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Which is the better broadhead? In the early years I shot 125 grain thunderheads. For the last 10 years I have shot the 100 grain version. Looking back at the deer I have shot I would say that the 125 left better blood trails and penetrated bone and passed through the deer more effeciently. Other than speed, what would be the advantage of one over the other?
 

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i have used the 100's and the 85's and personally dont see much difference in the two. i have blown through every deer i have shot other than a couple of spine shots. i have killed alot of deer w/ both the 100 and the 85. i would think that any of the 3 would be a good choice for deer. my blood trails have been pretty good when i make the right shot, and that really is the bottom line!!:D easton94
 

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This will be my first year shooting the 100s. I have killed a pile of deer with 125s over the years. I can't imagine that either has a real advantage as far as blood trail goes. They are both razor sharp and cut everything in their path.
I know I have seen blood trails from the 125s that would make you wonder how the deer made it more than 20 yards before they were bone dry.

So... to answer your question. I don't know YET. I may go hog hunting this weekend and find out though;) Otherwise, deer season opens in two short weeks:D
 

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If your wanting all the knock down power you can get go with the 125's in my mind im not a expert! But id choose the broadhead that had 1. wider cutting diameter, 2. which one pentrated better, and which you feel comfortable with.
 

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The weight changes kenetic energy. But if you have too much weight (125 gr.) you loose speed and with 85 you gain speed but loose kenetic so i shoot 100 cuz its in the middle. Ive seen 160's before.
 

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I have taken deer, elk, moose with 100 gr t-heads.:) Fly good, good blood trails and most impotantly, FILLED TAGS!:D I love em'. I shoot about 250 fps, with 2514's at 520 grains.;)
 

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125 vs 100 grain

Just for an example, a 400 grain arrow (with a 100 grain broadhead) shooting 280 fps, will produce 69.65 pounds of K.E. (kenetic energy).

The same arrow weighing 425 (with a 125 grain broadhead) will shoot about 275 fps. A general rule of thumb, is for every 5 grains of arrow weight you go up or down, you will change about 1 fps (25 grains heavier=5 fps slower).

This will get a K.E. rating of 71.39, which is a difference of 1.74 foot pounds. Not really enough to be concerned with.

Both the 100 and 125 Thunderheads have the same cutting diameter (1 3/16).

Now lets say you are shooting a 30" 2317 at 70 lbs., with a 125 grain head, weighing 523 grains, at 255 fps. Your K.E. would be 75.53.

The same bow with a 30" 3-71 ACC, which is the same spine, but only weighs 398 grains with a 100 grain head, shoots about 280 fps. Your K.E. would still be 69.30 lbs. A difference of 6.23 lbs of K.E. even though your total arrow weight is 125 grains less.

The key is matching the right arrow shaft, with the right head weight for your bow. I would shoot which ever weight head tunes the best with your particular set up.
 

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Don't forget!

Hey don't forget that you are also adding the weight of the insert into your equation for the "FOC" and total arrow weight and spine considerations. That's an extra 37 grains on a 2317 shaft. Not as much for carbons but is still something to consider! Ken
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I am shooting a Q2XL at 60lbs 28 1/2 inch draw. A 28 1/2 inch 2315 with 3 5 inch feather fletched helical. Now what do you think? oh finger release.
 

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Re: 125 vs 100 grain

RHINO said:
Just for an example, a 400 grain arrow (with a 100 grain broadhead) shooting 280 fps, will produce 69.65 pounds of K.E. (kenetic energy).

The same arrow weighing 425 (with a 125 grain broadhead) will shoot about 275 fps. A general rule of thumb, is for every 5 grains of arrow weight you go up or down, you will change about 1 fps (25 grains heavier=5 fps slower).

This will get a K.E. rating of 71.39, which is a difference of 1.74 foot pounds. Not really enough to be concerned with.

Both the 100 and 125 Thunderheads have the same cutting diameter (1 3/16).

Now lets say you are shooting a 30" 2317 at 70 lbs., with a 125 grain head, weighing 523 grains, at 255 fps. Your K.E. would be 75.53.

The same bow with a 30" 3-71 ACC, which is the same spine, but only weighs 398 grains with a 100 grain head, shoots about 280 fps. Your K.E. would still be 69.30 lbs. A difference of 6.23 lbs of K.E. even though your total arrow weight is 125 grains less.

The key is matching the right arrow shaft, with the right head weight for your bow. I would shoot which ever weight head tunes the best with your particular set up.
IMHO-i think Rhino's last statement is the answer-shoot whatever combo of arrow, head, fletch...etc..tunes the best in your bow
 

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Since we are discussing Thunderheads, let me throw this out there. Have any of you noticed that the 100s whistle more than the 125s? I wonder if the bridge in the blade makes the 100s whistle. Or is it just my imagination?
This is my first year shooting 100s (have shot 125s since they hit the market) and they sure seem to sing on the way to the target.
 

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Rhino is on the money. When you change your head by 25 grains, you may not find your arrow/tip weight to be an ideal combination anymore. The materials in both heads are identical, with the 100 having a slightly shorter body. The blade thickness is the same on both (.027") and as Rhino said, the cut diameters are the same. Figure out which grain weight works best with your arrow spine and shoot em... I've shot and taken animals with both and they are both great heads...
 
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