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For all archers, would you share some light about what your training program throughout the seasons? Besides shooting on the range for loads of arrows per session, what else do you do to score more points?

I have read some of the Olympic rifle and pistol shooters' training plan; and they looked serious as a job performance and evaluation plan. I am very interested in learning about train smartly and effectively.

Thank you in advance.
 

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a saturday for me when im not at school si usually all training.
Wake up time 7:30
breakfast
warm up and stretch
go to JOAD and shoot about a hundred arrows.
lunch on the way home
when i get home i warm up and stretch again
then shoot about 50 blankbale arrows.
then shoot around 200 arrows at 60 and 70m.
theni do visulization
dinner
spts
mirror work

thats just my training schedule on a satudray.
Chris
 

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Wow, that's a lot of training Chris. It shows your dediction. Well done.

Just wondering what your workouts are like on School Days.

My son usually does morning workouts before school for an hour. I give him credit for getting up every morning during the week at 5:30am. Besides that, he also does two shooting sessions per week at either an indoor or outdor range.

Bob
 

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on school days i usually get home around 3:45 and go out and start shooting 60 or 70 meteres. i can usually get abou 2 hours in untill it gets dark, then come in and eat. after dinner i shoot blank bale for obout an hour and do spts, visulization and mirror work. im starting online school in a few weeks so il let yall know what the schedule is like for that.
chris
 

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Pardin my ignorence, but what is "mirror training"? I presume it means looking at your form in a mirror, but how exactly is it done and what to you look for?
 

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its done with a light bow, stretch band, and a form strap watching yourself in your mirror. you just watch to make sure you have the form down and it looks the same every time. its also a good way to devolp muscle memory when you see what you feel.
 

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Genesis 21:20
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would you share some light about what your training program throughout the seasons?
Shoot some arrows, drink a few :darkbeer:

And repeat ;)

Training requirements are very unique to the individual. Without knowing you, it is impossible to say what you need to be spending your time on...

One thing is certain however, the more serious you take your training, the better you will perform. That's universally true.

John.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Shoot some arrows, drink a few :darkbeer:

And repeat ;)

Training requirements are very unique to the individual. Without knowing you, it is impossible to say what you need to be spending your time on...

One thing is certain however, the more serious you take your training, the better you will perform. That's universally true.

John.
Well said. Indeed, training smart is essential. How did you train when you were competing to earn a spot in Olympic team and how did you train after you were in the team?

Physical, life style, mental training were all in the program, I assumed? Were some of these over rated?

Please advice.
 

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Genesis 21:20
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I shot a lot, but I didn't do a lot else. Didn't have time to. Not what most folks would describe as a "training" program. But then, most Olympic athletes don't have three kids and a full time career either...

I shot for maybe an hour in the morning before work, usually 2-3 times/week. Then again for another hour or two after work and in between shuttling kids to school and sports. And again on the weekends. Usually for 1/2 day or so on Saturdays. I tried to get in 1,000 arrows/week, but rarely did. Usually more like 500-700.

Archery is different than a lot of other sports. You can achieve world class performance without intensive physical training. It may help, but it's not essential. Go back and look at the better shooters. Few of them are capable of benching their body weight or even running a 6 minute mile.

Archery is about technique, consistency, a strong mental game and a good understanding of equipment. Probably in that order. Fitness is important only as it relates to technique and perhaps your mental game. Hard to be mentally strong when you're physically exhausted... So if you're going to train physically, I would start with a good cardio program. At the time, I was running about 10 miles/week and could usually run 3 miles in 24-27 minutes. That helped me with the long days and strong legs help give you a good foundation to shoot from.

But attention to technique is important too. All that physical training without good technique will only lead you so far. And to reach the truly elite levels, you need a qualified coach to really fine tune your technique. Most coaches can only get you so far too. I discovered that there are a precious few truly elite recurve coaches in the U.S. But there are many that can get you pretty far in this sport. So find one and listen to them.

I'll finish by saying that as one's technique is developing, they need to shoot a lot. But once their form has really settled in and they have experienced the level of success they are after, they can usually get by with shooting fewer arrows to simply maintain their technique. In other words, a lot of work early will pay off with years of quality shooting down the road...

John.
 
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