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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I'm a complete noob in archery (currently taking a course through a local club though!)
(Pleas re-direct me if I'm posting this in the wrong place! I apologize)


Just recently I went to a pro shop (which unfortunately happens to be a 1h30 drive away) to get my first bow!
I was also outfitted with half a dozen Carbon Express Predator II 800 arrows.
In hindsight however... I feel like I should have gotten more in fear that I will either break or loose those arrows (which as a beginner I feel I'm more than likely to do)
So I'm looking to purchase more arrows online... which leads me to the question....

In terms of a budding archer with olympic archery as an option / potential end goal here
Is it recommended to go with cheap carbon arrows to start off or aluminum arrows to start off?

So I've spent the better part of the day trying to search for answers here before posting... and all I could figure from the mixed opinions & suggestions is that a lot of people suggest the Easton XX75 Jazz arrows and the easton tribute arrows
with lots of comments saying that aluminum arrows are much more "forgiving" at the price of being less durable & more likely to bend. (Please correct me if I'm wrong)

On the other hand aside from the Carbon Impact Super Club Carbon arrows, I can't seem to find all that much information with suggestions in regards to carbon arrows.

Is there really a safer / better arrow route to go as a beginner?
 

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I use Easton tributes - cheap and durable enough, I suppose. Mostly cheap. And aluminium arrows are generally decent enough for the likes of me.
 

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Any of the Easton xx75 models are good starter arrows. Pretty sturdy and forgiving but at lower weight you give up distance because they are heavier then Carbon arrows. Indoors it's not a big deal, outdoors over 30m is when carbons really become a must at lower bow weight. As a beginner, I'd say stay at 20m indoor or outdoor with aluminum for a while and get used to shooting and getting your form and muscles built up for a bit.

That said I just got some CI super clubs and they are very nice arrows.
JMHO
-Jim
 

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Welcome vephyr! it would be very helpful if you listed all your gear, (look at the first sticky at top of page) as is, there is no description of you or your equipment in your post. To recommend an arrow, the gear and person that's going to shoot it makes a difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Any of the Easton xx75 models are good starter arrows. Pretty sturdy and forgiving but at lower weight you give up distance because they are heavier then Carbon arrows. Indoors it's not a big deal, outdoors over 30m is when carbons really become a must at lower bow weight. As a beginner, I'd say stay at 20m indoor or outdoor with aluminum for a while and get used to shooting and getting your form and muscles built up for a bit.

That said I just got some CI super clubs and they are very nice arrows.
JMHO
-Jim
This certainly gives me some insight on what to go for! Thank you for the input :)

Welcome vephyr! it would be very helpful if you listed all your gear, (look at the first sticky at top of page) as is, there is no description of you or your equipment in your post. To recommend an arrow, the gear and person that's going to shoot it makes a difference.
Thanks! Sorry about that, please see below:
-SF Forged+ 25" Riser
-Short 20# Axiom Limbs
-Draw Length is approx. 26.75"
- and currently shooting with a finger tab :)
 

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CI Super Clubs 10/20 spine. Leave em full length to start.
Use the blue low temp hot melt on the points and you'll be able to get em out running them under hot water if you need to trim em down as you increase draw weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
CI Super Clubs 10/20 spine. Leave em full length to start.
Use the blue low temp hot melt on the points and you'll be able to get em out running them under hot water if you need to trim em down as you increase draw weight.
In the case of short distances (ie. as mentioned above <30m) what would the advantage of these be vs grabbbing Easton Tributes or Jazz arrows?
 

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In the case of short distances (ie. as mentioned above <30m) what would the advantage of these be vs grabbbing Easton Tributes or Jazz arrows?
Durability, findability...

Aluminums have more consistent spine than low or even medium end carbons. But they are also more prone to getting bent. Carbons, if they are straight, stay straight. But they are also more prone to catastrophic failure. We just had a Super Club break on one of our archers. It blew on release, sending the shaft down range minus the fletched end (it separated a few inches below the fletches). The bow draw weight is in 20s, so we are not talking a huge acceleration force. Fortunately, nobody was injured. But, AFIK, most blown arrows these days are carbon rather than aluminum. Carbon arrows can have invisible or near invisible fractures and need to be inspected frequently.

Second, and this may not apply to you, but aluminum arrows are way easier to find with a metal detector when they are hidden in the grass than carbons.

Aluminum arrows are a good value for many, especially where distance isn't a factor.
 

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I tend to recommend the Easton Carbon One arrows. They are typically a little more money than most beginners want to spend but they have decent spine consistency and offer enough spine choices that you can find an arrow that will match most setups. I steer beginners away from aluminum's because at the spine rating that most beginners need the aluminum's will bend rather easily. Simply missing the target has a strong potential of rendering the arrow useless. I had one archer that was not particularly skilled yet purchase aluminum arrows against my recommendation because the local shop told them that's what they should shoot. The archer managed to bend 3 arrows in the first night. I managed to stay mute on the subject and the parent came up to me after the class and apologized and admitted maybe they should have listen to me.

True more carbon arrows fail but that may be because there are 75% of the arrows being sent down range are carbon. Also an aluminum arrow that is about to fail will be severely bent and obvious that it is unusable. So yes carbon arrows can fail so checking them regularly for cracks by flexing them next to your ear and listening for the sounds of crackling noises is a good idea. I've been involved with our youth program for nearly 9 years now and have yet to have a failure, but I do request that anyone who thinks they may have damaged an arrow let me know right away. I also make a point of thanking and applauding the archer when they catch a damaged arrow. Given our failure rate 0 I have to say that the risk although real is easily mitigated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The idea of a damaged carbon arrow splintering / failing on release is terrifying. I certainly need to learn how to properly flex arrows / check them prior to shooting.

On that note maybe that's why I'm a little more curious to go down the Al arrow route (well, that and cost since they seem cheaper!)


I tend to recommend the Easton Carbon One arrows. They are typically a little more money than most beginners want to spend but they have decent spine consistency and offer enough spine choices that you can find an arrow that will match most setups. I steer beginners away from aluminum's because at the spine rating that most beginners need the aluminum's will bend rather easily. Simply missing the target has a strong potential of rendering the arrow useless. I had one archer that was not particularly skilled yet purchase aluminum arrows against my recommendation because the local shop told them that's what they should shoot. The archer managed to bend 3 arrows in the first night. I managed to stay mute on the subject and the parent came up to me after the class and apologized and admitted maybe they should have listen to me. .
Although, by what you're saying it certainly seems like getting Aluminum arrows will end up costing me more because I'll more than likely bend a number of them, which makes sense.

How do the Easton Carbon Ones compare to my current Carbon Express Predator IIs?
 

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Warbow, Actually that was a Medallion XR 1000 that failed. I'm guessing was hit by another arrow at some point and wasn't checked..
Doh!

The SCs have really held up better than I had expected. No more arrow straitening for you. And breakage is pretty minimal. I lost a few of my SCs to steel bale fittings, but that would have likely broken my AL arrows as well.

As to the break, it was right where the back node would be, so I do wonder if that is realated. I also found a similar separation on another arrow near bale 1 (not a club arrow).
 

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How easily do aluminum shafts bend? Do they bend when you hit the wood or each other?
How easy to bend depends on material and model. X7's don't bend nearly as easily however they are more brittle. XX75 or XX78 tend to be softer so they bend easier. Thinner (lighter spines) bend easier.

When do they bend, All of the above including improper pulling from a bale, stepping on them, missing the bale (ground or hard items on floor), etc. in the case of very thin arrows (like 1214's) just gripping them too tight when pulling them can bend them. Grabbing multiple arrows while pulling them or holding an arrow in the hand while trying to pull a second or third arrow can bend them.
 

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The idea of a damaged carbon arrow splintering / failing on release is terrifying. I certainly need to learn how to properly flex arrows / check them prior to shooting.
We've broken many an AL arrow as well. I've seen them fail and shatter on release as well. (x7's anyway) all the xx75's I've seen fail are usually a folded arrow or severely bent arrow.

Yes, Everyone that shoots should learn how to check their arrows regardless of what kind they are. A small dent in an AL arrow could be a problem as well.

The only way I've seen the woven carbon arrows catastrophically is by snapping. The ones that scare me are the extruded carbon arrows. Every Beman arrow I've found on the range that was broken was scary to pick (extremely sharp shards) up let alone think of what might have happened if it came apart upon shooting. I have one in our "teaching" collection to show people how to flex test carbons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The only way I've seen the woven carbon arrows catastrophically is by snapping. The ones that scare me are the extruded carbon arrows. Every Beman arrow I've found on the range that was broken was scary to pick (extremely sharp shards) up let alone think of what might have happened if it came apart upon shooting. I have one in our "teaching" collection to show people how to flex test carbons.
On that note, how can you tell the two arrows apart? Is there anything visually to tell whether the arrow is a carbon extrusion vs woven carbon?
 

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If you cut and assemble your own arrows you can usually tell. I just know Beman arrows are extruded, Carbon Impact arrows are woven. I am pretty sure Carbon Express is a woven or wrapped construction based on the way the Medallion failed (and after having cut and assembled several)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
If you cut and assemble your own arrows you can usually tell. I just know Beman arrows are extruded, Carbon Impact arrows are woven. I am pretty sure Carbon Express is a woven or wrapped construction based on the way the Medallion failed (and after having cut and assembled several)
Alright, I'll keep that in mind and stick with CIs or Carbon Express if I do make a purchase in the near future
 

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Get some aluminums with feathers, I started with platinum pluses. At the 10/15/20 distances a beginning archer should start at, that setup will work inside and out, and be as accurate as you are. That should even get a noob out to 40 or 50 later on if you want (out a little past that the weight and wind and feathers catch up to you....but that's likely a little while off). At around that crossover I'd look at lighter carbons. I use the Carbon Impacts outside for 900/70m type distances because they are light and will fly, are inexpensive and do the job alright. But to me they (carbons period) are a little fast and twitchy for indoor work for a noob. Won't group as well and want to take off when you send a flyer. Can be instructive but basically a punishing setup on purpose.
 
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