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Wasting time.

508 Views 5 Replies 5 Participants Last post by  Theelkhunter
I had plenty of free time today so I did a little field test of my own. The results kinda surprised me. I was under the impression that the heavier an arrow is then the more penetration you will get. Makes perfect sense to me. Anyway, I shot a Easton Axis N-fused that weighs in at 9 gpi then I shot a Carbon Express Teminator Lite Select that weighs in at 7 gpi. The Carbon Express got way more penetration and even held up longer. I shot the two arrows into a galvanized steel horse trough. The Easton went through the first side and didnt penetrate at all on the second side. The CE went through the first side and about 2 inches stuck out the back side. Probably would have got more penetration had the fletchings not got wedged in the entrance hole. Also the Easton broke on the first shot while the CE was shot into the trough 13 times before it cracked.
Next I thought about the Grim Reaper video and how they show it holding up so well. I wondered how many broadheads they shot until they got one that didnt break. After checking for myself I believe they used just one. I shot the GR through the same steel trough 3 times before it broke. I also shot a Magnus stinger 12 times through it before just a bleeder blade broke. Other than the bleeder blade it was still in "OK" condition. The tip of the Stinger was rolled over slightly but thats all. Either way both broadheads are good and Im glad I decided to put them in my arsenal.
Now I just have to rethink my choice in arrows because I switched from CE to Easton but after today I may be switching back the CE Terminators.
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the penetration also has to do with distance.. up close it hardly matters.. and you can have too much weight... the best is somewhere in the middle weights around 390-410 gr... at longer ranges is where weight becomes uperior. the lighter an object is the faster is sheds its speed so at some point the two would be identical and then the weight advantage kicks in
 

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We arent hunting steel. We are huntin animals. Try and fling some full metal jacket and see what you think:darkbeer:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I like the way the heavier ones fly, I get better groups. But... The eastons are so fragile it seems, every one I shot deer with except one broke. Im thinking of trying a different brand, maybe bemen or GT or something. Any suggestions for a truly durable arrow?
 

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I like the way the heavier ones fly, I get better groups. But... The eastons are so fragile it seems, every one I shot deer with except one broke. Im thinking of trying a different brand, maybe bemen or GT or something. Any suggestions for a truly durable arrow?
I shot the Beman Max4s for four years and really liked them. I had the same dozen the whole time.

I did my own little test like this a while back. I took a 9gr arrow with 100gr tip at 28 3/4in and a 10.4gr arrow with a 125gr tip, also at 28 3/4in. I shot 20-50yrds. I was shooting into a block target and measuring how much arrow was in the target. At 20yrds, there was not much difference. The heavier arrow started showing its weight the farther I went back. It started going in farther and the lighter arrow started to not go in as far. If i remember correctly, the total difference at 50yrds was something like 1 1/2in.
 
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