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Aggravated an old shoulder injury, so I took a full two weeks rest from shooting. Shot 35 arrows this morning and the shoulder felt fine. But, experienced something that I did not expect. I expected that aiming would take a little time to get back, but not the case. What did not "feel" correct was the shot sequence, especially settling down after anchor. What was your experience after a short break in shooting?
 

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Corripe Cervisiam
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I've taken short and long breaks in shooting due to injuries.

Its worth mentioning, when you feel some thing or injury coming on, its worth dealing with ASAP. I let an elbow get chronic and it was a 2 year rabbit hole that ended in surgery.

It usually takes me a few shots to get back into expanding into my shot even after a short layoff.

______
 

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Brian -

When you take time off, the natural tendency is to return to your base habits.
When you stopped shooting, the shot sequence/hold was just falling into place.
It wasn't your "norm" as yet.

Just go back to doing it by the numbers.

After a nearly 3 month self-quarantine (and closed ranges), it took me about two weeks to get back.
For me it was muscle strength/steadiness on the shot.
Not 100% yet, but close.

Viper1 out.
 

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I took 3 months off. Or close to for my shoulder this spring. I'm back up to a dozen and a half arrows a practice session four or five days a week. Should be gtg soon. The shoulder healed and now working on stamina.
Age and injury require patience I don't have.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
 

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I have only been shooting traditional for about a year, but I took a week off because I noticed that my form was beginning to suffer from fatigue. After the break my shooting has been 100% better.
 

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I have taken time off for shoulder as well in the past. I think that muscle memory is still there but the fine tune control of it is (as Viper mentioned) just not set yet or has to be relearned. Some things I was working on before the "vacation" I had to learn over again. It took a while. Even laying off for several days it seems it takes time to get the finer points down again. Like throwing a baseball, you can not do that for a years but still you can pick one up a do a decent job of getting it to its destination-- but you are not ready to be the pitcher.
 

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Two weeks is really not a long time especially if you typically shoot on regular basis. Life unfortunately has a way of trumping archery from time to time and attimes for a lot longer than we might like. A month or longer and archery strength diminishes at a fairly rapid rate. The loss of finger callus tells me I need to get back to the bow string and if it has been a while as can happen during the winter months I have learned not to expect a whole lot of accuracy until my strength comes back. For some reason I still have to shot a 50# recurve bow? Building up to shoot 50 bale arrows at that draw weight after a month or two off takes me over a month.
 

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Two weeks is really not a long time especially if you typically shoot on regular basis. Life unfortunately has a way of trumping archery from time to time and attimes for a lot longer than we might like. A month or longer and archery strength diminishes at a fairly rapid rate. The loss of finger callus tells me I need to get back to the bow string and if it has been a while as can happen during the winter months I have learned not to expect a whole lot of accuracy until my strength comes back. For some reason I still have to shot a 50# recurve bow? Building up to shoot 50 bale arrows at that draw weight after a month or two off takes me over a month.
For me it is a long time and it does have an effect. Maybe you are one of the lucky ones or maybe I am one of the unlucky ones but a week off has its effects for me.
 

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A few days off for me has its affects. Has to do with health conditions and age. Just expect if you’re off your normal practice routines it will have an impact. Whether it’s a minor or a major impact is a very personal evaluation. Two weeks, a few days of several months is still time away from a usually normal routine.
I’m sure for some it’s no big deal at all but for others, yours truly included, it’s a very big deal.
Nick
 

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I found that after 8 months off for a frozen shoulder that my execution was in good shape, in fact, I saw improvements in target panic issues. What I found difficult to get back was my shooting fitness.

I was also returning to climbing at the same time which may have been an issue.

I had a good shot sequence to follow. I think the reason my execution did not suffer is that I really needed the break and the injury forced me to take it.

I had gone through periods of over training, especially when I was shooting FITA. Over training causes mental as well as physical fatigue.

I came back with a fresh mind.

Now I am nursing fresh injuries, to my knee from getting back to my workout routine, and my other shoulder from getting back to climbing before the lock down.
 

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Hank - I agree with returning with a fresh mind. Sometimes a little break is great not only for the body, but mind as well. Experienced that with downhill skiing. Two days straight of downhill skiing is murder on my knees and thigh muscles. Mixed it up with cross country skiing over the last few years, and really look forward more than ever to each. Same with sailing - I love to get out on the big boat but often a day in the kayak is a nice change of pace, different mindset.
 

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From a physical standpoint the heavier the draw weight the longer the blank bailing to achieve the strength/endurance to be relaxed and execute at full draw. There is no escaping that. The other important component of shooting the bow and is the mental aspect. During an absence from shooting doesn't stop me from randomly picking a spot on something and putting an arrow in it. At work I might appear to be taking a stretch break at my desk when actually I am sending arrows into door knob key holes. Walks on the production floor usually involve an imaginary shot arrow and a distance estimate and walk off. The away from shooting visualizations are beneficial confidence builders when it comes time to straddle the line or touch the stake.
 
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