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I used a wrist for years.. but always wanted to go to the hand /thumb release because of then problems and noise the wrist release makes with filming

and I have short stubby fingers and finding a wrist release short enough has always been a problem
 

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There are people for hunting with a hand held and people against it. I can say from experience hunting with a hand held is a pain. Between forgetting it, the metal getting cold, not being able to use gloves, dropping it, and the fact that it's hard to get good anchor when the adrenaline is pumping, I would say a wrist release is more practical for hunting. If you shoot leagues and such I would recommend a hand held, hinge, or back tension. There are hundreds of wrist releases out there, you just have to do some research.
 

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There are people for hunting with a hand held and people against it. I can say from experience hunting with a hand held is a pain. Between forgetting it, the metal getting cold, not being able to use gloves, dropping it, and the fact that it's hard to get good anchor when the adrenaline is pumping, I would say a wrist release is more practical for hunting. If you shoot leagues and such I would recommend a hand held, hinge, or back tension. There are hundreds of wrist releases out there, you just have to do some research.
That is your opinion....and experience....but mine is quite different. I switched to a hand held thumb button release nearly 3 years ago and the only issue you listed that I feel has a bit of merit is they do indeed get cold. I once forgot my wrist release and once forgot my hand held.....tie. I cut the index finger stall off my hunting glove for an index....all the finger stalls off for a hand held....still wear a glove with both. Your anchor is your anchor....if you miss it with a hand held you are just as likely to mess it up with a wrist release.....both are based on practice and repetition. If you start looking, there a DOZENS of model of each type.....wrist and hand held. Best thing to do is try out both and compare. Just make sure you don't buy the cheapest hand held and try it a couple times....it requires the same commitment that you invested when learning to properly shoot a wrist release.
 

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I have arthritis and tend to drop things.

I switched to a handheld Stan SX3 after using a TruFire Hardcore Max wrist release for a few years, and I just knew I was really going to hate myself for switching the first time I dropped it out of a treestand thirty feet up.

I was right.

But I hated myself even more the SECOND time I dropped it this past fall. (I had it clipped into the D-loop but must have bumped it enough to trigger the barrel on the buss or control cable.)
Not really a huge deal, but it sure seems like it at the time!

I haven't decided if I'm switching back to the TruFire; I shoot the Stan really well...
 

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I shot wrist releases several years ago and changed to hand held and have been shooting them for years. I just bought a Keeton release which is a combo of a wrist and hand held. I use my middle finger to trigger it and have to say once I got used to it I'm very impressed.
 

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Been shooting with a thumb release for 3 years an don't plan on goin back. I love my Stan shootoff...
 

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For hunting, a wrist strap release. I always know where it is.....
 

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I used a wrist for years.. but always wanted to go to the hand /thumb release because of then problems and noise the wrist release makes with filming

and I have short stubby fingers and finding a wrist release short enough has always been a problem
I too have short stubby fingers...so I feel your pain. The problem that I had with the thumb release was that if I really didn't focus on holding the release with a death grip while drawing, it would slip out of my fingers when I hit the back wall. Did this several times, so it wasn't for me. I then bought a Scott Longhorn Hunter which is a hinge style release with a wrist strap. Really like it for target shooting and 3D, but I really started getting nervous about hunting with it so about a month before the season started I went back to my wrist strap. Will start back up with the hinge after season closes. Hope my experience helps.
 

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I was once in the never thumb release for hunting camp until I switched. I shoot a lot better. It’s clipped on my d-loop from the time I get in the tree and I don’t think about it anymore. I pick my bow up and shoot. I always have a back up with me in my pack, but knock on wood, I I haven’t needed the backup.


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I have shot both. I recently went back to an index release. When hunting in my experience it was the same as target shooting to get to my anchor point. Trying to get to my anchor with a thumb release wihen it’s cold didn’t work well. Collar up on my neck, balaclava, etc was just to much to get anchored comfortably. Just my experience/opinion.
 

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I shot a wrist strap for years and after shooting a back tension in 3d tournaments I went to a spot hogg Friday night delight for hunting. I rigged up a wrist strap and I won't drop it or loose it out of a tree. I don't see myself ever going back to an index finger release

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went to a 4 finger Thumb years back and never looked back... I shoot better now than ever ....I now use a TruBAll Boss X, super clean, accurate release when it fires .... I'll mess with a strap/buckle from time to time, but TP is always hanging around, it ends up going back in the dresser drawer .. I always hunt with the 4 finger Boss X
 

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I don't like being strapped down. So I made a handle for my gator release as seen in pic. But it was easier to nock loose as it doesn't spring closed. I came across a truball with broken strap and changed to Dloop and love it.
2014-10-03_09.19.47.jpg
 

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I've shot handhelds for years but last year I started to develop elbow and wrist pain so I switched to a wrist strap and the pain is no longer there. I attached a wrist strap to my Stan Perfex and sometimes I shoot with a Keeton using my middle finger. Both work well for me.
 
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