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It's just this old Hillbillys' opinion, but this is the time of year we all need to be thinking of making humane, clean, kills on the animals we hunt. So I thought I'd try do my part to help, if I can. The following is from page 14 of the Easton Tuning Guide. If you don't have it go to the Easton download page and get it. It will serve you well. So here it is:
"14 Arrow Tuning and Maintenance Guide
In general terms, broadhead tuning is done by first shooting a group of arrows with field points into the target, and then by shooting a group of arrows with broadheads. The two groups are compared and the appropriate adjustments are made. CAUTION: Never shoot unfletched shafts with broadheads. Flight is extremely erratic and dangerous. The field points should be as close in weight as possible to the weight of the broadheads. Because it is necessary to first establish a good group with field points, broadhead tuning can be done only after acceptable tuning has been established with field points. Grouping Field Points Set up a suitable broadhead target at a distance of 20 to 30 yards. Using a set of field point tipped arrows that have been tuned with your bow, shoot a group of 3 or 4 arrows into the target. Take care to shoot as good a group as you are capable.
Grouping Broadheads Using identical arrows tipped with broadheads, shoot a group of 3 or 4 arrows into the target. Use the same aiming spot that was used for the field points. The shot group is the key. Once you are confident yo have shot a respectable group based on your ability, compare the position of the two groups. Make the adjustments listed below to your setup and shoot both groups again. Keep adjusting and shooting until both groups (field points and broadheads) group in the same area.
Adjustments
Adjustments sometimes affect more than is expected. It is best to always make the up/down adjustments first. Once the two groups are on the same horizontal plane, then make the left/right adjustments. (See Fig. 20 below.) 1. If the broadheads group above the field points, move the nocking point up. 2. If the broadheads group below the field points, move the nocking point down. 3. If the broadheads group to the left, they are behaving as if the shaft is too stiff (for a right-handed archer). Any, or several, of the following can be done to correct the point of impact. • Increase the poundage on the bow. • Change to heavier broadheads. • If you are using a cushion plunger, decrease the spring tension. • Move the arrow rest or cushion plunger in toward the bow. Make adjustments 1/32" at a time. 4. If the broadheads group to the right, they are behaving as if the shaft is too weak. Any or several of the following can be done to correct the point of impact. • Decrease the poundage on the bow. • Change to lighter broadheads. • If you are using a cushion plunger, increase the spring tension. • Move the arrow rest or cushion plunger out away from the bow. Make adjustments 1/32" at a time. Remember, broadhead tuning can only be accomplished after the bow has been properly set up and tuned with field or target points. Be sure to use broadheads that have been installed correctly, and are in line with the arrow shaft."
The graphic is attached. I truely hope this helps someone fill their tag this year. Good luck to you all. Be safe.
Shoot Straight
Derbytown :D
 

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Very good post and thanks for the refresher.
 
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