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I have been told German Steel is the best numerous times by certain people. Since I am the type to try to figure things out for myself I thought I'd do a small search to see what I came up with. I found a decent article I thought I'd share...you can also search german steel for yourself and find the same things i did. I think the bolded section of the article has some main points. After all the stuff I have read on the internet it appears anyone can make German Steel. It's mainly formula used in the steel making. Same materials you can find in alot of different countrys. yes the article is posted for cutlery but that is where "German Steel" cam about. I just thought this was informative. And I believe all consumers (bowhunters, chefs, etc.) should know everything about what they are purchasing. So if anyone has anymore info on steel i would like to hear it.

The Truth About German Steel Blades

In today’s kitchen knife market the customer can be confused by the large number of knife brands that are for sale. Every company states that their brand is the best—it is sharper, holds an edge better, and is balanced for performance. Every manufacturer claims that they can turn an average cook into an excellent chef just by using their product. These are typical marketing strategies, but one strategy that the customer may not be aware of is the claim by some manufacturers that their knives are made from German stainless steel.

Some consider German steel to be superior to steel made in other countries, thus a higher quality material for knives. This is an argument best left to the metal geeks and metallurgists, but German steel is used by some of the larger knife manufacturers. This is where the problem arises. Since German steel is considered the standard for excellence and quality, manufacturers have found a marketing tool in labeling their product as being produced from German steel. Some advertise “German steel” or “German blade”, leading a customer to believe the blade was made of the finest materials, crafted in Germany. The term can be deceptive though. The term “German steel” or “German stainless steel” doesn’t necessarily mean it was produced in Germany, but rather is allowed to mean the steel was constructed using German formulas for steel composition. The steel may have actually been produced in another country other than Germany. If you feel that all steel is the same, and that German steel is no better than Brazilian steel, then you probably think that the steels are the same. This could be accurate, if weren’t for the manufacturers’ pursuit to get products made as cheap as possible.

A leading steel producing country, such as China, can offer these manufacturers low prices on steel that is supposed to be produced using the German standards. The problem arises when these Chinese firms skimp on some of the materials and produce inferior quality steel that is less structurally sound—meaning frequent blade breakage, or the blades lack the correct amount of chromium, vanadium, nickel or other elements that help make the blades more resistant to corrosion. As a customer, you would think that a manufacturer of knives or any other stainless kitchen utensil or cookware would test the steel to verify that it meets certain standards of composition. In the real world, a majority of knives on the market are not distributed by the actual manufacturer. Anyone with a little money can contact a Chinese kitchen utensil or knife maker and have them produce a product under a certain name; have them shipped to a warehouse in the US, and contract with a sales and marketing group that will introduce and advertise your product to the retail markets. If you have even more money you can have fancy TV commercials and print ads produced and give your product to a food magazine or TV show and pay for them to endorse the product. As the “manufacturer” you have no idea that the product you are selling is inferior and really don’t care to have an outside firm test your product. The Chinese company provides a document stating that the steel meets a certain standard and their word is not questioned. This practice is common with large kitchen equipment manufacturers looking to expand their product lines to generate higher revenues and capitalize on their good reputation of equipment manufacturers,
but the knives usually do not achieve the same high standards as their ovens, microwaves, mixers, etc. We won’t even discuss the discount store $5.00 chef knives private labeled cutlery produced for companies that are only concerned with having junk made for practically nothing, so they can mass distribute trash cutlery into the market.

For quality cutlery, such as kitchen and bbq knives look for brands that are actually manufactured by that company and only choose those lines that are produced in the manufacturer’s country. Be aware that some quality knife manufacturers have some of their cheap lines made in China.

For economical, quality brands check out brands such as Mundial—a Brazilian country that has roots in German knife manufacturing and have manufactured knives for brands such as Henckel. The low cost of labor and economical source of steel makes this a great choice for those searching for a commercial quality knife at a great price. Mundial is a leading brand in the US food service industry and used extensively by meat processing establishments around the orld. Be aware, that some of their cheaper cleavers and forks are made in China, though Mundial routinely tests the quality of the steel used in their products made in China.

Victorinox is another very popular and highly rated knife manufacturer, best known for their Fibrox handle stamped blade knives. Used extensively in the meat processing industry in the US, Victorinox knives are primarily Swiss made and use quality steels in the production of their products. Victorinox represents a mid-level price tier for cutlery—meaning you can get good knives, both stamped and forged, for a price that is reasonable.

Another, quality brand is the German knife company Friedr. Dick, or F. Dick. F. Dick is known world?wide for their quality products, especially their commercial line of butcher and chef knives and utensils. Unlike other brands, F. Dick manufacturers all of their products in Germany, enforcing strict quality control standards to produce some of the most durable and best looking knives on the market. Priced not much more than Victorinox, F. Dick is a major sponsor of cooking and butcher competitions in Europe and the US and have won numerous awards for their quality and design.

So in conclusion, don’t trust when a brand advertises their knives as being German steel. Buying your cutlery from an actual, long?standing knife manufacturer is assurance that you will be buying a tool that will withstand abuse and provide years of service. Purchasing your knives from an authorized dealer will also guarantee that you receive full protection by the manufacturer’s warranties—which sometime extend for the life of the knife.

By Daniel Clay, Mad Cow Cutlery, www.madcowcutlery.com


Read more: http://www.skinnymoose.com/dryrubbedrat/2010/03/28/some-thoughts-on-german-steel/#ixzz27rxuocJB
 

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I have been told German Steel is the best numerous times by certain people. Since I am the type to try to figure things out for myself I thought I'd do a small search to see what I came up with. I found a decent article I thought I'd share...you can also search german steel for yourself and find the same things i did. I think the bolded section of the article has some main points. After all the stuff I have read on the internet it appears anyone can make German Steel. It's mainly formula used in the steel making. Same materials you can find in alot of different countrys. yes the article is posted for cutlery but that is where "German Steel" cam about. I just thought this was informative. And I believe all consumers (bowhunters, chefs, etc.) should know everything about what they are purchasing. So if anyone has anymore info on steel i would like to hear it.

The Truth About German Steel Blades

In today’s kitchen knife market the customer can be confused by the large number of knife brands that are for sale. Every company states that their brand is the best—it is sharper, holds an edge better, and is balanced for performance. Every manufacturer claims that they can turn an average cook into an excellent chef just by using their product. These are typical marketing strategies, but one strategy that the customer may not be aware of is the claim by some manufacturers that their knives are made from German stainless steel.

Some consider German steel to be superior to steel made in other countries, thus a higher quality material for knives. This is an argument best left to the metal geeks and metallurgists, but German steel is used by some of the larger knife manufacturers. This is where the problem arises. Since German steel is considered the standard for excellence and quality, manufacturers have found a marketing tool in labeling their product as being produced from German steel. Some advertise “German steel” or “German blade”, leading a customer to believe the blade was made of the finest materials, crafted in Germany. The term can be deceptive though. The term “German steel” or “German stainless steel” doesn’t necessarily mean it was produced in Germany, but rather is allowed to mean the steel was constructed using German formulas for steel composition. The steel may have actually been produced in another country other than Germany. If you feel that all steel is the same, and that German steel is no better than Brazilian steel, then you probably think that the steels are the same. This could be accurate, if weren’t for the manufacturers’ pursuit to get products made as cheap as possible.

A leading steel producing country, such as China, can offer these manufacturers low prices on steel that is supposed to be produced using the German standards. The problem arises when these Chinese firms skimp on some of the materials and produce inferior quality steel that is less structurally sound—meaning frequent blade breakage, or the blades lack the correct amount of chromium, vanadium, nickel or other elements that help make the blades more resistant to corrosion. As a customer, you would think that a manufacturer of knives or any other stainless kitchen utensil or cookware would test the steel to verify that it meets certain standards of composition. In the real world, a majority of knives on the market are not distributed by the actual manufacturer. Anyone with a little money can contact a Chinese kitchen utensil or knife maker and have them produce a product under a certain name; have them shipped to a warehouse in the US, and contract with a sales and marketing group that will introduce and advertise your product to the retail markets. If you have even more money you can have fancy TV commercials and print ads produced and give your product to a food magazine or TV show and pay for them to endorse the product. As the “manufacturer” you have no idea that the product you are selling is inferior and really don’t care to have an outside firm test your product. The Chinese company provides a document stating that the steel meets a certain standard and their word is not questioned. This practice is common with large kitchen equipment manufacturers looking to expand their product lines to generate higher revenues and capitalize on their good reputation of equipment manufacturers,
but the knives usually do not achieve the same high standards as their ovens, microwaves, mixers, etc. We won’t even discuss the discount store $5.00 chef knives private labeled cutlery produced for companies that are only concerned with having junk made for practically nothing, so they can mass distribute trash cutlery into the market.

For quality cutlery, such as kitchen and bbq knives look for brands that are actually manufactured by that company and only choose those lines that are produced in the manufacturer’s country. Be aware that some quality knife manufacturers have some of their cheap lines made in China.

For economical, quality brands check out brands such as Mundial—a Brazilian country that has roots in German knife manufacturing and have manufactured knives for brands such as Henckel. The low cost of labor and economical source of steel makes this a great choice for those searching for a commercial quality knife at a great price. Mundial is a leading brand in the US food service industry and used extensively by meat processing establishments around the orld. Be aware, that some of their cheaper cleavers and forks are made in China, though Mundial routinely tests the quality of the steel used in their products made in China.

Victorinox is another very popular and highly rated knife manufacturer, best known for their Fibrox handle stamped blade knives. Used extensively in the meat processing industry in the US, Victorinox knives are primarily Swiss made and use quality steels in the production of their products. Victorinox represents a mid-level price tier for cutlery—meaning you can get good knives, both stamped and forged, for a price that is reasonable.

Another, quality brand is the German knife company Friedr. Dick, or F. Dick. F. Dick is known world?wide for their quality products, especially their commercial line of butcher and chef knives and utensils. Unlike other brands, F. Dick manufacturers all of their products in Germany, enforcing strict quality control standards to produce some of the most durable and best looking knives on the market. Priced not much more than Victorinox, F. Dick is a major sponsor of cooking and butcher competitions in Europe and the US and have won numerous awards for their quality and design.

So in conclusion, don’t trust when a brand advertises their knives as being German steel. Buying your cutlery from an actual, long?standing knife manufacturer is assurance that you will be buying a tool that will withstand abuse and provide years of service. Purchasing your knives from an authorized dealer will also guarantee that you receive full protection by the manufacturer’s warranties—which sometime extend for the life of the knife.

By Daniel Clay, Mad Cow Cutlery, www.madcowcutlery.com


Read more: http://www.skinnymoose.com/dryrubbedrat/2010/03/28/some-thoughts-on-german-steel/#ixzz27rxuocJB
Good thing reputable high quality American companies have no problem disclosing fully quality and origin of the components used in their products.

For example:


Quality
All SLICK TRICK ferrules, washers, printing packages and packaging are made by custom craftsmen here in the good ole’ USA. Blade specifications did not allow us to have our blades manufactured here, so to provide our bowhunters with the very best SLICK TRICK has it’s blades custom made in Solingen, Germany.

SLICK TRICK matches the best design with the best quality. SLICK TRICKS are 100% steel. Ferrules are made of a Super Steel much, much stronger than any aluminum ferrule, stronger than stainless steel ferrules, and stronger than titanium ferrules. Bowhunters are killing dozens of deer with a single ferrule, and still going. TRICK ferrules are custom machined to be the straightest in the industry, straighter than MIM (molded) ferrules, with a TIR of .001. Tolerances weight of heads are extremely precise.

Solingen Germany is long famous for being the “Knife Capitol of the World.” The reason is the Solingen superior steel and sharpening process. Lutz is an old Solingen company from 1922, famous for making surgical blades. When somebody says TRICK blades are scalpel sharp, they aren’t kidding.

MERCEDES BLADES Slick Trick now has CUSTOM KNIFE GRADE blades from Lutz of Solingen, Germany called MERCEDES blades. Like a custom knife these blades are better than others being sharper and 25% stronger. Mercedes blades are the best broadhead blades Lutz had ever made, and they are made exclusively for SLICK TRICK.


Ferrules that won’t bend and lose penetration costing an animal. Blades RAZOR SHARP that make animals bleed as much as they can given the shot location. Best quality plus best design guarantees best performance at the biggest trophy you will ever draw on.

:thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yea I understand all that..i found all that online...but what I came across more is that its a formula anyone can use and get the same end product. If this isnt true then why are st's $25 a pack..and why does nobody else use german steel if its the "best".
 

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Tell you one thing, you ever get the rare chance to shoot a giant buck on a full moon, you'd better hope you are using an all steel ferrule with the finest steel blades made. Might even have to go to Austria for that. Any buck moving on a full moon be so jacked up on gravitational fluid it'd be like trying to get penetration on the Hulk himself.
 

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Yea I understand all that..i found all that online...but what I came across more is that its a formula anyone can use and get the same end product. If this isnt true then why are st's $25 a pack..and why does nobody else use german steel if its the "best".
How much more clear can "SLICK TRICK has it’s blades custom made in Solingen, Germany" be?

As far as providing a quality product at a reasonable price you may want to look into business, economics, marketing and accounting reasons. Instead trying to poke holes in their quality. Maybe they realize they have more return costumers if the focus on quality, as opposed to providing inferior products and gouging for profits. :noidea: JMHO.
 

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Slick Tricks are a Great Broadhead,As you could say they are a Hybrid German-American Broadhead that gets there Blades from Germany and the Rest from the U.S. Alot of Broadheads are Hybrids,In different ways,As for German Steel being better,It just is...........
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
How much more clear can "SLICK TRICK has it’s blades custom made in Solingen, Germany" be?

As far as providing a quality product at a reasonable price you may want to look into business, economics, marketing and accounting reasons. Instead trying to poke holes in their quality. Maybe they realize they have more return costumers if the focus on quality, as opposed to providing inferior products and gouging for profits. :noidea: JMHO.
I respect ur opinion but in my lifetime custom equals more money...i agree st doesnt advertise much but neither does silverflame and they are $100 pack

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Yea I understand all that..i found all that online...but what I came across more is that its a formula anyone can use and get the same end product. If this isnt true then why are st's $25 a pack..and why does nobody else use german steel if its the "best".
Wasnt G5 going to be using German steel on some of their heads ?

G5 Havoc™ Specs:
• German Lutz Blades
 

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I respect ur opinion but in my lifetime custom equals more money...i agree st doesnt advertise much but neither does silverflame and they are $100 pack

Sent from my DROIDX using Tapatalk 2
Again basic business concepts, 100% manufactured in Germany : More material, more machining, exchange rates, importation costs, profit margins for distributers...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
My point is most companies are making german steel with the same process and formula and not coming from germany...technically thats not german steel, its german steel process of manufacturing. I didnt bring up slick tricks. I was speaking in general. I just personally think its wayyyy overhyped..and the term " german steel" is being construed by manu's

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My point is most companies are making german steel with the same process and formula and not coming from germany...technically thats not german steel, its german steel process of manufacturing. I didnt bring up slick tricks. I was speaking in general. I just personally think its wayyyy overhyped..and the term " german steel" is being construed by manu's
...but what I came across more is that its a formula anyone can use and get the same end product. If this isnt true then why are st's $25 a pack..and why does nobody else use german steel if its the "best".
I know what your saying, and I agree that "German steel quality" can be of a very different quality steel than "quality steel made in Germany." I disagree that using the

same formula yields the same quality product. A blade made in a factory with a reputation for producing strong sharp surgical products, will be a better quality product

than a product using the same formula. Why? Because the company in Germany with the reputation will have higher standards, more sophisticated equipment, more

experience, and also rigorous testing to ensure strength and sharpness and overall quality, so they can put their name on it and maintain their reputation. In contrast,

asian metals and german formula steel produced in other countries are not tested and controlled for quality in the same way, because the manufacturer that contracts the

work specifically does not want the name and origin of the company that produced the material on their package, they just want to put "German steel" or "scary sharpening

process" on the package. These same companies also won't spend money on testing the foreign steel themselves either, since their motivation is obtaining the lowest

cost per unit price, to maximize their profit. It specifically says this in the article you posted. Instead they might spent the money that buys quality on TV commercials,

and celebrity endorsements. Because there is more than one way to skin a cat.


Finally, the reason quality steel made in Germany is considered a selling point is due to a reputation based on results of objective testing of quality and tolerances over

time it is the real deal. This is the same reason lesser quality products are passed off as "German steel" to prey on consumer association of German and quality.

This is the hype.

Hope this clears some things up for you.

-40
 

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i'll just agree that german steel is good, but their is also other good steel that can perform the same or better.
Agree completely. :thumbs_up
 

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i'll just agree that german steel is good, but their is also other good steel that can perform the same or better.
I agree 100%. I have broken blades on every head that have killed with including slicktrick.the leading blade on the grave digger impresses me as much as if not more than any slicktrick blade.They sale replacement blades for a reason .heck I have killed three deer and one yote with the same set of blades on a regular rage 2" befor I had to replace them, just sharpen them bettween kills.
 
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