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Tuning Down the center.

1305 Views 34 Replies 11 Participants Last post by  SteveR
I really wish my Diamond Marquis would bare shaft paper tune down the center instead of to the right. I read of a number of people having the same issue. Maybe we are just perfectionists but when you pay the dough the satisfaction and piece of mind is nice to have. Has anyone in my situation found the solution.
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This my opinion and there others out that will disagree--------why are you going to set your bow up with a bare shaft then put fletching on the arrow and change it up again????????????? Never made sense to me. The two arrows are different flight dynamics, to me it proves nothing. I want to set my bow for the way I shoot with the equipment like I'm going to use with it. So you get it to shoot bare shaft, when you add fletching it changes the way it flies, just common sense. Again just my .02.:tongue::wink::)
 

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I really wish my Diamond Marquis would bare shaft paper tune down the center instead of to the right. I read of a number of people having the same issue. Maybe we are just perfectionists but when you pay the dough the satisfaction and piece of mind is nice to have. Has anyone in my situation found the solution.
My bow is setup dead center, but I don't even shoot through paper. I tune with fixed blade broadheads to 50 yards and that get's your nock height perfect and then walkback tune to get dead center shot. Mine just ended up dead center.
 

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This my opinion and there others out that will disagree--------why are you going to set your bow up with a bare shaft then put fletching on the arrow and change it up again????????????? Never made sense to me. The two arrows are different flight dynamics, to me it proves nothing. I want to set my bow for the way I shoot with the equipment like I'm going to use with it. So you get it to shoot bare shaft, when you add fletching it changes the way it flies, just common sense. Again just my .02.:tongue::wink::)
The reason why you do it is to take clearance issues out of the equation. Once you are tuned bareshaft, tuning with fletching should be close if not right on. If you are getting a bad tear then it's probably a clearance issue. That's why you do it.
 

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My bow is setup dead center, but I don't even shoot through paper. I tune with fixed blade broadheads to 50 yards and that get's your nock height perfect and then walkback tune to get dead center shot. Mine just ended up dead center.
Do you have a Marquis, scottparker?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The bare shaft tuning helps you to see tears that your fletchings can correct almost instantly. I am sure that it has some inperfections but so does any method. It helps me get a bullet hole very quickly, and if my fletchings are not contacting my rest I will get a perfect hole with my fletchings on the first try when I switch over to them.

Scott Parker, I did not get the flow of your method. Do you start with field points then switch to fixed blades. What type of bow are you shooting. I feel that the trouble that I am having is due to some type of flaw in the limbs or bow. Yeah, it very well could be me, but when a bow is built properly they are (usually) easy to tune. If something is off with the bow you have to tune to the inperfection or get rid of your vertical tear and set the arrow down the center and deal with the imperfections in the bow. Sometimes it is cam lean and a few twists will cure it, sometimes the bow needs to be adjusted back to specs. My bow's timing is set and the ata is right on. My brace height is off by almost a quarter of an inch. The only twisting that I have down to the bow was put two twists in the string and one twist in the cable to reduce the overall length 1/16" down to spec. My brace height is almost 1/4" short. I was thinking that this might be due to the fact that not all limbs are made equal. They vary some in how they flex. I know I still have a lot to learn but I am at a loss with this one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
John

I believe that if you were going that route you would put twists in the right yoke string.
 

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Would you twist the left side to correct cam lean or would you do it to induce the cam lean in order to shoot down the center? Does that make sense. I hope you understand what I'm trying to say.
Hey John, I'm assuming you're having trouble with a left tear by the looks of your set-up. I would start by eye-balling your rest to center shot and then start adding twists to the left side of the yoke (looking at the bow from behind). I would start with 1 twist at a time and then only 1/2 twists when you get close to a perfect tear. It shouldn't take many twists.

It seems to me its better to pay attention to cam lean at full draw rather than when the bow isn't drawn.

This has worked well for me and hopefully it will for you.

Oh, one more thought, have you checked to see if your arrows are properly spined?
 

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you are way too far inside. anything you get now is due to vane contact with cables and the shelf. start over, eyeball your center. you may have to change your grip up a little. i wouldnt be so quick to start twisting on things either. move your rest in smaller increments this time and pay very close attention to your grip.
 

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is this a test?


if it is, i'm guessin the answers havent been correct.

i got a good idea whats wrong.
 

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Hey John, I'm assuming you're having trouble with a left tear by the looks of your set-up. I would start by eye-balling your rest to center shot and then start adding twists to the left side of the yoke (looking at the bow from behind). I would start with 1 twist at a time and then only 1/2 twists when you get close to a perfect tear. It shouldn't take many twists.

It seems to me its better to pay attention to cam lean at full draw rather than when the bow isn't drawn.

This has worked well for me and hopefully it will for you.

Oh, one more thought, have you checked to see if your arrows are properly spined?
My arrows are good. I'm shooting Easton Excel 340's at 27.5 inches w/ 100 grain tips.

I've kind of taken a similar yet different approach. I've been letting some twist out of the right side yoke. My cam lean was pretty good before, and as I'm doing this it is adding some lean to it. However, my tears are getting better. I got tired for the night and may try some more tomorrow. So do you think that adding some cam lean like I'm doing is going to be a problem?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
John,

Thank you for adding to this post. I hope that we can keep it going until we get our question answered. I called the number at the bottom of Rock Monkey's post and it was to an archery shop owned by a 74 year old gentlemen who is truely a gem. He found it amusing that his business number was on here. He suggested that we make sure that we move our rest in very small increments to the right although I am not sure that will make a difference. He also suggested that nocks that are too tight could cause this problem. He said that tight nocks on a lighter arrow can make the problem even worse.

I am playing phone tag with bowtech and I am going to call back right now and let you know what I find out.

Keep Trying!
 

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let's answer some questions first.....

are you trying to tune out a left tear?

how is your grip? do you 'choke the hell' out of it or is the contour of the grip on the thumb side of your lifeline? your hand should be relaxed and fingers loose. you could also be trying to grab the bow at the shot....if you dont use a wrist sling, maybe it's a good idea.

get your idler lean to be a tiny bit off. when you lay the straight edge/arrow on the side of the idler, start out with the straight edge a small amount, no more than 1/16" difference between idler and end of straight edge.

tagging along with what daleb1 first mentioned about dynamic spine, you have about 25grs (very healthy guess) less on the nock end of the shaft, which will equate to a stiffer shaft, altho you are shooting 340's, you are a bit on the heavy side of the spine scales. if possible, weigh your bare shaft and compare it to your fletched shaft. if you can, try to make up the difference by using a luminock for the weight or put some modeling clay or plumber's putty equal to the weight difference in the nock. if you cant get all the putty in there, close enuff is better than none.

start out with the center of the rest fork around 3/4" from the riser and try that. if you are comfortable with your ability to hold within the confines of the paper tuner, close your eyes before you take the shot and dont open them until after the release goes off. you could be artificially influencing the shot by trying to see the tear before it happens. concentrate on as near perfect form as possible

back to the tuning out a left tear.....on drop aways, to tune out a left tear, you chase the nock. it's opposite of shoot-thru tuning. most tuning pamphlets and guides dont get it right. i wont go into the deep explanation, but the only portion of the arrow that is guided by the rest is the pointed end....the nock end just follows. if the arrow isnt straight at full draw, it wont be straight at all.

let me know how this goes. something has got to work.

dean's a grand old man. he's been around for a long time and he's seen his fair share of headaches and gimmicks and combinations of the two.
 

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Good input guys!

MichHunter, I'm curious to see what Bowtech says. This has been a frustrating week to say the least trying to figure this out.

Rock Monkey, what you said about tuning a drop away is interesting. I've never heard that before, but it makes sense. By chasing the nock, do you mean to move the rest left on a left tear?

Here is something I learned. I had ordered a new string and it just happened to get here today. I put it on tonight, set it up, tuned a little bit. My tears are so much better. Not perfect, but better. I'm kind of wondering if my old string was causing lean problems. I'm going to walkback tune tomorrow and see how it is shooting.
 
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