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Tuning?

533 Views 6 Replies 5 Participants Last post by  Flying Dutchman
I suck at trying to tune my recurve.. Just get that out of the way.. haha.. I have a 58" Grizzly at 55".. Im drawing 27" but on the scale it showed I was pulling the full 55#.. I have my brace height right around 8".. I have my knocking point a little high, but I still seem to notice an up and down wobble in flight.. I also notice fletching contact on my shelf on the factory bear hair.. Do I need to worry about this??? Im hitting pretty well at 20 yards with the bow (my personal limit for hunting) as I can keep them all in the lung area of my target.. Ive played around with split fingers and 3 under and have recently decided 3 under with a glove is my most consistant method.. Anyways, my main question is this.. How do I KNOW my arrows are tuned correctly? Im shooting a GT traditional 3555 with a 100grain 2 blade steel force broadheads.. I really dont know if anything im doing is just personal error, or tuning.. Maybe you guys can help me out?? (I dont know why, but my last couple posts seemed to have gone un-noticed without much advice.. Oh yeah, I need string silencers bad, thing sounds like a banjo right now haha, any recommendations? How about the factory string? I reserved the center serving because the plastic stuff didnt seem to be holding up very well..

Help me turn my set up into the best tuned set up possible for myself (without spending a bunch of money, I need gas money to hunt! ha).. Ive learned ALOT in the compound world from this sight, and im hoping ya`ll can help me out as well.. BTW, I have read up on a few of the websites recommended around here for tuning, but I still suck!
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Can't say much without actualy being there to help out,but here's how I set my own bow up for three under,and get the bow virtualy silent, and with exellent arrow flight.
First off I set my brace hight,8 inches seems to work well for "most" recurves.
The nocking point does effect noise as well as arrow flight,and definatly if your shooting three under.
I tye on a dacron nocking point and don't pull it up too tight,this is so I can wind it up or down the string as I go.
I always set it up about 1/2 an inch above square to start,and I don't use a bow square,I just go by eye and how the bow sounds an feels.
I then go out an shoot over a long distance with no real thought as to where the arrow is going.
I have a 20 acre paddock behind my house so I can do this.
I shoot high and simply watch the arrow in flight.
This makes it very easy to see any up an down or side to side movement.
From 1/2 inch above square I always need to go higher,and my current favourite bow is set 3/4 of an inch above square.
Both level flight an noise seem related,you get one right,they both come right at the same time.
For fish tailing,which is usualy caused by under or over spined arrows,you can fine tune with a plunger,or by putting harder or softer strike plate material on the strike plate.
This is for fine tuning only,your arrow has to be in the ball park for it to work properly.
My acid test for arrow flight is that a bare shaft will land in the same group as my fletched arrows,with them all hitting square an level.
After I've got that sorted,I then add string silencers,,,,although if it's tuned right the bow won't be making a lot of noise anyway,the silencers are just the cream.
I think your always going to get at lest a little fletching wear,but you'll get less shooting cock feather in,,,,,,,just try it ok!
I have two mates shooting Grizzlys,,both virtualy silent,both very accurate.
Cheers.
 

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Mr -

Tuning, IMHO, is important but you have to understand it's limits as well. First and foremost is that you can only tune as well as you can shoot, ie, your form may be the limiting factor and we can't tell that from here. For example a sticky ring finger may give you an up/down ossicilation. Second, shootintg off the shelf WILL make a bow harder (but not impossible) to tune. At the very least the NP will have to be (usually) higher than you might expect. Sticking a match stick or dowel under the rug "might" help.

Other thing is that while spine issues are typically up/down and NP left/right, a really funky spine can give you false reading on the up/down as well.

Now, how to tell when you're tuned. For hunting rigs, it really doesn't have to be "perfect". Using OL bareshaft planning method (www.bowmaker.net), getting the bare shafts within a inch or two of the fletched ones is MORE than enough.

Viper1 out.
 

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Hey Viper,

Your post shouldn't rather say:

Other thing is that while spine issues are typically left/right and NP up/down, a really funky spine can give you false reading on the up/down as well.

I might be wrong of course...

Cheers
 

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odie -

Thanks buddy, yup. My typing is reaching new heights ...

Viper1 out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the suggestions guys.. I will play with my NP, maybe its not quite high enough..

Am I on track with these arrows though? Should I change anything? Heavier weight up front? Anything?
 

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"How do I KNOW my arrows are tuned correctly?"

Try papertuning. Adjust one paper of a newspaper on a wooden frame, just like a painting. Any tape will do, but make sure the surface is tight. Make also sure that the paper is at shoulder height, so you can shoot straight forward. Place something (a foam board) behind it, to catch your arrows. Stand ten feet before it and shoot an arrow through the paper. Then take a look at the hole. Ideal would be that you have a small round hole, with the signature of your fletching. If you see an horizontally stripe, your spine of the arrow isn't correct. To the left means to low. If you see an vertical stripe, the nockpoint of your string isn't at the right hight. If you see an diagonal stripe, you have a combination.
This method is terribly efficient, doesn't kost anything and is easy to do at home!
Keep on shooting and adjusting till you have the ideal round hole. I did this so for my cedar arrows and by now there isn't much I miss after I tuned my arrows. .....

Hope this helps
 
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