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Discussion Starter #1
With the ATA taking place now and in our line of work, price setting is always top of mind. Bowhunting is a great sport/hobby and the funds bowhunters have to spend on the sport is usually as little as they can afford as bowhunters are a frugal bunch. Everybody is in a different boat in regards to wealth/income and bowhunting sure does a good job of catering to all wage levels. Our sport really can be done at very little cost if you want it to (or your income level demands it)

At the same time, a person sure can spend large sums to accomplish the same goal and enjoyment level and full freezer if you want to. If you wish to and are able you can send a nearly $200 arrow at a game animal.

Arrow

http://www.grizzlystik.com/Momentum-TDT-Custom-Arrows-C7.aspx

Broadhead

http://www.grizzlystik.com/Forged-Single-Bevel-Broadheads-C71.aspx

Tracking device

https://pro-tracker.com/shop/

From a $1500 bow with a $900 auto ranging sight and $150 Quiver, $200+ rest, $200 stab and a $200+ release.

The guy who invested $3,150 in the bow and its accessories and $1,200 on a half dozen arrows/broadheads/tracker can have as much enjoyment/challenge, satisfaction and meat in the freezer as the guy using a garage sale bow, used arrows and Walmart/Allen broadheads.

Bowhunting is a great sport that excludes nobody.
 

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spoon & crockpot proud member......killing tomorrows trophys today
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Agreed, it doesn't have to be a huge financial commitment but even to get fully set up with lower cost gear still adds up. But it's fun either way. Looking at new stuff and stuff you can't afford is part of the fun. I get a lot of enjoyment out of cruising the classifieds looking and waiting for a specific bow or accessory to pop up.
 

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The Impartial Archer
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18,767 Posts
I agree. I got caught up in the "latest and greatest" for years. Anything new I was on it right away. Then one day I realized I wasn't having fun anymore.

Now I have a bow that's a 2007 model, I haven't bought arrows in years (I just use the old ones that work fine) and the sights and accessories I use for years until an advancement comes along I can't afford to pass up.

I have said this for years and people that have been in the sport a long time know it. The big advancements for hunting only come around so often. Like riser's went from wood-composite-machined aluminum-carbon (when it becomes affordable) and those were big changes.

Old painted sights went away overnight when fiber optics came out and you simply couldn't pass them up.

When parallel limbs came out they also changed hunting bows forever......another must have IMO.

Last would be carbon arrows. Even though I don't use them and think they are over-rated you still can't argue the success they have had and that they have changed the industry.

But really ALL those changes are old.............The newest is the parallel limbs and that was in 1998 for argument sake.

My point is you can go out and spend thousands on gear but if you know what you are looking for and shop around you can have a setup just as effective for under $700 to. That might sound like a lot and up front to some folks maybe it is.......but other than the arrows you can get years and years of service from that investment.

I drop money in heartbeat if there is a clear cut advantage but really we have flat lined in technology over the last decade or 2 for sure.
 

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Hunting is like any other hobby. You can do it and enjoy it with inexpensive stuff. But the more you get into it the more you are gonna spend.

Just like golf. Start with cheap clubs at cheap courses and eventually you are playing with expensive clubs at expensive courses.
 

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I enjoy the buy-trying-reselling process and thus the AT classifies are highly valued as I don't like funding depreciation. I feel like I am being wisely frugal by purchasing good used or pre-owned gear that suits my bowhunting needs. Some like to brag about how much they spent.....other about how much they saved.....I'm somewhere in the middle. I like value for my hard earned dollar and don't tend to impulse buy very often, which prevents purchasing new stuff that I might not end up keeping. I have camo that is older than a portion of the AT posters.....the experts on Sitka and First Lite and Kuiu......:wink:
 

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With the ATA taking place now and in our line of work, price setting is always top of mind. Bowhunting is a great sport/hobby and the funds bowhunters have to spend on the sport is usually as little as they can afford as bowhunters are a frugal bunch. Everybody is in a different boat in regards to wealth/income and bowhunting sure does a good job of catering to all wage levels. Our sport really can be done at very little cost if you want it to (or your income level demands it)

At the same time, a person sure can spend large sums to accomplish the same goal and enjoyment level and full freezer if you want to. If you wish to and are able you can send a nearly $200 arrow at a game animal.

Arrow

http://www.grizzlystik.com/Momentum-TDT-Custom-Arrows-C7.aspx

Broadhead

http://www.grizzlystik.com/Forged-Single-Bevel-Broadheads-C71.aspx

Tracking device

https://pro-tracker.com/shop/

From a $1500 bow with a $900 auto ranging sight and $150 Quiver, $200+ rest, $200 stab and a $200+ release.

The guy who invested $3,150 in the bow and its accessories and $1,200 on a half dozen arrows/broadheads/tracker can have as much enjoyment/challenge, satisfaction and meat in the freezer as the guy using a garage sale bow, used arrows and Walmart/Allen broadheads.

Bowhunting is a great sport that excludes nobody.
i agree, it's an awesome activity!

the cool thing about the current environment of archery, i can spend a fraction of what some do if i choose, and still have all very high end equipment. i'm not a huge spender, or frugal. fishing and hunting are what i spend my extra money on, they are my only form of recreation (always been that way) i like quality equipment.

if i wanted to do it on the cheap, i could start with a 300 dollar bow that is pretty dang nice, accessorize it for another 150.00, a dozen goldtip "team primos" arrows (cheap, heavy, tough arrows) a 6pk of standard 100 gr muzzy heads, 75 dollar used rangefinder that would get me by.

you are correct, it doesn't exclude anyone, and it doesn't even exclude anyone from using quality equipment. it really is an awesome activity.
 

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As a new guy getting into it, I think the barrier to entry is huge. Its very expensive. I guess the markets for supply and demand have brought us to this point, but its unfortunate. I think it limits a lot of new guys getting more into it, let alone kids.....
 

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As a new guy getting into it, I think the barrier to entry is huge. Its very expensive. I guess the markets for supply and demand have brought us to this point, but its unfortunate. I think it limits a lot of new guys getting more into it, let alone kids.....
If you aren't on AT it's a lot cheaper. While there is a lot of good advice here, there is also a large faction on here that is good at spending other people's money. I know people that don't spend more than $50 a year and then tags and archery hunt a lot.
(I'm unfortunately not one of them:embara:)
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
As a new guy getting into it, I think the barrier to entry is huge. Its very expensive. I guess the markets for supply and demand have brought us to this point, but its unfortunate. I think it limits a lot of new guys getting more into it, let alone kids.....
We set up a guy with a 1990 version bow for $100. Aluminum Arrows for $20. Broadheads for $20. He got a release at wally word for $15. He got a pile of sand for a broadhead target.

It can be done at very low cost if you want to enter the sport. If you want to keep up with Joneses you dont know if you should even be trying to keep up with as a newby then yes, hype can cost a great deal.

Check out Craigslist. The volume if used gear outsanding thanks to all the "every year new" guys that pay the heavy price and then sell.
 

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Mark
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Could not agree more. A guy I know that’s kill quality bucks year after year still uses and old Mathews. Once you get most of your equipment paid for at any price range Hunting is fairly cheap. I generally buy most stuff on sale if possible and if buying a bow I wait patiently for a great deal such as close out, previous year or dealer that’s just needs to move some cheaply. Right now is the time to buy a 2016/2017 new bow as dealers need to sell inventory so they can buy more new models coming.

The guy that complains about 3 broadheads cost $39 is spending $39 to play 18 holes or $39 to go to baseball game and not complaining about that! Money is about priorities and different for everyone!
 

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What about the cost of decent clothing to keep you warm and dry?
Define 'decent'. People were hunting for many years before the latest greatest 'decent' clothing came on the market. One of the guys I mentioned before gets a wool sweater from Goodwill under Carhart type bibs he's had for 20 years. Cheap camo insulated coat. $2 knitted hat. $20 treestand umbrella, if it's raining harder than that 'he out'. I admire him really, I can't do it. Seems I have a pocket on fire too often and need to get my money out.
Contrary to what many on here will have you believe, you won't die if you sit in a treestand in 40 degree weather using the old waffle cotton thermals. If so, I wouldn't be here to be typing this. There was a lot of hunting in the 1920's through the 2000's before most of this 'decent' clothing came on the market.
Do I like the newer stuff? Yep, but as I already stated, I don't tend to do this on the cheap.

Edit: Just remembered my Grandfather laughing at me because in 2002 my 1985 vintage compound was suddenly not capable of killing deer anymore and I needed a new bow. I became "the techie". :wink:
 

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With the ATA taking place now and in our line of work, price setting is always top of mind. Bowhunting is a great sport/hobby and the funds bowhunters have to spend on the sport is usually as little as they can afford as bowhunters are a frugal bunch. Everybody is in a different boat in regards to wealth/income and bowhunting sure does a good job of catering to all wage levels. Our sport really can be done at very little cost if you want it to (or your income level demands it)

At the same time, a person sure can spend large sums to accomplish the same goal and enjoyment level and full freezer if you want to. If you wish to and are able you can send a nearly $200 arrow at a game animal.

Arrow

http://www.grizzlystik.com/Momentum-TDT-Custom-Arrows-C7.aspx

Broadhead

http://www.grizzlystik.com/Forged-Single-Bevel-Broadheads-C71.aspx

Tracking device

https://pro-tracker.com/shop/

From a $1500 bow with a $900 auto ranging sight and $150 Quiver, $200+ rest, $200 stab and a $200+ release.

The guy who invested $3,150 in the bow and its accessories and $1,200 on a half dozen arrows/broadheads/tracker can have as much enjoyment/challenge, satisfaction and meat in the freezer as the guy using a garage sale bow, used arrows and Walmart/Allen broadheads.

Bowhunting is a great sport that excludes nobody.
soon it will be rich mans game working folk dont have chance
 

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I spent a bunch of money starting out because I didn’t know what I would like.

Now, two years later, thankfully I don’t need anything and am pretty much set for life. Got new stuff (2 carbon bows bought last year) and as far as I’m concerned I’m good. I should be!

Lord knows I’ve got one of about everything except any ozonics stuff, I don’t need to get into that but I’m not interested in it either.

I’ll probably be shooting these same bows 10 years from now. I take really good care of my stuff.
 

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So what’s the consensus for how much, “not much money to start hunting” is? I’m a new archer. I’ve just gone through this whole buying process. I’m curious what you guys think a “not much money” budget is.
 

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Pretty sure my success rate wouldn't change if I rolled with a cheap climber and backpack, old school army camo and a hand me down bow. Just replace strings every few years and top off with broadheads and arrows as needed.
 

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Former Wyoming Boy
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What about the cost of decent clothing to keep you warm and dry?
If you knew how many years I hunted elk in the Rocky Mts with non-Gore Tex work boots... you'd have a heart attack!
 

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Former Wyoming Boy
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So what’s the consensus for how much, “not much money to start hunting” is? I’m a new archer. I’ve just gone through this whole buying process. I’m curious what you guys think a “not much money” budget is.
In 1991, my bow cracked a limb... right before a bear hunt.
I went through the classified in the paper and bought a bow with sights, rest, quiver and arrows for $150.
Now, 1991 was a long time ago, but the principle is still the same.
 
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