Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
513 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have been using a wrist release from day 1 (2012) every draw from either of my bows has been with my Scott Caliper Wrist release. I purchase a Scott Exxus 3 finger thumb release on Ebay should arrive tomorrow. I chose Scott because of the warranty factor. As I stated before I have never used a thumb release but have seen them used at my range and You Tube. Is the transition very tough?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
18,640 Posts
It can be.... do not draw towards your face... I draw towards my chest some then come up and anchor.... DONT LET GO of the thing....mine went down range several times as I was learning it .....keep your thumb away from the trigger ....... I like a heavy trigger on all mine... Ive used the Truball Extreme(caliper head) and Chappy Boss(Talon head) for many years and just got a Boss X(caliper head) and like the Chappy, the release is clean and crisp, I love the thing !! Once you learn yours, you'll never want to go back to a wrist strap.... Take your time, learn your shot procedure and form and have fun ....good luck !!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,065 Posts
I would highly recommend that you shoot a PM to Shawn Padgett who goes by his last name "Padgett" as his AT handle. I was pondering the same change at this time last year after battling a wrist release for a few years. Padgett was very informative and helpful as I got started and through the transition process, plus his web articles offer insights into higher level shooting practices. I actually got started in late May of 2015 and after a couple weeks with an ill-fitting hand held release, bought a Scott Exxus as well and have been shooting them for the past 8 months. My shooting form, consistency and confidence have greatly improved due to getting started right and having a plan. It is not an easy or quick fix, but it is a lasting and very worthwhile process if you are in it for the long haul.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,771 Posts
It was a pretty big deal for me. Finding g and getting used to a new anchor point was the tuff part for me. Now I can go
Back and forth without issue on the same bow
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
513 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
It was a pretty big deal for me. Finding g and getting used to a new anchor point was the tuff part for me. Now I can go
Back and forth without issue on the same bow
Did you have to acquire a lower anchor point? I'm thinking that's where my problem lies. I straining to find a sight picture in my peep.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
18,640 Posts
Come to full draw to a anchor you feel comfortable with....move your peep after you find your anchor ....you will have to re adjust your sight a tad 'prolly... and maybe will have to twist your string to realign the peep....find your comfortable anchor !!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,065 Posts
I started by Googling 'anchor points using a hand held release' and studied the photos. Most seemed to invert the draw hand so the "V" between the index and middle finger is nested in the corner of the jaw with the pinky at the top. It took a few sessions for that to feel even remotely comfortable, but I kept at it. As for your peep positioning......get close to your backstop, draw to anchor with your eyes closed, settle firmly into your anchor and then open your eyes.....that is where your peep should be. Don't position your head to fit your peep, but rather position your peep to fit the natural position of your head. It is also vital to develop a proper "firing engine" by which you activate the thumb peg without squeezing it off. Some advocate back tension, but that is a very broad and often misunderstood term. I learned from Padgett to lightly place my thumb on the trigger while keeping my index and middle fingers pretty static, then slowly rotating with my ring finger as I pulled firmly against the wall. The release simply goes off if you learn to do this right and repeatedly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,312 Posts
I pretty much mastered my thumb release after two shots - very easy to get used to and I'm sorry I didn't try one sooner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
681 Posts
I just did this a few days ago and it wasn't too difficult. It felt weird my first 20 shots or so but it wasn't that bad of a transition.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
513 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Transitioning from a wrist release to a handheld thumb release

Had a pretty good session today. Shot the Exxus approx. 2 hrs. Arrows hitting to the right but the wind was coming in l to r arrow placement wasn't the issue. I was able to acquire a sight picture through my peep and utilize my sight no lost arrows and no target misses (knock on wood) and no slips today. I hit myself in the mouth yesterday. My anchor point is the 1st and 2nd knuckle valley wedged into the rear of my lower jaw directly in line with right ear lobe.(considerably lower than with my wrist release) I am not able to achieve full rotation so the thumb would be at 6:00 o'clock, 7:30 - 8:00 is best I can achieve. Twisting my arm up-side-down doesn't seem natural but I'm thinking muscle memory will start kicking in in a few months of shooting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
513 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I would highly recommend that you shoot a PM to Shawn Padgett who goes by his last name "Padgett" as his AT handle. I was pondering the same change at this time last year after battling a wrist release for a few years. Padgett was very informative and helpful as I got started and through the transition process, plus his web articles offer insights into higher level shooting practices. I actually got started in late May of 2015 and after a couple weeks with an ill-fitting hand held release, bought a Scott Exxus as well and have been shooting them for the past 8 months. My shooting form, consistency and confidence have greatly improved due to getting started right and having a plan. It is not an easy or quick fix, but it is a lasting and very worthwhile process if you are in it for the long haul.
I contacted Padgett some of the best best advice I've gotten in a while. He is the solution to my problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,716 Posts
Could you copy and past his info so I do t have to bother him also?

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
513 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Could you copy and past his info so I do t have to bother him also?

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
You can message him. His board name is Padgett. He is very knowledgeable about archery
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,825 Posts
The transition is easy. Took my about 2 shots and new I'd never go back to wrist release.
Easy for some, others not so much. If someone is a trigger puncher that won't change with a thumb release and they'll have the same problems.

I agree with the second part though. The first time I shot with a thumb release and saw my groups get tighter I said I'm never going back. Tried a wrist release again the other day and it felt really uncomfortable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,058 Posts
Did you have to acquire a lower anchor point? I'm thinking that's where my problem lies. I straining to find a sight picture in my peep.
Your anchor point will definitely change. I did the same this past season. Been shooting a wrist style release since I first picked up a bow nearly 30 years ago. It takes a little time to get used to it and I went through 3-4 different thumb releases but I'm hooked now and love the way it feels and shoots. I really like the fact I can leave it attached to my D-loop and be ready instantly for a shot opportunity. I practiced at very close range getting used to drawing with it and releasing with a surprise release. I mean like just a few feet away from the target to make sure nothing went wrong. I'd also close my eyes and make sure time and time again I could hit my new anchor after I moved my peep quite a bit and when I opened my eyes I'd be looking perfectly through my peep.

I actually didn't like the Scott Exxus at all. It was the first one I tried because my wrist releases were all Scott. I went to an easier, cheaper one to practice with first in the Trufire 4 finger. I then did more research and decided to spend some money and try the Stan Shootoff 4-Finger and man is it awesome. It is nite and day in the crispness of the release and adjustability. But in reality they all worked fine. I killed my biggest buck to date with the Stan this year and just love having it hang from my string on ready for a shot.
 

·
Bowhunter Extraordinaire
Joined
·
2,642 Posts
In for information. I also picked up a thumb release... First shot in the backyard went through the fence :tongue: no kidding
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,277 Posts
Did you have to acquire a lower anchor point? I'm thinking that's where my problem lies. I straining to find a sight picture in my peep.
I suggest you get a kisser button and set it up using your index finger. Once set, draw the bow with your new handheld and use the kisser and peep to know you are where you should be and where your hand contacts your face is what it is. I am constantly switching between several models of releases, both index finger and handhelds. The kisser button helps me tremendously.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
273 Posts
Check out nock on pod casts. I listened to them and that's when I came out with a perfect repeatable anchor point when switching over last year.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top