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Discussion Starter #1
I've seen this discussed a few times and it always seems to get confused, so I want to try for a clear definition:

When we say the "top cam is advanced" or "top cam is ahead", does it mean:

A) the top cam hits the draw stop first

or

B) the top cam leaves first on the shot, meaning that it would hit the draw stop second

???????????
 

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Discussion Starter #4
interesting . . . I was thinking it was the other way around . . .

so "top cam advanced" is the opposite of "top cam leaving first" ?

I always thought this was all in reference to what happens on the the shot, not the draw ? :confused:
 

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interesting . . . I was thinking it was the other way around . . .

so "top cam advanced" is the opposite of "top cam leaving first" ?

I always thought this was all in reference to what happens on the the shot, not the draw ? :confused:
I don't think the terms "advanced" and "******ed" mean the same across the board to all archers.

In my mind, these terms are used most when setting up a bow and timing the cams. This all takes place during the draw cycle and at full draw. Therefore the terms would also apply to the cams orientation at rest through full draw.

In my mind...an advanced cam is one that is further into its draw rotation at rest and full draw than the other cam....
 

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interesting . . . I was thinking it was the other way around . . .

so "top cam advanced" is the opposite of "top cam leaving first" ?

I always thought this was all in reference to what happens on the the shot, not the draw ? :confused:
Well, since we can't really see what is happening on the shot, cam timing is usually gauged at full draw, or near to it.. if you advance the timing on your car's engine, do you move it ahead so it happens sooner? or do you move it back so it happens later?

The easiest way to judge cam timing is to draw the bow and watch which cam hits the stop first.. this cam is said to be advanced, relative to the other, which would be considered ******ed. Bottom line, if one hits first, you have to either ****** that one, or advance the other, so they both come to full rotation simultaneously. :wink:
 

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A.. it's hitting the draw stop first, or is coming to it's fully rotated position before the lower cam.
I agree. The cam is timed so that it is positionally (is that a word?) ahead of the other cam or in other words stops before the other cam at the end of the draw cycle.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I think from now on I will say "top cam hitting the stop first" so I don't confuse myself or anyone else :wink:

Well, since we can't really see what is happening on the shot, cam timing is usually gauged at full draw, or near to it.. if you advance the timing on your car's engine, do you move it ahead so it happens sooner? or do you move it back so it happens later?:
That car analogy is a great illustration of why this is confusing to me -- when you time a car you do it with respect to the direction that the engine turns when it is RUNNING, not backwards! The bow is "running" on the release not the draw . . . and we can't actually see what is happening on the shot, but we can be pretty sure that it is the same thing that happens when we let up on the draw board a little and let the cams start to rotate forward.

The easiest way to judge cam timing is to draw the bow and watch which cam hits the stop first.. . . . so they both come to full rotation simultaneously.
understand -- that makes sense; it's when somebody says they want them not the same that it gets tricky

so when somebody says "the Hoyt Cam.5 performs better when it is over-rotated" what do they mean?
 

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interesting . . . I was thinking it was the other way around . . .

so "top cam advanced" is the opposite of "top cam leaving first" ?

I always thought this was all in reference to what happens on the the shot, not the draw ? :confused:
Bert--
Keep that annalitical thought, and when you see the relationship to tiller/and the draw/shot cycle you'll know why the heck you would even make them uneven in the first place.

Think'n is a good thing as long as it doesn't take time from your shoot'n. :wink:
 
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