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Any recommended cookbooks or reads? I'll be honest and get some flak for this, I'm not a meat hunter. I don't shoot does and strictly after the horns because I just don't like venison unless its kielbasa or jerky. That said, not a drop of meat goes to waste as I end up giving it almost all away. I want to like it and try different things. Anything out there like a prep process guide or something that helped you?
 

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Look up Hank Shaw... Some of his recipes are a little involved, but if you like cooking they are damn good.

I mostly grind everything besides the backstraps, tenderloins and sirloin steaks and we use it like we would burger for just about anything. Burgers, Tacos, soups, enchiladas, spaghetti sauce, etc. We have had friends and family over that have no idea what they are eating as the burger usually takes on the flavor of the other ingredients.
 

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"Buck, Buck, Moose" by Hank Shaw as mentioned

Or the also mentioned "The Meateater" by Rinella

I use both and they are very good.
 

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Maybe you could bump this towards a recipe thread? There are some wild turkey recipe threads in the AT archives that offered some really interesting ideas.

First off.....venison has it's own flavor....as does beef, pork, chicken and turkey. Thanksgiving dinner it would be foolish to refuse to eat a roast turkey because it doesn't taste like a beef steak....so why do folks turn their nose up at a plate of venison because it doesn't taste like beef? Go to Red Lobster and expect salmon to taste like scallops or snow crab? My wife doesn't like venison because her dad one year killed A deer.....and her mom lied to the family....said it was beef. She knew it wasn't and thought it tasted "funny".....tainted her for life.

Secondly.....how a deer is killed, recovered and processed makes a big difference in the flavor. I'm betting you never ate beef that was gut shot, left to lay overnight, recovered 15 hours later and then hauled around in 60* weather with a bag of ice in it's chest cavity. The FDA would have someone's scalp for doing such a thing.....but it is fairly common on AT and "real life" with deer. Also deer in farm country tend to taste better than swamp or woodland deer that eat mainly browse rather than corn, beans, etc.

A longtime hunting buddy processes my deer and we typically get mostly burger. My wife can eat it in soup, chili, tacos and such....plus we give it to folks at church. I also get the loins in 1# packages to either grill or put in a crock pot with an onion and cream of mushroom soup.
 

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First - Written out recipe's aren't really my thing. I cook by feel/taste but I'll give some guidelines based on what I do...

For this recipe you NEED a good instant read thermometer. Thermapen MK4 is my suggestion. Getting internal temps correct with venison is a requirement if you want good, tender, moist, flavorful meat.

Get a 6-8" long hunk of back strap, clean it up real nice. Let it sit on the counter for an hour or so to let it come up to room temp. Coarse kosher salt and fresh ground pepper. Get a good amount of salt on there, it's a big chunk of meat.

Pre-heat the oven to 300ºF and put a foil lined pan in there.

You will want a cast iron skillet OR a black steel pan. Get it on the stove top, and get it ripping hot.

Sear that back strap on all sides. I usually give it about a minute per side with the pan on high heat.

Now put the back strap in the oven on the foil lined pan. (start the onion recipe below now in this same pan)

There is no time for this. You must check internal temps. Remove the backstrap from the oven when the temp in the very middle of the meat reaches about 125. It probably won't take long. Check it every 5 or so minutes. A leave in oven safe thermometer makes this easier if you have one.

When the internal temp reaches 125ºF, remove and tent with foil for at least 5 minutes. I usually let it rest until my onions are done. When ready, you're going to slice against the grain. The grain runs the long ways in the back strap. So cut 90º to the long side. I cut them in quarter inch medallions and plate them nicely.


Sautéed onions:
1 very large yellow onion - Julienned (
)
3 tbsp butter
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
Montreal steak seasoning to taste
Salt/Pepper to taste

In the pan you just seared off the back strap in, let the pan cool down so you don't burn the butter, set to a medium heat.

Add the butter, allow to melt, and scrape the frond (that's the bits of meat that are stuck to the pan) off the bottom
Add the onions, salt, pepper, steak seasoning, and Worcestershire sauce.

Cook, stirring frequently, until the onions are dark brown


With this meal we usually do either mashed or baked potatoes, but I'm confident you can figure those out :D
 

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google venison recipes, use the one you like.
I make tacos, shepard's pie, soup (beef broth, potatoes, butter beans, corn, field peas, carrots, deer meat) those are my favorites.
 

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At one time there was a venison cookbook here on AT that someone put together from a thread with members fav recipes but I think it went away with everyone’s feedback.
 

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Look up Hank Shaw... Some of his recipes are a little involved, but if you like cooking they are damn good.

I mostly grind everything besides the backstraps, tenderloins and sirloin steaks and we use it like we would burger for just about anything. Burgers, Tacos, soups, enchiladas, spaghetti sauce, etc. We have had friends and family over that have no idea what they are eating as the burger usually takes on the flavor of the other ingredients.
+1 for Hank Shaw. In addition to his cookbooks, he has some great social media content (I'm not on FB but my wife is and she shares his stuff with me once in a while). Had one of his Elk Steak Diane recipes for dinner last night. Very good.
 

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First - Written out recipe's aren't really my thing. I cook by feel/taste but I'll give some guidelines based on what I do...

For this recipe you NEED a good instant read thermometer. Thermapen MK4 is my suggestion. Getting internal temps correct with venison is a requirement if you want good, tender, moist, flavorful meat.

Get a 6-8" long hunk of back strap, clean it up real nice. Let it sit on the counter for an hour or so to let it come up to room temp. Coarse kosher salt and fresh ground pepper. Get a good amount of salt on there, it's a big chunk of meat.

Pre-heat the oven to 300ºF and put a foil lined pan in there.

You will want a cast iron skillet OR a black steel pan. Get it on the stove top, and get it ripping hot.

Sear that back strap on all sides. I usually give it about a minute per side with the pan on high heat.

Now put the back strap in the oven on the foil lined pan. (start the onion recipe below now in this same pan)

There is no time for this. You must check internal temps. Remove the backstrap from the oven when the temp in the very middle of the meat reaches about 125. It probably won't take long. Check it every 5 or so minutes. A leave in oven safe thermometer makes this easier if you have one.

When the internal temp reaches 125ºF, remove and tent with foil for at least 5 minutes. I usually let it rest until my onions are done. When ready, you're going to slice against the grain. The grain runs the long ways in the back strap. So cut 90º to the long side. I cut them in quarter inch medallions and plate them nicely.


Sautéed onions:
1 very large yellow onion - Julienned (
)
3 tbsp butter
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
Montreal steak seasoning to taste
Salt/Pepper to taste

In the pan you just seared off the back strap in, let the pan cool down so you don't burn the butter, set to a medium heat.

Add the butter, allow to melt, and scrape the frond (that's the bits of meat that are stuck to the pan) off the bottom
Add the onions, salt, pepper, steak seasoning, and Worcestershire sauce.

Cook, stirring frequently, until the onions are dark brown


With this meal we usually do either mashed or baked potatoes, but I'm confident you can figure those out :D
I do something similar to this but I will smoke my back strap till it hits 110 IT, pull it and sear in a cast iron pan with butter, whole garlic cloves, and a couple springs of rosemary until it hits 125, then rest for 5-10 mins. Use the butter drippings over the top of the meat after it is sliced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks, I ordered the buck buck moose book. Alot of burger recipes call for just ground venison. Wouldn't you need some fat thrown in? Else wise I imagine it's like chewing on a michelin tire it's so dry
 

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I do something similar to this but I will smoke my back strap till it hits 110 IT, pull it and sear in a cast iron pan with butter, whole garlic cloves, and a couple springs of rosemary until it hits 125, then rest for 5-10 mins. Use the butter drippings over the top of the meat after it is sliced.
Nothing wrong with that at all!

I've done reverse sear on the grill, but not in the smoker yet.
 
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