Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,997 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have seen posts about making two color strings where it was suggested that one color could be twisted in the opposite direction from the other color and then the two colors put together and twisted for form the string. This sounds like it would work good but when I tried it I could see very quickly that the twists in one color was increasing and the other color was unwinding as I twisted the two together. So does anyone use this technique?

Also I looked at some 452X under a microscope trying to see if there was any natural twist to its fibers and the best that I could tell the fibers run parallel with no natural or initial twist. Can anyone verify my findings?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,426 Posts
I'm curious about this as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
Dont quote me on this but i believe you have to twist one and the other has to be the opposite way for it to be able to hold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,997 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
The only way that I can think of that will keep the two string colors twisted equal amounts in the opposite direction would be to secure both colors at one end and then hold the other two ends separate from each other and then wrap them together making sure that you do not allow the individual ends to be rotated. This just does not seem worth the effort because after the ends are served together you will probably have to make some final twisting adjustment once the string is put on the bow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,426 Posts
I know what you are saying and that is the only way I can see as well. Most of the strings I make have very little peep rotation so I'm not too worried about this method but I'm always open to ideas. I do know that Mathews Barricuda strings pioneered the method you are discussing and honestly I'm not too impressed with their strings (many have initial peep rotation). The most important method of controlling peep rotation is a) use a string jig that locks positively in a 90 degree position and b) wrap the two seperate colors with equal tension around the posts (this is the hard one). I also find stretching and burnishing before serving helps as well as not serving too tightly. All this and practice, practice, practice. Experience and consistancy are what makes a good string maker.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top