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Discussion Starter #1
alright everyone, have some questions for you.

First off, I am LEFT-HANDED, so i need some tuning advice and i am not 100% sure what transfers over to lefties and what is reversed from rh shooters.

I did some bareshaft tuning with my full-length arrows today. Well the result was that my bareshafts were hitting low and to the left of my fletched arrows.

Now what exactly does this mean? I am thinking it is the reverse of a right-handed shooter when it comes to the arrows being to the left. So that means my spine is too weak and that i need to either:
1. decrease point weight (shooting 100 grains right now)
2. wider plate
3. shorten the arrows
4. switch from fast-flight to dacron.

Now hopefully those are the right things to do, and I wanted to double check that. Now as for the arrows hitting low, that probably means that my nocking point is too high correct?

Now next I have another problem. On my shelf I am getting a lot of wear on the outside (too the right) of my rug. Is this because of my weak arrows? If I fix my problems with my arrows will this problem most likely go away?

Thanks everyone
 

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Lemme see..

alright everyone, have some questions for you.

First off, I am LEFT-HANDED, so i need some tuning advice and i am not 100% sure what transfers over to lefties and what is reversed from rh shooters.

I did some bareshaft tuning with my full-length arrows today. Well the result was that my bareshafts were hitting low and to the left of my fletched arrows.

Now what exactly does this mean? I am thinking it is the reverse of a right-handed shooter when it comes to the arrows being to the left. So that means my spine is too weak and that i need to either:
1. decrease point weight (shooting 100 grains right now)
2. wider plate
3. shorten the arrows
4. switch from fast-flight to dacron.

Now hopefully those are the right things to do, and I wanted to double check that. Now as for the arrows hitting low, that probably means that my nocking point is too high correct?

Now next I have another problem. On my shelf I am getting a lot of wear on the outside (too the right) of my rug. Is this because of my weak arrows? If I fix my problems with my arrows will this problem most likely go away?

Thanks everyone
If I'm recalling correctly... for a LH archer... your bare shaft being left is the opposite from the RH archer. Therefore, your brace height would be a little too high and in need of being relaxed a little. And... when tuning the bow's adjustments... do ONE type of tuning at a time. Get it dialed in laterally (if that's where you begin) and THEN work on dialing in elevation adjustments.

If your arrows' spines are too weak, lighten the tip weight... if they're heavy for your bow's draw weight... add weight.

Now... let's see if I have a handle on it, or if someone blows me out of the water with a list of corrections. :shade:
 

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Well a question for you, are you pretty new at this? if so bare shaft testing isn't going to help much.. It is the opposite for a lefty but you are not looking so much for where the arrow impacts , you look at how it flies . How far away the target is makes a difference ETC ETC......

But as I said if you haven't been shooting stick bows long don't worry about bare shaft testing yet. You need to perfect your form and release before you can bare shaft test with any hope of getting anything from it. Randy
 

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Yes lower your nock 1/16 and shoot again. Get your nock hight set 1st.
Yes your arrow are showing weak. Shorten the arrow by 1/2 inch.
Let us know what arrow and bow weight you are shooting and your draw length.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well a question for you, are you pretty new at this? if so bare shaft testing isn't going to help much.. It is the opposite for a lefty but you are not looking so much for where the arrow impacts , you look at how it flies . How far away the target is makes a difference ETC ETC......

But as I said if you haven't been shooting stick bows long don't worry about bare shaft testing yet. You need to perfect your form and release before you can bare shaft test with any hope of getting anything from it. Randy
well i know my form isn't great, but i am consistently getting low left bareshafts. i bet i did 6 sets of 6 arrows (3 fletched, 3 bare), and the fletched where always within a 3-4" group at 10-15 yards and the bareshaft were always within a 4-5" group at 10-15 yards. so i am pretty sure my form is staying consistent enough to realize that it is both weak and nocking point is off.

I think what I will do is start by fixing my height problems, than trim a half-inch at a time off of my arrows until my fletched and bare shafts are flying close to each other. like was said... 1 thing at a time.
 

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If you know your form isn't great then your release is likely the same. Why mess with serious tuning that might go the other way when you perfect the first two ? But hey it's your money for arrows so knock yourself out.. Randy
 

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Always confirm your findings BEFORE YOU CUT your shafts by changing point weight.You can get a false reading from riser contact.If your shafts are really too weak,less weight will help and more will make it worse.If however you get an opposite effect or no change you probably have a contact issue.

A shaft that is way too stiff can bounce and show weak.Same thing with nock point,a too low nock can bounce and show too high.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Always confirm your findings BEFORE YOU CUT your shafts by changing point weight.You can get a false reading from riser contact.If your shafts are really too weak,less weight will help and more will make it worse.If however you get an opposite effect or no change you probably have a contact issue.

A shaft that is way too stiff can bounce and show weak.Same thing with nock point,a too low nock can bounce and show too high.
i am shooting some beman mfx 500's at full length. I will try a lighter tip (85 grains) and maybe putting a bunch of tape on the end of a couple of arrows to add some weight to see if that stiffens it up.

I really think my form is probably alright ravensgait. I just don't see how you expect me to shoot arrows that are poorly tuned for my bow compared to arrows that are more closely tuned for my bow. Cutting off an inch or two isn't going to be wasting an arrow, my fiance shoots .500 spine so if i wreck a dozen then she just gets new arrows thats all.

Oh yeah, here is the info you wanted Snuffer
Bow: black swan hybrid ~50# at 28"
arrow: beman mfx 500 full length with 100 grain tips and 5" feathers
 

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The point is that what you are seeing your arrows do could be caused in all or part by your form and release. Your bow is pretty hot (as in fast) and a little touchy to shoot, they are great bows but one that isn't the ideal learning bow, a bit heavy in draw weight for a newbie as well which makes it worse to learn on and thus to tune. But as I said it is your money..

At least once a week we see a question about tuning arrows . Most are from people with little experience shooting recurves and longbows. They hear something about tuning an arrow and just have to do that what ever it is. Well until you have the basics of shooting down pat and I mean really have them. Then tuning an arrow is a waste of your time and money. If your arrows fly where you want them too and don't seem to be doing to many tricks in the process then they'll be fine till you really learn to shoot. Once you have that down then you can fine tune everything . Or you can tune now and again in a month then the next month buy more arrows because these wont tune now and tune again. Maybe you get my point now.

Now if you want to learn quickly put it away get something lighter in weight say around 30# and 64" long and learn on it. Once you have it together then pull out that Swan and you'll be surprised at what a truly nice bow you have. Randy
 

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Discussion Starter #10
i have been shooting my 30# recurve and my 38# recurve for about 2-3 months now, that is why i am starting to shoot my black swan more
 

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but you are not looking so much for where the arrow impacts , you look at how it flies .
Your info is incorrect according to O.L.Adcock.

www.bowmaker.net

Now to get started, step back 15 or so yards and start shooting 3 or 4 bare shafts mixed with 3 or 4 identical fletched shafts aiming for a spot. Odds are they are not going to fly very well so we need to start making adjustments to straighten them out. You are going to make adjustments based on where the groups are in relation to each other, not on whether the nocks are kicking one way or another. IGNORE SHAFT ANGLE! It is irrelevant.
IMHO, this bareshaft testing is a major pita. I thank my lucky stars that I just bought a used arrow saw for $75.00 cause I have been back and forth back and forth cutting my 1916's. I first tried a string made with 8125 and then I lowered my brace height to 7 inches. I have now now changed to a Dacron string with my brace height around 7.5 cause my arrows still show weak. I can't give up any tip weight cause I still need some decent overall arrow weight. Etc etc etc. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
well i messed with the stuff today and made my arrows weaker (dropped froma 100 grain tip up front to a 85 grain and put 6 layers of tape on the back end) and they flew considerably better.

Adjusted the height and the bareshafts are shooting close to the fletched arrows (within 6 inches most of the time)

The big thing is that my arrows are shooting tail-end up, and i adjusted the nocking point a lot each way (from 0 up to 1.6") and i cannot get rid of the tail-end up on the bare shafts. does this have anything to do with my shooting 3 under?
 

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and i adjusted the nocking point a lot each way (from 0 up to 1.6") and i cannot get rid of the tail-end up on the bare shafts. does this have anything to do with my shooting 3 under?
I shoot three under and I don't have a nock high problem. It could still be your nocking point or your target may be causing it.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I shoot three under and I don't have a nock high problem. It could still be your nocking point or your target may be causing it.
the targets are not the greatest, the fletched arrows are coming in pretty straight, but you can see when you shoot that the tail starts high. I really don't want to go much higher because it seems like i am way up there already.
 

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well i messed with the stuff today and made my arrows weaker (dropped froma 100 grain tip up front to a 85 grain and put 6 layers of tape on the back end) and they flew considerably better.

Adjusted the height and the bareshafts are shooting close to the fletched arrows (within 6 inches most of the time)

The big thing is that my arrows are shooting tail-end up, and i adjusted the nocking point a lot each way (from 0 up to 1.6") and i cannot get rid of the tail-end up on the bare shafts. does this have anything to do with my shooting 3 under?

By lowering tip weight or adding weight to the rear you are making the arrow stiffer.If you have confirmed that the arrow needs to be stiffer it's ok to trim in small ammounts 1/4" to 1/2" at a time.

I agree with Ravensgait that you shouldn't drive yourself nuts tuning right now.Only alter your shaft after you have shot several groups and know for sure what needs to be done.

One other thing.You need to weigh the arrow and make sure it is not lighter than the bowyers recommended min.
 
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