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Discussion Starter #1
Folks,

I am looking for a some input on what constitutes a good practice regimen. I am relatively new to archery, having not shot a bow in 40 years until the last month or so. Unfortunately I am not able to practice in my yard. The archery range is an indoor range about 20 minutes from my house. I am taking lessons from the owner.

I can't shoot every day, but try to practice twice a week. I am pretty much a recreational archer who just wants to be as good as I can be while enjoying the sport.

I am interested in your thoughts on an efficient practice session including thoughts on stretching, warm-up, shooting distances (range max is 20 yards), practice objectives, how long a practice session should be, how many arrows to shoot in total, etc.

The only thing I can compare this to in my experience is golf. For example, I have a routine that starts with stretching, then warm-up focusing on tempo, followed by wedges, progressing through longer irons, and lastly the driver. I will often finish by playing a few imaginary holes where I hit driver, then an iron to specific target on the range . Would something similar be beneficial in an archery practice session - maybe shoot at 10 yards, then 15, and finally 20 yards? Maybe finish with some type of competition?

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
 

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Do you have a garage or decent length hall?

What style of archery are you pursuing? What are your goals?

-Grant
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Do you have a garage or decent length hall?

What style of archery are you pursuing? What are your goals?

-Grant
I am currently shooting a 45 year old Wing Archery Nighthawk 60"/30#. After some more lessons and practice, I will upgrade to something like the SF Forged Plus (either 23 or 25" riser) and the Axiom Plus limbs or TradTech Black Max limbs. Probably add a decent sight to the new gear.

I have never hunted with a bow and don't see me getting into that. I don't know much about various styles (classes) of archery, but I am pretty much interested in either traditional recurve and the modern recurve with a sight. Not that interested in compound bows at this time. Any competition stuff is way down the road if at all. I am in it for the personal challenge and recreation.

BTW, I have a wife - so the question of whether I have a garage or decent length hall is moot. LOL
 

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Shoot a little bit at a time and don't worry about accuracy at first. Have fun with it.
Increase the amount of arrows shot as you are able to handle the weight and increase distance as accuracy improves.
 

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I have never hunted with a bow and don't see me getting into that. I don't know much about various styles (classes) of archery, but I am pretty much interested in either traditional recurve and the modern recurve with a sight. Not that interested in compound bows at this time. Any competition stuff is way down the road if at all. I am in it for the personal challenge and recreation.
IMO...the best way to learn how to shoot is to work on form first by shooting at a blank bale. Taking away the need to aim allows your body and mind to focus on developing your form.

It's hard for most people to work just on form because it requires allot of discipline and patience when the desire is to shoot at a target.

Research and Google FITA style form and work on developing that style.

BTW, I have a wife - so the question of whether I have a garage or decent length hall is moot. LOL
LOL :wink:

Ray :shade;
 

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Oddly enough shooting with or without a sight is kind of where the two paths diverge. Not saying you can't do both well, but they do have different techniques.
Getting in quality time at home without shooting is tough but possible.
If the instructor you are seeing introduces the concept of a shot sequence (they should) then make sure you write it down. Visualize each step in the sequence whenever you have a few moments until it comes easily to mind. You can also perform every step using a thera band to help cement the movements.
There is also a device called a form-master which allows you to shoot your bow without the arrow going more than a couple of feet.

Ultimately the solution is to just get your wife shooting.

-Grant
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Oddly enough shooting with or without a sight is kind of where the two paths diverge. Not saying you can't do both well, but they do have different techniques.

-Grant
I wasn't aware the techniques were different. I was just thinking that since I have been wearing glasses (myopic), that a sight would be beneficial. I have found that my distance only vision glasses are much better than my progressive lenses.

What are the major differences in technique?
 

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It would really help if you could put a target in a basement or garage and shoot some every day or every other day. Just do blank bale and blind bale work concentrating on form and release. Then go to the club and put that to work on the longer targets. My basement target is only 9 yards and I have to sit on a chair but it helps, especially in the winter months. But don't try to shoot little groups or this will happen.
IMG_2246.JPG
 

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I started archery about a year ago, having never touched a bow before. I have a back yard large enough to shoot in safely but otherwise we are similar. And archery is similar to a lot of sports.

It is never desirable to practice every day. Twice a week is pretty good. I have found that during any one session I start out pretty poor, then get better to maybe good, then start gradually spraying the arrows around the target. That is when I know it is time to quit. I own a dozen arrows and when I have decided to quit, I go close and shoot the dozen just as a strength training exercise.

I don't like the blank bale thing. If I don't have a target, I find myself shooting at a straw or dark spot on the backstop. So I always put a target up. Initially, the distance you shoot at is not very important. I started at 10 yards, and still missed the bale. I started with a 37# bow and at 5 yards it would put an arrow completely through a straw bale.

I shoot without sights. And the only real differences in form that I can think of are that if you are going to use a sight, you need to hold the bow where you can see the sight. I tend to hold mine a little offset to the right so I cannot see it. And when using a sight you probably need to hold the bow at full draw for a few seconds while you line up the sight and target. With no sights, I can eliminate much of the hold since I am either pointing at the target or not but can do nothing to correct it.

When you start breaking arrows, it is time to move back. If I shoot my dozen arrows at 10 yards now I will break something. But I find it more interesting to change distances anyway. I sometimes go to 15 or 20 yards just to mix it up. You are practicing form anyway and the form stays the same no matter the distance, but your errors are magnified with the distance.

Good luck
 

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I wasn't aware the techniques were different. I was just thinking that since I have been wearing glasses (myopic), that a sight would be beneficial. I have found that my distance only vision glasses are much better than my progressive lenses.

What are the major differences in technique?
Finger position on the string and anchor position on the face are two major differences. There is some other subtle stuff. If you want to shoot barebow then I recommend approaching your shooting with that as the end goal.
A sight doesn't do anything with regards to vision correction unless you are shooting a compound bow with a magnified optic.

Single vision glasses good but better still would be a set of contacts, head position with glasses becomes quite a bit more critical.

-Grant
 
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