Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,256 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Is it just me or do most target shooters shoot fixed rests? So my question is if dropaways are better why don't more pros use them for target archery?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,934 Posts
Who said drop away are better?
And most pros don't pay for their gear....and they've always shot blades, it's what they know and what they're used to.
Simple as that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,256 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Everyone says dropaways are better don't have to worry about fletching contact and such. Just a question I was wondering about
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
I am just starting to dabble In 3D more seriously and from everyone has told me it’s a consistency situation. IE: if your cord breaks or moves on a drop away you could be In a pickle. If your blade breaks simply replace it. Someone more seasoned is welcomed to correct me just what I have heard.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,934 Posts
Everyone says dropaways are better don't have to worry about fletching contact and such. Just a question I was wondering about
Not everyone, just those that are used to them.
A properly setup blade doesn't have to worry about vane contact either.
Again, what you're used to and comfy with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,755 Posts
I actually find a limbdriven more forgiving.
I prefer the LD Micro on my target setups.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
(aka lug nut)
Joined
·
48,345 Posts
Everyone says dropaways are better don't have to worry about fletching contact and such. Just a question I was wondering about
Drop away arrow rest is DEAD simple to tune. Better for the beginner shooter. Blade can be a real pain in the butt to tune, but once you figure out how...the results are amazing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,755 Posts
Drop away arrow rest is DEAD simple to tune. Better for the beginner shooter. Blade can be a real pain in the butt to tune, but once you figure out how...the results are amazing.
No real difference for me as they both bareshaft tune just fine. The difference comes in on your bad shots. For me a bad shot with a Blade is magnified more than a limb driven


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,934 Posts
The difference comes in on your bad shots. For me a bad shot with a Blade is magnified more than a limb driven
I can't say a blade is any more or less forgiving due to a bad shot...since it is a bad shot begin with...lol.
My bad shots are a result of my incorrect shot execution and I can't narrow down a single piece of gear I use that could make that better or worse.

That being said, Shane, I don't claim to shoot anywhere near your level.
So...with a grain of salt as they say.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,755 Posts
I can't say a blade is any more or less forgiving due to a bad shot...since it is a bad shot begin with...lol.
My bad shots are a result of my incorrect shot execution and I can't narrow down a single piece of gear I use that could make that better or worse.

That being said, Shane, I don't claim to shoot anywhere near your level.
So...with a grain of salt as they say.
Agreed, a bad shot is a bad shot but I’m referring to a bad shot as a 10 and not an X or a 9 and not a 10.

For me, I just find a little more forgiveness not going with a blade.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,256 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I hunt and shoot 3ds for fun. That said I always want to have the most accurate setup. I use to shoot a bodoodle years ago and shot great now I shoot a drop and shoot well but was just sitting here wondering
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,934 Posts
Jacob,
Simply no way I'd use a blade for hunting.
But here are guys who use hinge/back tension for hunting as well, which is not my cup of tea!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,256 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Yea no blade was thinking bodoodle as I used it in the past no big deal just bored lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,910 Posts
I think it's all a mental game, and if you think an extra mechanical device is going to help you execute your shot better, then it just might.

There are a few justifications for a dropaway rest that I have heard/read. One was vane clearance (which shouldn't be an issue anyway.). Another is that they should be more "forgiving" because it only guides the arrow long enough to establish its path, and should be less susceptible shooter input or form inconsistencies.

However, I have also heard the argument in favor of a limb driven dropaway rest vs a cable driven dropaway rest that directly contradicts that argument and states that a limb activated rest is more accurate because it takes longer to drop. So (aside from using a simpler mechanism) it's better because it guides the arrow through a longer percentage of the release.

So which one is it, and why wouldn't it be better to just have the rest guide the arrow a little bit longer with a fixed rest?

I think it's all of above, and it's none of the above.

Set them up properly, put the bow in a shooting machine, and they will just about put the same arrow repeatedly in the same spot.

Now insert the human factor.

The placebo effect is so powerful that medical studies always have to account for it because the human mind simply believes something is happening, and the body follows suit.

Ever lift weights with a spotter and he/she hovers their hands under the bar without touching it, and all of the sudden the weights felt lighter?

In summation, use whatever you "think" is going to get you the best results, and then focus on executing your shots consistently. If you practice the latter religiously, you will have a made a self-fulfilling prophesy, because the former will not have mattered (assuming you set it up properly and it is functioning properly.)

I use Firenock Aerorest Micro-Adjusts on all my bows. It's a fixed rest, full containment, no cords, no mechanisms, built solid, and it won't wear out in my lifetime. I have no intentions of blaming it for a poorly placed arrow. That responsibility falls on me.


Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
I’ve shot both and can’t say I have a preference. Shooting a blade now and I think it takes some potential problems out of the system. On the other hand I’ve had a loose screw on a blade that created a problem. I expect I’ll continue with a blade because wear issues are probably less and replacement is easy. More stuff to go wrong with a drop away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
I prefer a blade. Maybe it's the sound. Maybe it's the simplicity in looks and set up.

My son prefers a drop away. Maybe it's the (different) sound. Maybe it's the simplicity. He thinks it is more forgiving, and it certainly easier to draw when feeling a little fatigued.

Either one when set up properly is certainly more accurate than the human...
 

·
Socket Man
Joined
·
23,756 Posts
I shot a limbdriver starting in 2009 and this summer in july I picked up a new hamskea hybrid pro and am now using it. Overall both of them were equally accurate and were easy to tune and have little to no maintenance required.

I did get a blade rest about 4 years ago and I shot it for about half a year, it was a really nice one. The spot hogg edge. Overall it gave no advantage in accuracy or forgiveness that I could feel or see in my scoring. It was much harder to tune, first you have to learn how to pick the correct blade and then get the angle just right so you can draw the bow without the arrow coming off. Then you have to learn how to put the arrow back on the rest when it does come off at full or mid draw. Then you have to spend much more time tuning than normal. Along with the time spent learning how to draw the bow without it coming off the rest it is a huge undertaking.

I did enjoy my time with the blade rest, when you are a shooter who is spending at least 2 hours a day training this kind of effort to learn how to shoot a blade rest isn't really that big a deal.

Overall there is no comparison between blade rests in setup time and tuning and being able to draw the bow without it coming off the rest. The limb driven rests simply are way better in these areas. But, the ability to shoot really high scores and win tournaments has been dominated by the blade rests for years and for right now the top pro shooters are shooting them so until our new generation of pro shooters start winning with the limb driven rests it will be hard to say they are better than the blade. I personally think they are equally accurate in every way and it is just a matter of time until they take over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,431 Posts
I went to a seminar a few years ago in NJ with Dave & Jessie. They felt that a drop away would be a little better than a blade. However they did say that the drop-away rests needed to improve. At the time they were not durable enough for archers who practice like they do. Fine for 99% of us, but not the pros. Since then, there have been improvements in durability. A couple of newer designs have bearings instead of sleeves.

I do like the simplicity of a launcher blade, but a drop away does have advantages.

Allen
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top