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I know we've discussed similar topics on here before but I want to expand on it a bit and get feedback from those that solely rely on one vehicle to get it done. I see guys in the PNW and Idaho when I'm there for work that bring a full size diesel hauling ATVS, campers etc....I need an all in one vehicle. It needs to get me several hours down the highway (with decent mileage) then get me back on some remote forest roads and back home. I currently drive a 1998 Toyota Tacoma Reg cab 4x4 (2.7 liter) with 427,xxx miles (original motor, tranny, clutch etc btw!. What say you guys? Can a Wrangler get it done or should I stick with a pickup? I'll be buying new btw as I drive the shot out of something before getting rid of it.
 

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If you want something new get a new taco, I had a 99' and wish I never sold it. I sold it to my step father and now his dodge collects dust. Snow rain or shine it has no issues, narrow for clearance on trails. He replaced the motor for around $1500? factory new, now it's unstoppable.
 

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I say new body style crew cab Tacoma with the 6.5' bed and a canopy. It will haul much better than the old one and has significantly more room. Plus, 18-20 mph is not bad for a truck.

I have a 1996 extended cab V6 Tacoma with a canopy and it's been a great rig. Almost 300k and runs like a top. Someday when I have to buy a 'new' truck, I'll be getting exactly what I recommended above. :)
 

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I had a 2010 Taco TRD-Offroad double cab with an ARE topper (and 235/85/16 cooper at3's) and I would've killed for 20mpg lol. It wasn't worth the crap gas mileage and higher payment, back to the 1st gen I went.
 

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Why not keep the Taco, put a bumper pull on it and get a rig that's comfortable to tow it down the road. That way you're not tearing up your nice new rig in the woods, especially with what they cost new. And BTW, Taco's hold their values ridiculously well, even with high mileage. I wish I had kept my 01 Taco ext cab TRD,SR5, stepside. Loved that truck.

With that said, I used my 2000 Expedition this year and it worked out great. I got to camp, took the coolers out, rolled out my bedroll and sleeping bag and slept comfortably in the back. In the morning, I threw everything back inside and rolled down forest roads pretty nice. I wont roll it down a nasty forest road though as that's what the atv's are for. You can usually find them with 100k miles for around $6k and up.

If you want new, I'd say a 4 door Wrangler, Tacoma, or 4Runner. Preferably Toyota IMHO.
 

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I had a 2010 Taco TRD-Offroad double cab with an ARE topper (and 235/85/16 cooper at3's) and I would've killed for 20mpg lol. It wasn't worth the crap gas mileage and higher payment, back to the 1st gen I went.
Unfortunately that's what happens to most trucks when you put on a tire that's only 1.5" bigger than stock. Did it have any kind of aftermarket lift or just the factory suspension? I went from 20 mpg on my 4" lifted 1996 to about 17-18 when I went with a 32" tire (basically exactly what you had at 31.7").

I have a few buddies with the new 4x4 V6 Tacoma's (stock w/ automatics). They are all getting at least 18 mpg on average.
 

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The best I could get in my Taco was 21-23 on the highway at 75mph or under. It was kinda funny that the 06 Superduty crewcab diesel I traded it in for got the same mileage but was twice the size of the Taco.
 

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The best I could get in my Taco was 21-23 on the highway at 75mph or under. It was kinda funny that the 06 Superduty crewcab diesel I traded it in for got the same mileage but was twice the size of the Taco.
That's what everyone always says about diesels but every one I have ever seen can never do better than 18 mpg in a crew cab 4x4. My dad has owned three Super Duty Ford's and they started out around 16 mph and slowly deteriorated to about 12 mpg. Plus, fuel is about $1 more per gallon up here. :(
 

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That's what everyone always says about diesels but every one I have ever seen can never do better than 18 mpg in a crew cab 4x4. My dad has owned three Super Duty Ford's and they started out around 16 mph and slowly deteriorated to about 12 mpg. Plus, fuel is about $1 more per gallon up here. :(
Yeah, mine was a CC, shortbed 4x4 with the 6.blow. I was getting 21-23 until Ford had a recall for an EGR reprogram and then it dropped to 13 city, 18 Highway. Decent for a truck that size but man was I pissed. Fuels the same pricing here. Knowing what I know about diesels, I'll stick with gas. I love the power they make but the parts and repair bills are too expensive. It seems everytime a friend of mine has to fix something on their diesel truck it's at least a grand.

The best my Expedition gets is 16mpg if I keep it under 80. That's without pulling a trailer.
 

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That's what everyone always says about diesels but every one I have ever seen can never do better than 18 mpg in a crew cab 4x4. My dad has owned three Super Duty Ford's and they started out around 16 mph and slowly deteriorated to about 12 mpg. Plus, fuel is about $1 more per gallon up here. :(
2008 super duty here likes to hover at 12, with only 60,000 miles. Funny thing is, when it pulls the trailer at 70mph, it jumps to 14. But with all the new emissions for the exhaust that is what you get.

Need to change the exhaust, get a cool air intake and maybe a chip. Does pretty well for the off road trips I do. But a Toyota is hard to beat.
 

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Smilin' Bob
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I always have a Toyota (upgraded the 84 to a '03 dbl cab taco 8 years ago.) and a full size diesel. I prefer the toy's for hunting.

The only drawback is not being able to chain the front up and it's a little cramped when using it to haul in "the big camp" (wall tents, poles, tables, and all the other items for luxury). I'm thinking of building an expedition trailer to solve my problem. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I knew the taco was the best option... Was hoping to get Jeep as a recommendation. I'd love to have one even after I swore I'd never own another Chrysler product. New Toyota makes the most sense, damn it ;)
 

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There just isn't room in a jeep for your camping gear and a successful hunt. That said, I drive a four door Nissan Fromtier that has a small lift and 285/75-16, just enough to drop the mileage from 22 to 17. It gets cramped, but it's paid off and running great. It will likely be replaced with a Tacoma someday.
 

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My Elk Hunting Home
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That's what everyone always says about diesels but every one I have ever seen can never do better than 18 mpg in a crew cab 4x4.
18 isn't bad on an almost 8k pound truck.:wink: Especially with a crew cab and 8 foot bed. The mileage in my 2001 Powerstroke is totally dependent on the fuel. I've gotten as high as 22mpg doing 80 on the highway and as low as 15. But considering my '89 Toyota absolutely HATES ethanol gas and drops down to 15mpg with it, the Powerstroke is a no-brainer on the highway. In 2012 I averaged 18.2mpg for the entire hunting season with the Powerstroke. That included 4wd and highway miles for the season at over 1800 miles driven. I can live with that. But the big truck just can't go where I need it to go all the time, so I tow the Toyota behind it sometimes.

But back to the original question.........If I got rid of both trucks and could only have one, I'd probably get the Tundra. If it was just me and the wife, I'd get the crewcab Tacoma and a trailer to haul my luxury camp. Like Bob said.......it's tough to get all that stuff in a small bed. I'd even need the trailer with the Tundra. You get used to an 8 foot bed and it's hard to fit all that stuff in a smaller truck. And......some of the places I like to go I couldn't even get the Tundra to I'm sure. At least I can chain up all 4 on my old Toyota........can't do that with the new ones or my Powerstroke.
 

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18 isn't bad on an almost 8k pound truck.:wink: Especially with a crew cab and 8 foot bed. The mileage in my 2001 Powerstroke is totally dependent on the fuel. I've gotten as high as 22mpg doing 80 on the highway and as low as 15. But considering my '89 Toyota absolutely HATES ethanol gas and drops down to 15mpg with it, the Powerstroke is a no-brainer on the highway. In 2012 I averaged 18.2mpg for the entire hunting season with the Powerstroke. That included 4wd and highway miles for the season at over 1800 miles driven. I can live with that. But the big truck just can't go where I need it to go all the time, so I tow the Toyota behind it sometimes.

But back to the original question.........If I got rid of both trucks and could only have one, I'd probably get the Tundra. If it was just me and the wife, I'd get the crewcab Tacoma and a trailer to haul my luxury camp. Like Bob said.......it's tough to get all that stuff in a small bed. I'd even need the trailer with the Tundra. You get used to an 8 foot bed and it's hard to fit all that stuff in a smaller truck. And......some of the places I like to go I couldn't even get the Tundra to I'm sure. At least I can chain up all 4 on my old Toyota........can't do that with the new ones or my Powerstroke.
Why is that?....... clearance issues? We've been chaining up the front of my friends 2010 powerstroke and haven't torn anything up that I know of.
 
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