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This might be a silly question but bear with me. My Samick Sage has a Brace height of 7"1/8. I would like that to be closer to 8". When you twist the string a ton of times, how do you get it to stay twisted when you take down the bow to put it in its case? Do you have to re-twist it everytime you use it to keep the 8"?

Sorry - I'm a newbie to traditional archery
 

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This might be a silly question but bear with me. My Samick Sage has a Brace height of 7"1/8. I would like that to be closer to 8". When you twist the string a ton of times, how do you get it to stay twisted when you take down the bow to put it in its case? Do you have to re-twist it everytime you use it to keep the 8"?

Sorry - I'm a newbie to traditional archery
Well when I unstring my bow, it is only from the nock on the top limb... the bottom limb, if its loose, tie it, band it, or tape it... my friend slipped a finger tip from some kind of tight glove over it.... I use rubber bands.... :)
 

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You twist the string in the direction that tightens the center serving. If it's an endless loop string (and made correctly) that should also tighten the loop binding servings. If that's not the case the center serving takes priority. On a flemish splice splice string, you keep going in the direction it was originally twisted.

On a take down bow it can get a little trickier, since the string is usually removed. If the string was made to the correct length, it shouldn't need a lot of twists and a good application of wax should keep the twists in place. Some folks do things like slip one end of the string in the opposite loop to keep the twists in.

Viper1 out.
 

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I -

You twist the string in the direction that tightens the center serving. If it's an endless loop string (and made correctly) that should also tighten the loop binding servings. If that's not the case the center serving takes priority. On a flemish splice splice string, you keep going in the direction it was originally twisted.

On a take down bow it can get a little trickier, since the string is usually removed. If the string was made to the correct length, it shouldn't need a lot of twists and a good application of wax should keep the twists in place. Some folks do things like slip one end of the string in the opposite loop to keep the twists in.

Viper1 out.
Well if I'm taking the bow apart and removing the string, I just take string, loop it clockwise and then paperclip or clip the ends together... don't remember ever having any problems with that learned system. I also put them into a baggie and off we go... :)

Aloha... :cool::beer:
 

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The short general answer is that once the string has been shot-in and been vigorously waxed under tension, I do not expect my strings to untwist beyond a turn or two, if that. So…as it appears your concern may be having to repeat the same amount of twists, it is not only unlikely but what would probably happen first, in response to a “ton” of twists, is that the string would most likely start folding over on itself.

That said, “shot-in and vigorously waxed under tension” usually makes my strings, with a relatively high twist count, behave more like sticks than strings when I take them off the bow. And, in part, I attribute this to using sticky (cake) wax throughout my string construction process and/or prior to twisting to brace height, if I did not make the string. (I use tube bowstring wax as a top coat to reduce the amount of stickiness on the surface.)

To that I would add that endless and Flemish strings are apt to respond a little differently to a high twist count, as the twisting is going to want to migrate under the serving, and endless/continuous loop strings have more serving locations. Anyhow…sounds like you could be in the market for a slightly shorter string and what you have is a potential “back-up” string. I’ve found it is always good practice to have a spare string on hand.

Good Luck and Enjoy, Rick.
 
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