Archery Talk Forum banner
21 - 40 of 54 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,025 Posts
Discussion Starter · #21 ·
That’s one way to read the data. However, I also don’t want my blade to have a sharpness of 460 or 524 from the start, either.
That is the problem with the angle. Depending on how they set up and applied pressure, their numbers can be way off. I have a couple of bishops, but I have already sharpened them, so I can not test to compare.

but for sure I had to sharpen them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
They’re not “his” broadheads. He’s stated a few times that he makes no money from GrizzlyStik’s “Ashby” broadheads, he only helped with the design back in the day. Even Alien Archery has “Ashby” named broadheads now.
Thx!

Sent from my SM-N986U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
The foundation released some edge retention test on a few broadheads. They gave the pre-shot and post-shot on a cape buffalo hunt done in July

I added the difference to the table to look at the edge retention difference. very surprised by the iron will.

(The numbers are an lb force given in gram to cut a specific material for testing edge retention) The test media is a certified test media. BESS

View attachment 7466225
It’s unfortunate the full report added information related to their personal opinions about the other manufacturers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,025 Posts
Discussion Starter · #25 · (Edited)
It’s unfortunate the full report added information related to their personal opinions about the other manufacturers.
Yes, now if they had looked at it as I did and looked at the actual loss and not just the numbers, it showed the grizzlystiks heads did not retain the edge.

I didn't see a sample rate. I may have missed it in the paper.

The 775gr arrow shot from the 39lb bow was useless data. They have zero comparisons. With the 24 years of Ashby research, you would think they would know how to test and show data.

There is an issue with the bishop 315gr test also. How did the 1150gr arrow get out penetrated by all the 665gr arrows?

They also talked about the mechanical advantage but didn't list it.

Font Line Material property Parallel Slope
 

·
Registered
Elite Valor 70# ,Sword single pin, Element arrows, 20 percent Foc
Joined
·
313 Posts
maybe it was 159 typo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
476 Posts
They’re not “his” broadheads. He’s stated a few times that he makes no money from GrizzlyStik’s “Ashby” broadheads, he only helped with the design back in the day. Even Alien Archery has “Ashby” named broadheads now.
You picked the wrong one. Follow the money.
 

·
Back Yard Champion
Joined
·
31,284 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
784 Posts
Pretty sure that’s worse…started out taking 50lbs to cut and ended with 188lbs. That’s not great
I may be wrong, but I’m pretty sure those numbers you’re citing aren’t units of measurement for lbs.

I’d also like to point out that the difference before & after use makes sense. A blade with an extremely fine edge theoretically would lose a higher percentage of retention compared to one with a less fine edge.

If you were to jam a butter knife through the buffalo, I’m certain you’d see a smaller percentage difference in sharpness before and after.

What I got from the test was, blades with really fine edges will have a larger difference of sharpness before and after the test.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,840 Posts
I feel something is wrong I tested lots of broadheads on the bess system I ever goy was around 135. That head was sharp as hell.

Here is a test I did on the 200gr maasia
Sub 100 is definitely doable with really low single bevel angles like 20 degrees, I can get an IW to 125 pretty easily and that’s double the angle. I’ve never seen anything close to 50 in the broadhead world, it exists in the custom knife world.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
784 Posts
Personally I'm interested in Mechanical Advantage lately. Animals are an imperfect test medium, due to no point is the same that we're testing the broadheads on. However, ballistic gel is also imperfect due to it's gel-qualities which can be quite grabby.

For example, what I've seen by watching broadheads go through gel is short, stout heads fair pretty well. TotA, Exodus, and Annihilator for example. These heads don't necessarily have the best MA, but they get around 6.5 up to 8 inch penetration. Then when heads such as the Tuffhead 3 Blade is tested (using John Lusk's results), this head underperforms at 5in penetration. It doesn't add up to the current MA science we have. This makes me think, is the science we have wrong or is it the test medium?

If it's the science, then we can find out where we went wrong. If it's the test medium, then we can find (or invent) a better test medium.

Another test that interests me is force-penetration tests. Brandon McDonald on his channel did a rough test of how much force it takes for a head to penetrate a piece of cow leather. In the video, even he admits that the test has many flaws but it was done just to give an idea. I just remember IW doing pretty well, mechs had a really rough time with the test, and Valkyrie penetrating like it was going through butter. Anyways, if we could create a force test like this, but with a better medium and scale of measurement, that would help give hunters an idea of how much energy is expended upon entry to an animal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
I may be wrong, but I’m pretty sure those numbers you’re citing aren’t units of measurement for lbs.

I’d also like to point out that the difference before & after use makes sense. A blade with an extremely fine edge theoretically would lose a higher percentage of retention compared to one with a less fine edge.

If you were to jam a butter knife through the buffalo, I’m certain you’d see a smaller percentage difference in sharpness before and after.

What I got from the test was, blades with really fine edges will have a larger difference of sharpness before and after the test.
It literally says its units of measurement is lbs.

I agree the fine edge might eroded more than a more blunt edge. However the tuffhead evolution has a 20deg bevel (the finest I now of) and had a really good result in edge retention. I think this is partly due to the steel they use for their heads and possibly the imperfect test medium (not hitting as much bone etc.)


I agree the carcass is an imperfect test medium for a small number of shots however if one shoots enough animals (hundreds or thousands of shots with each head) then you can get a pretty good idea of performance. It would be better than gel, more realistic at least, but you have to have the large dataset such as with the original Ashby study.
 
21 - 40 of 54 Posts
Top