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I am new to traditional, and am loveing my savana longbow. I was practiceing today, and wondered how far I should be proficient before actualy hunting for game on a regular basis. So what is the max range that most of you would shoot at an elk or deer? Also I dont need to hear the old "its not how far, but how close" stuff. I am asking for real information here from real people. I am not looking at shooting animals far away, or I would stick with my compound. I am looking for honest answers from honest poeple. I assume the comfort range is probably inside 20 yards for most traditional shooters, but I dont know. Thanks Bill
 

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I am new to traditional, and am loveing my savana longbow. I was practiceing today, and wondered how far I should be proficient before actualy hunting for game on a regular basis. So what is the max range that most of you would shoot at an elk or deer? Also I dont need to hear the old "its not how far, but how close" stuff. I am asking for real information here from real people. I am not looking at shooting animals far away, or I would stick with my compound. I am looking for honest answers from honest poeple. I assume the comfort range is probably inside 20 yards for most traditional shooters, but I dont know. Thanks Bill
If the circumstances were right and I felt confident in the shot I would take a 50yrds. shot at an elk.

90% of my shots on a McKenzie elk target are in the kill zone at that range.

My opinion is to use a 3D target of the animal you intend to hunt and if you can put 90% of your arrows into the kill zone at a particular distance...that's a realistic hunting distance.

Some people use 100% as their standard and I respect that.

Another test is to use the NFAA 300 round and use a score of 240 or more as the defining distance.

Ray :shade:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks blackwolf
Man if I wait till I can do 90 at fifty I will never be able to go hunting. I think I will do my best to be ably to do 90 at thirty, and then do my best to not shoot over twenty.
 

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Thanks blackwolf
Man if I wait till I can do 90 at fifty I will never be able to go hunting. I think I will do my best to be ably to do 90 at thirty, and then do my best to not shoot over twenty.
Keep in mind...that you can limit yourself to 10 -15yrds. and still hunt. You can learn alot in the woods hunting and limiting yourself to that distance than staying at home and not hunting because you didn't meet your expectations of 20 or 30yrds.

Food for thought.

Ray :shade:
 

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I'm in for less than 20 yards and nowadays the shot has to be right or I take a pass and hope for a picture.

Much Aloha :cool::beer:
 

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The longest shot I've ever taken with a recurve was 35 yards and I hit him more or less exactly where I was aiming.
Apart from that one,I doubt any other big game animal I've shot was over 25 yards.
My effective range is greater than I'm likely to get a realistic shot opertunity in most of the areas I hunt.
But, given the chance I will always try to close the gap as much as I can.
I tend to be more concerned with getting good penetration,seeing how the animal reacts,and knowing which direction it goes after the hit than I am with actualy hitting it.
I normaly hunt very heavy and dense native bush that animals only need to take a step or two in an their out of sight,so those things are very important to me.
 

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The distance at which you can shoot a 240 on an NfAA target round is a good standard. That puts most of us at 15-25 yards anyway. With my current set up I can only pull that off at 10-15.

Oh, and do keep in mind that Ray is a freak of nature with a bow and should never be used as a reference for us mortals;)
 

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I just had a huge eye opener on this subject at my first 3D shoot shooting traditional last weekend.......the course was set loooong with lots of shots in the 30-40 yard range with some stretching to 50. Coupled with a 25mph constant wind and gusts to 40. That was an experience. One shot at an elk was close to a 50 yarder.....I held point on over his horns and still shot at his feet. My typical point on in 30 yards with an 18" hold over for 40, that shot into the wind was 6 feet low! I ended up with 3rd place less than 20 points behind first so not too bad and definitely an experience! For me shooting at a live critters will be reserved to 30 yards or less.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks guys, I will probably be good to go by season, but will try to keep everything inside of fifteen yards. I want to feel good out to thirty just in case, but we will see.
 

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My eyes are not that good any more.Under the right conditions 30yds or a bit farther is no problem.I don't usually need to shoot that far however because of the thick places I normally hunt.I am talking deer not elk.Never elk hunted so don't know anything about them other than they are bigger than a deer so I would probably want a closer shot with my lighter bow weights.;)
 

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Thanks guys, I will probably be good to go by season, but will try to keep everything inside of fifteen yards. I want to feel good out to thirty just in case, but we will see.
Don't worry about trying to be good out to longer ranges. Being capable at close range just means you have to practice closer range hunting tactics. Beleive me, I tried really hard to work to a goal of being able to hit out to 30-40 yards, and wound up missing several well under 20. Wound up back firing, since most of the opportunities I had gotten were close but I had worked hard enough towards making closer (20 and under) range shots natural and confident enough.
 

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20 yards and lower for live game. Anything higher than that is just for fun on the range. As a beginner, 20 yards shouldn't be any problem for you to get comfortable within. Anything higher than that though, and there start to be variables you can't account for which could cause you to wound an animal without killing it. My advice is that if you're going to hunt traditional this fall, don't take any shots over 20-25 yards, max.
 

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Oh, and do keep in mind that Ray is a freak of nature with a bow and should never be used as a reference for us mortals;)
LOL...kegan...I wish :teeth:

To be honest...I just believe God gave me a passion for this sport and that alone is what has done the most to help me become the archer I am today. I may have a little better than average hand and eye coordination but it isn't super human by any means ;) I use to be so obsessed with shooting there were nights I couldn't sleep for some reason or another and I would crawl out my bedroom window in my skibbies and shoot my bow in the dark.

As passionate as you are with archery...I wouldn't be surprised to find out how well you are shooting someday. Based on from I've read about you...you're shooting pretty darn good yourself.

It primarily takes desire, dedication, research and perseverence to fulfill our goals. If there's a will...there usually is a way :thumbs_up

Ray :shade:
 

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I don't know what my comfort distance is until the moment is at hand.

Too many variables regarding the setup (bow/arrows) I am using at the time, weather and terrain conditions, and shot circumstances that exist at the moment to be able to say that I have a consistent max comfort distance I will take the shot.
 

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Everyone is right, you need to be confident in your ability to make a shot. But don't forget to pratice like you hunt. For example I used to shoot arrows from a tree stand in my back yard. If fact for many years the only arrows I sent to a target were from a tree. Shooting left, center and right while shooting down at a steep angle is something you need to pratice if you intend to hunt from above.
 

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I use to be so obsessed with shooting there were nights I couldn't sleep for some reason or another and I would crawl out my bedroom window in my skibbies and shoot my bow in the dark.

Ray :shade:
so thats why i cant sleep at night, i need to do some night shooting;). man i would sneak out to but i dont think my parents or neighbors would be to happy with me if i did that:D. sure sounds fun though. on the main subject. ive been shooting for about 4-5 months now and im just now getting comfortable with 20 yards. i have a quick question though. is it somewhat normal to be able so shoot at 20 yards better than 10 yards? i found that out with the savannah. -Nick
 

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Practice long and shoot short

If you can get close to a comfort range at 40 yards, shooting at 20 gets a lot easier. The specific yardage doesn't matter. I find it's good to practice past my longest field shot. Big confidence builder, as long as the practice shots are GOOD ones.
 

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I've killed nearly 100 deer with my compound bow. Only one of those deer were shot over 20 yards, and only 5 were shot over 15 yards. I made the switch to traditional this past winter based on those numbers. I don't shoot competitively anymore and see no reason to need to shoot any further than that.

What have I found after 4 straight months of shooting nothing but my recurve? Only that I've been hunting the hardway! Seriously!

Wait for an opening to draw and estimate the yardage...draw the bow back, find my anchor, find my peep, center my sight aperature inside the peep, align everything, settle in and began my push pull, squeeze through the shot.

Now...it's wait for an opening...as the draw, anchor, and shoot is all one step. I had so much fun last weekend at my inlaws shooting off their balcony into the yard at random dandelions. From 5-20 yards, I wasn't range estimating this things, I was just looking at them, focusing on it, draw/anchor/shoot....hit. That practice right there really opened my eyes to the advantage I feel I earned shooting with my recurve.
 

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What have I found after 4 straight months of shooting nothing but my recurve? Only that I've been hunting the hardway! Seriously!
Gotta agree under those conditions, which is why alot of bowhunters who use compounds don't use peeps.

Sometimes the more simplistic your equipment is the easier it is to use.

Ray :shade:
 
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