asking is what should I be doing to do this as a side business. Any feed back would be great.
 

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I would think you'd want some sort of insurance... to protect you and your family should a string fail and injure someone.
 

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I would definitely look into insurances for yourself. Not only if someone were to get hurt but also if a bow were to blow up with your strings on it. I’m sure there’s some people out there that would be outraged and in this day and age it wouldn’t surprise me if someone tried to take legal action knowing your not a big cooperation. Best of luck
 

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Would it even make financial sense? How long does it take you to make one string/cable set, and what's the material cost on average? How much over both tangible and intangible cost (time potential for other things) would you charge to provide padding on returns, mishaps, and equipment replacement/upgrade? How much is your time worth to you? Do you have more than one jig, and if not, how would you handle multiple orders coming in at once?
 

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Totally unrelated but sort of similar. I used to make slabs (casting spoons). I had a large order from Gander Mountain and they required me to have 1 million dollars in liability insurance before I could be placed in their stores.

I would absolutely recommend insurance, either set yourself up as a DBA or better yet incorporate. If you incorporate "they" can typically only go after your business and not your personal liabilities. If you do a DBA, typically your persona stuff is at risk. When I had my business, I had nothing but student loan debt, so I had a DBA.

Cheers,
-M
 

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I started building strings last year. Insurance is a must. It runs me about $1k per year. Then you have FET....not terrible but its a piece of the pie.

I started out with a baker jig and realized that serving by hand wasn't for me....too time consuming. I bought a used Super Server 800 for about $2200. With the compressor and strut I was in it for about $3000.

I only build for bows in my shop. No desire to sell only strings as its a cut throat market with many players.

I'm coming up on 1 year since I made the investment in the SS800, but it has already paid for itself. It was the best decision I made. I can now build for my own clientele and it keeps money coming in during the "off" season.
 

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Yes,
Insurance, better think about 2 mil
Business lic
Sales tax permit
Correct zoning for business, where you plan to make strings.
The FET tax on all archery gear
I'm sure there's more
Ain't business fun!
 

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What if they were simply sold as limb tension retention devices, not intended for, or marketed as, bow strings. Would that be subject to FET? :D
 
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What if they were simply sold as limb tension retention devices, not intended for, or marketed as, bow strings. Would that be subject to FET? :D
You could call it whatever you want, if it is attached to a box it is taxed.......ole Uncle Sam may not be too bright in some areas, but when it comes to collecting tax he doesn't miss a beat......
 

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You could call it whatever you want, if it is attached to a box it is taxed.......ole Uncle Sam may not be too bright in some areas, but when it comes to collecting tax he doesn't miss a beat......
Man. Your smarter than I remeber. Lol
 

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What if they were simply sold as limb tension retention devices, not intended for, or marketed as, bow strings. Would that be subject to FET? :D


Or, nock ear separators; don't mention bows at all. Then it becomes an arrow accessory, or even a nock accessory, ad not a bow accessory.

In the fine print of advertising you could "suggest" off-label uses.
 
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