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Then he built them correct. There is no issue. Remember that that serving will travel upward, away from the slide, at draw. It won't try to go through the slide. Also, did you double check all the specs. If something is off that small gap between the serving and slide will change.

Remember, also, that string builders simply go off the specs the manufacture lists. There will be some slight variances.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Then he built them correct. There is no issue. Remember that that serving will travel upward, away from the slide, at draw. It won't try to go through the slide. Also, did you double check all the specs. If something is off that small gap between the serving and slide will change.

Remember, also, that string builders simply go off the specs the manufacture lists. There will be some slight variances.
No, that piece of serving also comes back down awfully fast and slams right into that slide. I even bought a Saunders hyper glide because they’re slicker and the passages are beveled a lot more than factory and certainly don’t chew the cable as fast. Even with the Saunders on, it felt and sounded like a zipper starting the draw. Sure some variance is acceptable, this is not to me. If it is to you, rock on.
 

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No, that piece of serving also comes back down awfully fast and slams right into that slide. I even bought a Saunders hyper glide because they’re slicker and the passages are beveled a lot more than factory and certainly don’t chew the cable as fast. Even with the Saunders on, it felt and sounded like a zipper starting the draw. Sure some variance is acceptable, this is not to me. If it is to you, rock on.
The served area going into the slide won't hurt the slide or the serving. The gears-like feeling is temporary and quickly goes away as the serving is flattened out. There will be 0.00 affect on the operation of the bow in any case.

Yes, I agree that it does look like the builder put on about 1" more serving than the old cable had, but chances are good they were going off a published/stock serving length. And an inch here and there on the serving lengths isn't a reason to throw em away.

Personally, I'd just shoot the setup as-is, since what you got is functionally a non-problem. And the hassle and time going back and forth with the builder for 1" of serving in one non-critical spot on one cable, is a lot of time not shooting your bow. Like you said, the deer won't care.

lee.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
What do you believe is wrong with the string and cable?
I paid over $100 for the set and nothing was right, ATA, brace, cam timing, draw weight, serving that extends down into my cable slide. I twisted and adjusted a lot and got everything to spec and I would’ve lived with it if the serving was clear of the slide. I don’t have the tools to re-serve this area properly under tension. I communicated this with the maker, and continued to get the same type of responses from them that I get from veritas above, snarky. That’s fine on here, but it’s not cool coming from the folks that took your money for something, and something is off about it. I got tired of the waiting and ordered from a different maker and those were dead on after only twisting the right yolk for cam lean. Haven’t heard anything else from the first maker I was curious about others folks take on it. I highly doubt veritas above would keep a set of strings on the very nice bows listed in the signature if the serving was off around the roller guides and bare cables were ran across them because the serving was short here or long there. Why is substandard expected to be the norm? Would anyone else accept this on their bow? If you bought strings for your top of the line flagship and the strings weren’t perfect would you accept it? Why should a midrange person or a budget person? Is there less attention to detail given making a string for a single cam affordable bow vs a top of the line twin or hybrid? I didn’t order budget strings. I realize people are people and can make mistakes, and I’m willing to let anyone make it right. If not, I’ll buy from somewhere else, lesson learned. If you made your own and it was not right, you’d fix it. For those with the tools or access to a shop that makes strings and is willing fix it for a fee, its doable. I have neither and like most have to order everything. What’s wrong with expecting something to be right? Jeremy and the boys at the Archery Shack got the second one right, why couldn’t the other maker? It installed and everything was dead on less setting lean on the idler.
Wood Line Sports equipment Composite material Parallel
 

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I paid over $100 for the set and nothing was right, ATA, brace, cam timing, draw weight, serving that extends down into my cable slide. I twisted and adjusted a lot and got everything to spec and I would’ve lived with it if the serving was clear of the slide. I don’t have the tools to re-serve this area properly under tension. I communicated this with the maker, and continued to get the same type of responses from them that I get from veritas above, snarky. That’s fine on here, but it’s not cool coming from the folks that took your money for something, and something is off about it. I got tired of the waiting and ordered from a different maker and those were dead on after only twisting the right yolk for cam lean. Haven’t anything else from the first maker I was curious about others folks take on it. I highly doubt veritas above would keep a set of strings on the very nice bows listed in the signature if the serving was off around the roller guides and bare cables were ran across them because the serving was short here or long there. Why is substandard expected to be the norm? Would anyone else accept this on their bow? If you bought strings for your top of the line flagship and the strings weren’t perfect would you accept it? Why should a midrange person or a budget person? Is there less attention to detail given making a string for a single cam affordable bow vs a top of the line twin or hybrid? I didn’t order budget strings. I realize people are people and can make mistakes, and I’m willing to let anyone make it right. If not, I’ll buy from somewhere else, lesson learned. If you made your own and it was not right, you’d fix it. For those with the tools or access to a shop that makes strings and is willing fix it for a fee, its doable. I have neither and like most have to order everything. What’s wrong with expecting something to be right? Jeremy and the boys at the Archery Shack got the second one right, why couldn’t the other maker? It installed and everything was dead on less setting lean on the idler. View attachment 7705944
How many strings have you replaced? Taking strings out of the package, throwing them on, and having the perfect twists on them right from the start is rare. I usually do two to three string replacements a day, so seeing something like this is pretty common. I pretty much have to add or remove twists from strings and cables to get them right. This is why dealers charge what they do to do string installs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The served area going into the slide won't hurt the slide or the serving. The gears-like feeling is temporary and quickly goes away as the serving is flattened out. There will be 0.00 affect on the operation of the bow in any case.

Yes, I agree that it does look like the builder put on about 1" more serving than the old cable had, but chances are good they were going off a published/stock serving length. And an inch here and there on the serving lengths isn't a reason to throw em away.

Personally, I'd just shoot the setup as-is, since what you got is functionally a non-problem. And the hassle and time going back and forth with the builder for 1" of serving in one non-critical spot on one cable, is a lot of time not shooting your bow. Like you said, the deer won't care.

lee.
Well I personally will not, I changed the string and cables to get ready for hunting season as the factory slide had already started eating the factory cable, I didn’t want any issues during the season. I certainly wanted none with the serving in this area. That one cable carries a heck of load. And if you haven’t noticed any of my other posts, I’d have no luck if it weren’t for bad luck, I’m definitely not going to give it a head start.
 

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I paid over $100 for the set and nothing was right, ATA, brace, cam timing, draw weight, serving that extends down into my cable slide. I twisted and adjusted a lot and got everything to spec and I would’ve lived with it if the serving was clear of the slide. I don’t have the tools to re-serve this area properly under tension. I communicated this with the maker, and continued to get the same type of responses from them that I get from veritas above, snarky. That’s fine on here, but it’s not cool coming from the folks that took your money for something, and something is off about it. I got tired of the waiting and ordered from a different maker and those were dead on after only twisting the right yolk for cam lean. Haven’t anything else from the first maker I was curious about others folks take on it. I highly doubt veritas above would keep a set of strings on the very nice bows listed in the signature if the serving was off around the roller guides and bare cables were ran across them because the serving was short here or long there. Why is substandard expected to be the norm? Would anyone else accept this on their bow? If you bought strings for your top of the line flagship and the strings weren’t perfect would you accept it? Why should a midrange person or a budget person? Is there less attention to detail given making a string for a single cam affordable bow vs a top of the line twin or hybrid? I didn’t order budget strings. I realize people are people and can make mistakes, and I’m willing to let anyone make it right. If not, I’ll buy from somewhere else, lesson learned. If you made your own and it was not right, you’d fix it. For those with the tools or access to a shop that makes strings and is willing fix it for a fee, its doable. I have neither and like most have to order everything. What’s wrong with expecting something to be right? Jeremy and the boys at the Archery Shack got the second one right, why couldn’t the other maker? It installed and everything was dead on less setting lean on the idler. View attachment 7705944
It's normal with a new string set to have to adjust the cables to get your previous dimensions.

This always has to be done after a string change.

Especially the yoke legs on a yoke cable - those will be shipped from the builder with the legs at the same length (generally speaking and how they're packaged depends on how the cable was made). Yoke legs in particular will always have to be twisted/adjusted, and usually by a considerable amount, to set the cam lean where it was. Same with ATA, brace height and cam timing.

Those are all adjustments that must be performed at installation/setup/tuning. They're not builder requirements. They just ship you the cable at the stock lengths (or whatever you specify if you custom-order them). You (or whoever installs the strings) have to adjust the cables to get your desired dimensions.

So, just get used to it :).

What I do is build my strings to factory lengths as close as I can get them. That way, I know the whole setup will be "zero'ed out" when I put the new strings on. I don't have to pay much attention to where it is before I change strings. I know it'll be very close to "nominal" with the new strings. And I then can usually just add adjustments that I know I'll need to make "by rote" without hardly needing to retune. Eg. I may memorize the lower cable will need 2 turns, and I'll just put them in when I install them. About 3/4 of the time, the first bareshaft fired out of the bow is very close to what I want and very little, if any, further adjustments need to be made.

With my Supra Max, I almost knew how many turns needed to go in the "outboard" leg and how many needed to be taken out of the other when I put on a new yoke cable.

So when you put new strings on and everything is "off", be assured that a) that's normal and b) you will have to readjust the cable lengths to get back to where you were. Just the nature of the beast when DIY'ing your own string changes.....

lee.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
How many strings have you replaced? Taking strings out of the package, throwing them on, and having the perfect twists on them right from the start is rare. I usually do two to three string replacements a day, so seeing something like this is pretty common. I pretty much have to add or remove twists from strings and cables to get them right. This is why dealers charge what they do to do string installs.
I’ve done many over the years, only 3 sets now on this bow. Ok, you’re a subject matter expert. How many twists in either direction is too many to you, for a string that was stretched at 300lbs for a specified time, then reduced to 100lbs and served, twisted to final measurement under tension? I seriously want to know. At what point in twisting either direction do you stop and say something isn’t right let’s go measure it.
 

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I’ve done many over the years, only 3 sets now on this bow. Ok, you’re a subject matter expert. How many twists in either direction is too many to you, for a string that was stretched at 300lbs for a specified time, then reduced to 100lbs and served, twisted to final measurement under tension? I seriously want to know. At what point in twisting either direction do you stop and say something isn’t right let’s go measure it.
For cables, it doesn't matter. New cables won't be different lengths by enough for you to exceed the number of twists that could endanger the cable by a long, long ways. Twist away, until you're where you want to be.

For the main string, however, assuming an approx 60" length, I have found that it depends on how much of it is served. If the cam servings are really long and there isn't much exposed string, I don't like to exceed literally 2 or 3 turns. If most of the string is exposed, OTOH, I only start getting nervous at about 5 turns. More than that, and peep rotation starts to become a possibility.

If you don't use a peep sight, though, doesn't matter. Twist away...

But others are ok with more or less risk, so that's just the way I do it....

lee.
 
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