Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
398 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just ordered some Easton X7 cobalts in 2613. I see glue in target points offered in a variety of different weights and I am wondering what will work best for shooting spots with my setup. I shoot a Quest Primal 29", 70# draw. I ordered the cobalts so I can use my FOBs with a target arrow. How many grains should I put on the front to have the correct spine?? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
398 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Anyone??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
398 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
ttt need some advice guys!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
398 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I'm thinking about using the 150 grain nibb points-- is that too light?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
398 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Sounds good, Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,431 Posts
You might consider investing in software that can be used to design arrows. There are three very good programs available. Archers Advantage, On Target 2 & TAP.

All of them will give you a starting point for deciding on arrow selection, point weight, fletching & arrow length.

They are excellent for teaching you the factors that go into designing an arrow for a specific purpose.

Allen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,506 Posts
are you gonna be shooting that bow at the max 70lb's ???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,550 Posts
You might consider investing in software that can be used to design arrows. There are three very good programs available. Archers Advantage, On Target 2 & TAP.

All of them will give you a starting point for deciding on arrow selection, point weight, fletching & arrow length.

They are excellent for teaching you the factors that go into designing an arrow for a specific purpose.

Allen
That's what I used to come up with the numbers I did. I really like the program.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
398 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the input, guys. I like the idea of getting some software, is it downloadable through a website, or do I need to purchase a CD-ROM or something? I plan to keep shooting at the full 70 pounds, been shooting that way all (indoor) season, and seem to hold steadier with a little more holding weight. Also borrowed 6 used cobalts tonight from a guy in the league, 33" unknown point weight (I'm guessing 150) plan to try them tomorrow night to see how they do, and then set up my own. I don't see many 200 grain points available for the 2613 though, even on the Lancaster's site. Where do you guys buy your glue-in points?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
398 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the link. Cool program -- now I can quit bugging you guys about that.:tongue:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,076 Posts
Easton Shaft Selector

Before you buy any software, give the Easton Shaft Selector a try. It is free to be downloaded from the Easton site: http://www.eastonarchery.com/software
Once you have installed it, enter your bow weight, and leave the arrow length and point weight at their default settings. Next click the Target tab to view Easton Target Arrows. Here's the screen shot.

Shaft Selector 1.jpg

The display shows the range of Easton Target arrows which would be in the acceptable range as properly spined for your bow.
If you change the point weight and/or arrow length, the recommended arrow size will change. For example, take two inches from the arrow length, and the arrow will be too stiff and the 2612 falls off the chart.

Shaft Selector 2.jpg

This will give you a place to start. I recommend building one arrow, then checking the FOC. Measure your arrow's length, mark it's center, then balance and use the FOC Calculator included in the program. You want the FOC to be between 10%-15% to start, and you can tune from there if you wish. PDP makes adjustable point weight points which will allow you to fine tune your point weight. Small variations in point weight probably won't change the arrow recommendation based on the spine, but can make a significant difference in FOC.

The software recommendations others suggest are all good, and will allow you to factor in greater detail, but this is free, and will get you close enough to get good results. Ultimately, and this applies to all the archery software; experiment, as the only important result is what works for you and your equipment. Try changing FOC and see how arrows group. This is a handy reference and makes it easy to visualize how changes in draw weight, arrow length, point weight and arrow spine relate to each other. Also, while you're on the Easton site, download their arrow tuning guide. It contains a great deal of good information. If you are new to arrow building, it may take a while for some of it make sense. In time though, it will. Tuning your arrows is every bit as important as tuning your bow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
398 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I downloaded the trial version of on-target, I think I will use 150 grain points and cut my arrow at 33" based on my calculations. The program is really cool because it allows you to make the perfect spine adjustment by changing arrow length. Thanks again for all the input!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
644 Posts
UHH at 70lbs id cut those arrows to 28.5 inches shoot 200gr points and throw those FOBs out the window and put 4" vanes on them. Go to any spot shoot and you will never see an FOB on an arrow. They are designed for the hunter not for the shooter who plans on shooting 60xs. With a fat shaft you need a long fletching to control it especialy when the arrow starts to flex. When shooting target its not logical to shoot 70lbs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,431 Posts
Please explain why........ I.e getting tired from pulling 70lbs. 60 times?
Indoors, there is no advantage of 70 lbs over a lighter draw weight. However, there are a couple of disadvantages. Fatigue, shoulder damage and on some ranges, it's more difficult to pull your arrows from the back stop if you pound them in with a 70# DW. I had this last problem this weekend with my 55# bow. I'm glad that I wan't shooting a heavier DW.

Getting good at shooting indoor usually requires a huge number of practice shots. Shoulder damage comes from the simple wear and tear like any repetitive stress injury. Lower draw weights don't eliminate this, but will help reduce it a bit.

Remember, for indoor, you just need enough draw weight to clear the ceiling and stick in the target. Plenty of archers are shooting under 40#'s for indoor.

JMHO,
Allen
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top