Archery Talk Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have young bowhunting friend who got all excited when he saw a picture of his camo clothes on his trail camera at night. He said they looked like really bright and that he used UV resistant clothes wash. My take is that his camera has an infrared flash which may show the clothing as really bright but that it has nothing to do with the UV that deer are supposed to see.
What say ye?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,523 Posts
Great first post; I'm wondering the same thing.

I walk past my IR cams at night and all my camo (which looks pretty good to me in daylight) looks like total tinfoil at night in the camera's IR illumination.

Edited to add: This should probably be in the Bowhunting forums; don't be surprised if the moderators move it for you...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
920 Posts
IR cams detect heat, or your body exciting low energy wavelengths in your clothing. The reason you look white is due to your body heating your clothes...

UV is a high energy wavelength and would not be visible in the IR spectra range. You would have to have a very strong energy source to illuminate the UV active material (i.e., the sun)
 

·
Hunter of many things
Joined
·
12,113 Posts
IR cams detect heat, or your body exciting low energy wavelengths in your clothing. The reason you look white is due to your body heating your clothes...

UV is a high energy wavelength and would not be visible in the IR spectra range. You would have to have a very strong energy source to illuminate the UV active material (i.e., the sun)
Interesting. ^^^ So do you need a UV light shining on your camo to see if it glows?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,254 Posts
UV [ultra-violet] and IR [infra-red] are on opposite ends of the visible light spectrum. UV wavelength is approximately 10nm-400nm and IR is in the 700nm-1mm range. Reason IR cameras pick up body heat is those temps are in the same general range as IR wavelengths.

Chris, have you tried looking at your camo under a black light?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,222 Posts
Opposite ends of the spectrum, IR is long wavelength and not many animals take advantage of it for vision, UV is short wavelength and a lot of animals can see into the UV spectrum. IR is off the red end and UV is off the blue end. I wouldn't worry about being lit up like a Christmas tree in IR, it won't tell you anything about how you look under UV
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,031 Posts
UV [ultra-violet] and IR [infra-red] are on opposite ends of the visible light spectrum. UV wavelength is approximately 10nm-400nm and IR is in the 700nm-1mm range. Reason IR cameras pick up body heat is those temps are in the same general range as IR wavelengths.

Chris, have you tried looking at your camo under a black light?

Wouldnt Black light inspection only show the flourescent/flourescing agents in the camo material(should it exist)????? ...interesting tho.
Ill have to try this @ work
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
155 Posts
Ok I’m calling the heat method a false statement because my jacket glows like a white jacket and it is wind proof water resistant material but but my pants that are cloth are still dark and doesn’t change colors at night


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,254 Posts
Wouldnt Black light inspection only show the flourescent/flourescing agents in the camo material(should it exist)????? ...interesting tho.
Ill have to try this @ work


I think most blacklights are typically a UV-A light.
 

·
Shootingairborne
Joined
·
10,575 Posts
IR cams detect heat, or your body exciting low energy wavelengths in your clothing. The reason you look white is due to your body heating your clothes...

UV is a high energy wavelength and would not be visible in the IR spectra range. You would have to have a very strong energy source to illuminate the UV active material (i.e., the sun)
This is interesting I didn't know IR picked up heat. I have used them with night vision in the military. We have thermal scopes that had two settings white or black HOT! That picked up heat.
 

·
Hunter of many things
Joined
·
12,113 Posts
UV [ultra-violet] and IR [infra-red] are on opposite ends of the visible light spectrum. UV wavelength is approximately 10nm-400nm and IR is in the 700nm-1mm range. Reason IR cameras pick up body heat is those temps are in the same general range as IR wavelengths.

Chris, have you tried looking at your camo under a black light?
No i havent. Not sure if i want to haha. I do buy quality camo and use a uv blocking wash so im hoping it is minimal if any.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,222 Posts
Your camera is sensitive to the IR flash, your camo lights up like that because it's reflective to the IR flash. Some materials are more reflective than others, your camera isn't going to pick up a difference in body heat it's not nearly sensitive enough for that. It's pretty much exactly the same as the old Sony handycam that had night vision, turning that on removed the IR filter in the optic stack and turned on an IR illuminator. Basically it's a flashlight on the long wavelength end of the spectrum that you can't see but as far as your camera is concerned it's perfectly visible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,860 Posts
Walk past the in set of BDU’s and see how it looks. You’ll see the whole camo pattern minus the color. They have anti-reflective/Infared
Dyes to still work through night vision. I have a jet black carhart jacket that is pure white in the pictures.

Has nothing to do with heat. These are not thermal imagers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
510 Posts
Just my opinion, but I think any hunter that has ever washed their clothing in their daily use washing machine, has some UV brighteners in them. Yes, you should continue to use non UV detergent but unless you scrub the drum every single time you've ever washed your clothes, you're not going to avoid having it stick to your clothes a bit assuming you use a regular detergent for you non-hunting clothes. That being said, I've shot numerous deer in old solid black and brown hoodies that were washed in tide up until before the day I went hunting and I threw them in with some dead down wind detergent. Play the wind and sit still, that's more important.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top