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Discussion Starter #1
So many people are paper tuning? I have seen laser, levels, rod and walk back tuning and it will work but here is my story:
If the center of you bow is the burger button hole, why don’t we use it? If the string and cam/idler are the center of the bow vertically, why don’t we use it?
Take a look at the Rest Assured Tuning Tool and see how it works!
Why do we throw our bows out of time to make an arrow shoot?
Why don’t we find an arrow that will shoot with our bows in time?
I do some vertical line walk back tuning only to see if my arrow selection is right.
The first thing I would do is to purchase a Rest Assured and set my rest up RIGHT and try the arrow. I have to see if it will hit a vertical line at 5 feet and then walk back 50 yards and see if the arrow still hits the line at that distance, if so than you are set. If the arrow hit left of the vertical line at 50 yards you can try adding or taking away point weight until the arrow hit its mark. Some arrows to stiff and require a little more weight up front to help brake the spine(stiffness). Once you have found the magic arrow you are ready some of the best shooting you have ever done.
http://www.xteam1.com/restassured.htm
 

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edthearcher
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question

I can see where this gadget will align your arrow center as far as up and down goes, but how does it align your rest as to your string center lies on your riser. such as hoyt recomends 3/4 center and mathews may be 1/16 more or less and martin may have a diffrent setting ??????
 

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edthearcher said:
I can see where this gadget will align your arrow center as far as up and down goes, but how does it align your rest as to your string center lies on your riser. such as hoyt recomends 3/4 center and mathews may be 1/16 more or less and martin may have a diffrent setting ??????

I guess the idea is that when the arrow is running true parallel to the riser ie that metal square is touching the shaft squarely in the lower pictures, then the arrow must be running parallel to that all the way back to the string so centered on the string, and parallel @ the riser = centered.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Rest Assured

88 PS190
You got it:)
 

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If this is the way it works, why not just do a center adjustment by using a caliper to set the arrow at the same distance from the riser at the front and back of the riser while nocked????

guess that could be finicky and slow, but surely better than marking the limbs and eyeballing it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Rest Assured

Caliper cost?
Rest Assured cost?
What if the riser thickness is different from front to back?
The burger button hole is always drilled a true 90.
 

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I'll just answer one part. The rest mounting hole (berger button hole) is not in the physical cneter of the bow. To check it use a bow square attached to the string. Set it so it bisects the berger hole. Now measure from the square to each axle (top and bottom).

I'll bet you see a difference of about 1 1/4" to 1 3/4".

Oh, what the heck. The string groove on most cams is not in the cneter of the bow. It is offset to the left for a right handed bow. The idler is in the cneter of the top limb so the string actually angles occros the bow from cam to idler, but is still off to the left side slightly where it passes a normal nocking point location.

NOW, take a look at your cam and idler. Do they have any "cam-lean"? If so then they aren't tracking right and are in essence making the string oscillate sideways as the string travels forward. And what if you have a bow that doesn't have level nock travel? Then you basically have a nocking point that is moving both up and down and sideways during the shot.

The only production bows that I am aware of that the string and cams are physically cnetered on the riser are those with the Martin Nitrous cams.

The what do you do to compensate for hand torque? No two people hold a bow the exact same way for every shot. And if you grip a bow at all then torque is created.

Then there is the act of anchoring against the face. Many people don't know it, but with today's high letoff bows a person can anchor into the face hard enough to actually create torque in the string where it contacts the face.

OK, I'll go away for now.
 
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