Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,635 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I cooked up my first pieces of my boar i killed this weekend and it was delicious!!

I cooked them in kabobs and had them smothered with bbq sauce. after eating about six chunks i cut one open to check it out and the meat was extreemly pink. I thaught it cooked long enough, almost overcooked buy i guess not.

Being the hypochondriac that i am i decided to investigate online and learned that trichinosis a parasitic infection in the body is essentially eliminated in the USA, EXCEPT FOR IN WILD PIGS AND BEAR, now I have completely convinced myself and am freaking out,

Anybody ever hear of cases of trichinosis in hunters from eating pig or bear meat?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,743 Posts
We have killed and ate 2-3 pigs a year...since I was 12 and 42 years later...I am not dead, and no one in my family is....never even been sick from eating wild pork
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
Yes, bears and hawgs carry trichinosis, but as long as you cook the meat long enough (160-180 degrees I think) there's no worries! I eat both all the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,997 Posts
There are other diseases that hogs carry that scare me. One of the diseases transfers through fluid exchange like a cut on you and contact with the hog. I am thinking that this could be transferred months after the kill but I don't know. I would like to hog hunt but until I know what I am doing I guess that I better just stick to deer and other game.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,635 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Ttt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,394 Posts
I think Burcilosis (sp) is the disease that has me worried.
No need to worry..thats what female bovine get that makes them have a miscarriage....those cows go to slaughter and make burger just like any other cow...another name for it is called "bangs"...females are vacinated for it and the ears are tatooed so they can be checked to see if they have had the shot...eat away it wont hurt you...buffalo also can contact this here in the US....JMO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,387 Posts
Hogs

We have taken from 7 to 22 guys for the last 11 years, killing between 20 and 40 hogs per year. We throw all the meat together, and split it evenly after processing. All those people and their families and never has anyone been sick. At least from the hog meat :D
 

·
Alien Mafia Member
Joined
·
3,765 Posts
No need to worry..thats what female bovine get that makes them have a miscarriage....those cows go to slaughter and make burger just like any other cow...another name for it is called "bangs"...females are vacinated for it and the ears are tatooed so they can be checked to see if they have had the shot...eat away it wont hurt you...buffalo also can contact this here in the US....JMO
Not quite that simple.


Brucellosis, also called Bang's disease, or undulant fever, is a highly contagious zoonosis caused by ingestion of unsterilized milk or meat from infected animals, or close contact with their secretions.
Brucellosis in humans induces inconstant fevers, sweating, weakness, anaemia, headaches, depression and muscular and bodily pain.
The symptoms are like those associated with many other febrile diseases, but with emphasis on muscular pain and sweating. The duration of the disease can vary from a few weeks to many months or even years. In the first stage of the disease, septicaemia occurs
The disease's other effects are highly variable and may include granulomatous hepatitis, arthritis, anaemia, meningitis and various neurological orders
Antibiotics are effective against Brucella bacteria. However, the use of more than one antibiotic is needed for several weeks, because the bacteria incubate within cells.
Swine brucellosis is a contagious disease in pigs caused by the bacteria, Brucella suis. The disease spreads in semen during breeding and by ingestion, inhalation, or eye contact with bacteria in milk, reproductive fluids, placenta, aborted fetuses and urine. The disease primarily occurs in adult pigs which show non-specific infertility, abortion or lack of sexual drive. Boars can show signs of orchitis, lameness, arthritis, abscesses and posterior paralysis. There is no treatment for the disease and no effective vaccine.

It was the main reason I decided not to hog hunt on my last trip to Florida.
According to my buddy there, it is rampant amongst the wild pig population,
and he personally knew 2 people who contracted it.

Kev
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,586 Posts
I've consumed 16 wild hogs, 2 Buffalo, 2 Bears & a ton of other wild game. I'm still here & headed out to Bowhunt Hogs in about 2 weeks. Oh, I've drank from running mountain streams also.

Yes, it's possible but so is getting hit by a car.

Common sence when cooking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,866 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,844 Posts
Anybody ever hear of cases of trichinosis in hunters from eating pig or bear meat?
I am sorry in advance. This is not going to make you feel better.

Not to scare you, but I will never eat bear again for this reason (unless I cooked it). A buddy of my dad's got Trichinosis from eating bear pepperoni that wasn't cooked/smoked at a high enough temp. to kill the cells. The cysts got into his organs and muscles and he eventually died a painful death, and there was nothing they could do for him.

Here is some info that I found on Trichinosis: (The best news I saw was that if you freeze the meat at sub-zero temps for 3-4 weeks the cells die!)

Trichinosis is infection with the roundworm Trichinella spiralis.

Symptoms:

* Abdominal discomfort
* Cramping
* Diarrhea
* Fever
* Muscle pain (especially muscle pain with breathing, chewing, or using large muscles)

Treatment:

Mebendazole or albendazole can be used to treat infections in the intestines. There is no specific treatment for trichinosis once the larvae have invaded the muscles. The cysts remain viable for years. Pain killers can help relieve muscle soreness.

Causes:

Trichinosis is a disease caused by eating undercooked meat containing cysts of Trichinella spiralis. Trichinella spiralis can be found in pork, bear, walrus, fox, rat, horse, and lion meat.

Wild animals, especially carnivores (meat eaters) or omnivores (animals that eat both meat and plants), should be considered a possible source of roundworm disease. Domestic meat animals raised specifically for eating under USDA guidelines and inspection can be considered safe.

Trichinosis is a common infection worldwide, but is seldom seen in the United States because of strict rules regarding the feeding of domestic animals and meat-processing inspections.

When a person eats meat from an infected animal, Trichinella cysts break open in the intestines and grow into adult roundworms.

The roundworms produce other worms that move through the gut wall and into the bloodstream. These organisms tend to invade muscle tissues, including the heart and diaphragm (the breathing muscle under the lungs). They can also affect the lungs and brain.

There are approximately 40 cases of trichinosis each year in the U.S.
Tests & diagnosis

The patient may have a history of having eaten rare or uncooked pork. Tests to diagnose this condition include:

* Complete blood count (CBC)
* CPK level (an enzyme found in muscle cells)
* Muscle biopsy
* Serology studies

Prognosis:

Most people with trichinosis have no symptoms and the infection goes away by itself. More severe infections may be more difficult to treat, especially if the lungs, the heart, or the brain is involved.
Prevention

Pork and meat from wild animals should be cooked until well done (no traces of pink). Freezing at subzero temperatures (Fahrenheit) for 3 to 4 weeks will kill the organism. Smoking, salting, or drying meat are not reliable methods of killing the organism that causes this infection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
827 Posts
I try and use a thermometer when cooking pork and bear but I am sure at some times I have ate some that was a little under cooked and have never got sick. I am a firm believer in if you think your gonna be sick you will be sick so I would say don't worry about it and if ya drink go buy a fifth of the good stuff cook up some more of that boar and enjoy! your always safe when ya wash it down with hard A LOL :darkbeer:
 

·
Corripe Cervisiam
Joined
·
22,156 Posts
Slim and Kev, very factual and informative - kudos

Don't know how I lasted this long eating that for over 30 years
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,844 Posts
Slim and Kev, very factual and informative - kudos

Don't know how I lasted this long eating that for over 30 years
The odds of getting sick are low. I just don't think it's worth it to eat two animals I don't even really like. If I kill them, someone else who wants it will be getting the meat. lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
799 Posts
It is generally considered safe to cook wild pork and bear meat at least medium. Unless the bear or hog has access to garbage waste.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top