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outback1
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I was just wondering,is it better to have to long a d/l or to short?I read so many threads on here about d/l being an inch or so to long and hardly ever see draw length to short.what makes to long a draw so bad?around here there are no pros or shops to go to to get an acurate answer.
 

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I was about to post kinda the same thing, but on the opposite end. I was having my TX4 outfitted, & the pro shop guys tells me it is too short for me :(. I'm currently shooting it @ 29", but I guess maybe I can move it out to 30" & pick up a little speed :)
 

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If you have to error then go with a little too short. Within 1/2" either way is not going to make a noticeable difference. If your draw length is too long then you sacrifice accuracy because it is less comfortable, less repeatable, etc....you don't want to feel like you are straining and stretched because you should feel relaxed for the shot.
 

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(aka lug nut)
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I was just wondering,is it better to have to long a d/l or to short?I read so many threads on here about d/l being an inch or so to long and hardly ever see draw length to short.what makes to long a draw so bad?around here there are no pros or shops to go to to get an acurate answer.
Depends if you always shoot indoors, on flat level ground,
and never shoot outside.






Top photo is the "before" photo.

We have several things going on in the top photo.

1) hips are shifted closer to the target than da feet/ankles.

2) shoulders are shifted farther away from the target than the hips

3) wrist on the release side is higher than da elbow tip
....this creates lots and lots of tension in the upper arm (bicep...small muscle)
....this uphill angle on the forearm, also locks out the upper back
....so the upper back cannot help pull through the shot, with the elbow low
....if you have the release side forearm uphill, and the arrow downhill...

this means you will not be as rock steady as you COULD be.

4) release hand is too far back, so not enough facial anchor point reference
(coaches call this a "floating anchor point"...which means hard to repeat)
(hard to repeat anchor...equals your accuracy not as GOOD as it could be)


So.....

what are the possible FIXES?

A)...stand up straight.

(sounds so simple)
(actually, it is)
(only problem...a shooter cannot SEE himself at full draw)

a shooter must learn the FEEL of standing up straight.

So,
what is standing up straight?

Well,
gotta be standing on level ground, to practice standing up straight.

Ok....check...picture of fella is standing on level ground.


Gotta have the ankles
gotta have the knees
gotta have the leg bones
gotta have the hip joints
gotta have the shoulders
ALL forming a vertical line.

Top photo...

ankles, knees, leg bones, hip joints, shoulders are NOT in a vertical line.


So,
haven't mentioned a thing YET, about the bow DL setting.

First,
gotta get the shooter to stand up straight.

Suggest a stack of boxes.






After you have the shooter standing up straight...

then,
figure out how the shooter stands.

Pay particular attention to the direction that the two shoulders point.


Target shooters (usually...sometimes) will have the two shoulders
pointed straight at the target.





So,
here is 2nd Nature is more of a target shooting position.

Notice,
not a lot of space between the arrow and the bow shoulder.

Very narrow gap between the arrow and upper body.

This would not work at 0 degrees,
with snow and a heavy heavy hunting jacket.

Works great in summer, with a t-shirt, and target shooting.



Hunters (right handed ones),
will have the two shoulders pointed off to the left,
when the arrow is pointed straight ahead...towards the target.






When you are in a "narrow" shooting position,
and the shoulders are pointed the same direction the target...






this INCREASES the distance
from the corner of your mouth,
to the grip of your bow....slightly.



If you point your shoulders say 45 degrees off to the left,
so you have lots and lots and lots of room for that heavy sleeve on your jacket...

then,
you shorten your "reach"...
and the bow hand actually comes CLOSER to the corner of your mouth.



So,
back to the pictures.



Hand is higher than the elbow.

After the release fires,
the hand is going to flip UP and AWAY.


In this "doctored up" photo,



the release hand is MUCH CLOSER to the grip,
the release hand is FARTHER FORWARD on his face...

with the release hand CLOSER to the grip,
then the forearm bones are now flat, like the arrow (horizontal)...

so,
after the release fires,
the hand is going to spring away BACKWARDS
while the arrow flies FORWARDS...

much better follow through motion...
much more accurate results.
 

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Nuts pretty well covered it.The basic jist is repeatability and accuracy.The pin is not able to float on target if you are too long and if you are too short,there is more repeatability than too long but the pin can lock up causing it to jump around and in some cases,cause injury to the shooter.Shoulders get cramped and causes undue stress.

1 thing I would like to point out.I am a shoulders to the target guy and it can be done with a hunting rig for the most part.You may have to slightly turn like nuts has illustrated but with the string stops nowadays,it does allow us to get more behind our shots without fear of contact.Getting behind the shot is much easier to repeat,that is why I like it.

The key to any type of shooting is practice what you will be doing.If you are hunting,put your hunting clothes on and see if you can shoot seated or in wierd positions you might encounter while hunting.
 

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outback1
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Discussion Starter #8
update: after working on my form a couple of weeks now my reapeatability is a ton better, I shortned my dl one inch witch is a lot more compfortable,
I had to move my sight up becaulse while tring to work on form I was shooting high and to the left, is this normal?
thanks for all the help, I know anyone that's having isues like me will get a lot of info on this thread
thanks again!!
 

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My vote is that short is better. Unless you can always be standing like on the range with no obstructions to get around, kneeling, squating, and bending all make a full draw less likely.
 

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good stuff right there ! Thanks !
 
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