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My riser is an older Hoyt Eclipse and the string, ... came out of my toolbox, I think it's B50. Medium SF carbon/foam limbs. Hoyt's recommended BH is 21.5 to 23.5 cm with "standard limbs", which I am assuming means Hoyt limbs.

I had a noticeable "tock" on release. So noticeable that I tried the deodorant on the fletching trick to see where the contact was occurring. Not. So I copied the kid next to me and started cranking on the string. at 25 cm it got less and at 25.5 I get a nice "thungg", like a string on a bass fiddle. Great, you might say.

Am I destroying something by this BH? Is it a consequence of the "non-standard" SF limbs? Will a different string material change things? I intend to have a couple of strings made of more modern material. Soon.
 

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Charles -

No, you can't "hurt" a bow with too tall a brace height, but you may loose some performance, and if you need (not want) a brace height that tall to tune, your arrows may be too stiff. The 25" Eclipse riser + medium limbs (68" bow), typically likes brace height between 8.5" and 9", with the right arrows.

Viper1 out.
 

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B50 (dacron) strings tend to be noisy.

Try a no-stretch material starting at 8.75”, and you can test +/- 1/4”, as Viper said.
 

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I think you absolutely CAN hurt your bow by going beyond brace height.

There. It just had to be said.

If it doesn't work with what the engineers designed it for, I suspect you better be smarter than the engineers who designed it.

That "tock" is a strong sign that something in your system isn't right. Probably an arrow that isn't spined right. Or a horrible release.

If you have a coach, what did he/she say before you asked here?
 

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B50 (dacron) strings tend to be noisy.

Try a no-stretch material starting at 8.75”, and you can test +/- 1/4”, as Viper said.
My experience has been the opposite. Non stretch strings are way louder than dacron. Especially when a little out of tune.
 

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DC -

My experience as well.

Dark -

Most (as in just about all) production laminated bows are over built to have a few extra inches of brace height. Some can handle considerably more. What engineers do is design for optimization AND safety, so while going outside of a recommended BH range may hurt performance, it really shouldn't hurt the bow. Self bows are another story, and probably shouldn't be considered on this sub-forum.

In fact, it was a pretty common practice in the 60's and 70's on the indoor circuit.

Viper1 out.
 

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My riser is an older Hoyt Eclipse and the string, ... came out of my toolbox, I think it's B50. Medium SF carbon/foam limbs. Hoyt's recommended BH is 21.5 to 23.5 cm with "standard limbs", which I am assuming means Hoyt limbs.

I had a noticeable "tock" on release. So noticeable that I tried the deodorant on the fletching trick to see where the contact was occurring. Not. So I copied the kid next to me and started cranking on the string. at 25 cm it got less and at 25.5 I get a nice "thungg", like a string on a bass fiddle. Great, you might say.

Am I destroying something by this BH? Is it a consequence of the "non-standard" SF limbs? Will a different string material change things? I intend to have a couple of strings made of more modern material. Soon.
Different strings can have a real difference in sound tone and decimal level, for sure - but you're effecting a significant noise diff with brace height and getting a much more pleasing sound, so I think the culprit is much more your draw weight/arrow spine match.

What draw weight on the fingers? What arrows? Make/model/length/spine?

Sounds like a simple case of arrows too stiff for the draw weight, and the taller brace height (from 9.25" and you twisted up to 10", which is just barely out of mngr recs, and certainly nothing to worry about safety wise) gets the arrow off the string a little sooner/straighter, so the nock 'slips' off easily instead of thwanging off at an awkward angle. You lose a little of your power thrust/speed that way, but nothing to worry about indoors, that's for sure.
 

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Okay guys,

I guess I'd prefer to fall within the safe zone that AMO standards have been governed by for some time.

A brace height of 10" is going to need a lot of twists, and that falls outside of the string design you recommended earlier, Viper. If memory serves, you prefer something with close to zero twists.

Charles, it's your bow. Honestly, I'd recommend you call Hoyt directly and speak to an engineer there, since they have a policy of lifetime warranties on certain products to the original owner.

None of us is offering you a warranty if you break your stuff...and frankly, things have changed a little since the 60s and 70s.

Sorry if I'm ruffling a few feathers. I guess I'll take that chance rather than just say "oh sure, you can't hurt it!"

Peace. :)
 

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My experience has been the opposite. Non stretch strings are way louder than dacron. Especially when a little out of tune.
agreed. and fewer twists makes the problem worse again, both due to little elasticity.


too much brace height is very unlikely to damage a bow. the limb position at brace is irrelevant, you draw the limbs way past that in normal operation. a radically high brace height will result in the limbs travelling further at full draw, but most of us are unlikely to have a draw length sufficient to cause a problem.
 

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Dark -

Okay guys,

I guess I'd prefer to fall within the safe zone that AMO standards have been governed by for some time.
AMO (ATA) set standards for manufactures to produce compatible equipment, it has little to do with safety, that wasn't their charter.

A brace height of 10" is going to need a lot of twists, and that falls outside of the string design you recommended earlier, Viper. If memory serves, you prefer something with close to zero twists.
A BH of 10" is going to require a string be made to give a BH of 10" (or more)
IIRC, I said "few, not zero", which doesn't imply "close to zero".

Charles, it's your bow. Honestly, I'd recommend you call Hoyt directly and speak to an engineer there, since they have a policy of lifetime warranties on certain products to the original owner.
If you need to call an "engineer" to figure out a BH, maybe playing with pointy sticks isn't for you. Yeah, I know, snarky, but this isn't rocket science, really.

None of us is offering you a warranty if you break your stuff...and frankly, things have changed a little since the 60s and 70s.
Not as much as you think, and if they have, should be for the better, right? Fact is, companies don't like lawsuits, and build enough of a cushion into their products to protect themselves from over zealous users. While failures have and still do happen, it's almost always due to a design or manufacturing flaw; the bow being run over by a bus or dropped off the roof, not withstanding.

Sorry if I'm ruffling a few feathers. I guess I'll take that chance rather than just say "oh sure, you can't hurt it!"
You didn't ruffle any feathers, but let's be real, if you want a zero chance of a bow breaking don't ever shoot or even string it.

Back at ya.

BTW - The above is for modern (1960's and newer) laminated bows, and NOT compounds or wooden self bows.

VIper1 out.
 

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I noticed the same noise out of my brand new W&W Nano max with new Uukha limbs and a custom string from GAS bow strings. For me, it was a tuning issue. If you had older all wood limbs, I would probably check if the limbs were twisted slightly. But, you say they are SF foam.. therefore that is probably not the case. If it were me, I would retune the bow with a limb block line gauge, set the BH back to around 22.5-23 cm, check the draw wt and make sure your arrows are at least close to the recommended spine.

You may find that your limbs may need a minor adjustment within the pockets or that you need to change point weight on your arrows.
 
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