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Hey all,

I am somewhat of a novice recurve shooter. I don't always have access to go to a range as much as I want or a way to make my own. I know you should never dry fire a bow but is it ok to draw the bow to anchor without releasing to work on stance and form? Are there any other practice techniques to do at home w/o actually releasing an arrow?
 

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Look up a "form master"
 

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Lowered expectations
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Yes, it's OK to do that, but it really would be a lot more beneficial to actually shoot the arrow.

Drawing without completing the shot is only part of the process, and probably not the most important part. Think of a golfer practicing a swing, but only going as far as the backswing and stopping.

Try to practice with completed shots. You can do it at home. The distance doesn't have to be more than a couple of feet. You can put up a bag target on the wall.



Now, somebody is going to probably say something about the Korean way of teaching beginners, where they don't even let the student shoot the arrow for the first few weeks or months of instruction. No comment, other than to say, if you have a qualified coach, do what they tell you to do.
 

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Corripe Cervisiam
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I shoot a fair amount of blind bale...at about 6 paces..... grooving in parts of my shot.

I like to shoot one arrow at different distances in prep for a hunt....

one of the guys here had a good suggestion a couple years ago that I took to heart and its helped me; Don't shoot too quick. Wait a little bit between shots. It forces you to concentrate on each shot.
 

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Mins, Gillo, Uukha, Dryad, Caribow user. ILF fan, WA3D instinctive competitor
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Learning to love the "boring" parts is a good thing.

Bailing is always good, working on specifics (Knowing what you need to work on is nice) Form master is useful.

I do lots of 18m stuff regularly despite mostly being a 3D shooter, usually working on something/ getting used to something and I do walk backs from next to nothing to beyond WA3D distances.
I have a bunch of 3D's off my back deck which, to be fair rarely get shot at barring a few at the end of a session. I see better improvement and consistency from my other practice drills
 

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if you can't get to the range, or set up a target, try something like a shot trainer. Basically, it attaches to your arm and bow string, and takes most of the energy of the shot. The arrow lands a few feet away (best done with a blanket on the floor, with a solid wall as back-up).
 

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Have you thought about getting a target for indoors? You can purchase a crossbow decocking target for under $20. Simply set the target up high enough that your natural draw height will be centered in the middle of the target. As "marcelxl" mentioned most all of us could use more boring practice. You could work on your shot sequence daily and likely benefit tremendously.

Until you get a target draw your bow both right and left handed for solid exercise. Good luck and stick with it my friend :)
 

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ot -

Seeing as you said "traditional", I would consider the following:

Spend as much time on the Internet, especially U-tube, as you do shooting. The guys who do these videos have a cell phone and an Internet connection.

Bow weight is important, see what your comfortable shooting and then double it (at least). If you have a compound history, match the recurve weight to your PEAK weight.

Real trad shooters shoot BARE fingers, don't be a sissy with a glove or worse, a tab and forget the arm guards, unless they make a fashion statement.

Make sure your equipment is matched, most arrow "spine charts are way off, since you're "trad" just buy the stiffest arrows you can and load up as much head weight as possible. As for fletching, the bigger the better.

Stay away from "target" guys, total waste of time, IMHO, with all that hitting the middle of the target and all.

Make sure you look the part.
1. If you don't have beard, grow one (if female, just do a mustache).
2. Flannel jackets and a fedora can be had at most "trad" shoots. Used is better than new.
3. Chewing (and spitting) tabacee is optional.
4. Arrow are pronounced "arras".
Remember, looking the part is more important than anything else.

OK, now that I've had some fun with ya...

Some of the advice is above is OK and some not.
While you can learn some stuff without actually live firing, it's not easy and certainly not optimal. No need to go into why at this point.
With my NEW students, I require two shooting sessions per week, one with me and one on their own. These are typically one hour each, since a new shooter usually can't handle more than that. If you can't set aside that much time, then consider either holding off until you can or spend your range time with an instructor or knowledgeable shooter who can show you the ropes AND check in on you from time to time.

Viper1 out.
 

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Hey all,

I am somewhat of a novice recurve shooter. I don't always have access to go to a range as much as I want or a way to make my own. I know you should never dry fire a bow but is it ok to draw the bow to anchor without releasing to work on stance and form? Are there any other practice techniques to do at home w/o actually releasing an arrow?
There are training devices as has been mentioned. I would not dry draw my bow tho, since there is always a chance of accidental release and since the release is probably one of the most critical issues to learn all you are doing is getting used to the wt of the bow-- not bad of course but you are not aiming anything and don't get to work proper release techniques. On the cheap I use rubber tubing tied in a circle you can draw that back to full draw, work on transfer, sighting down the tube (tho not the same as an arrow) then work on smooth back tension release while pushing the "bow" forward. Of course it is not the same as the real bow and arrow but it gives you a chance to work on set up and release and muscle memory so that when it comes to bow time you are in a better place....... and it is very cheap.
 
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