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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently with family commitments, I haven't been able to shoot as much as I would like, honestly not much at all. I told the wife that if I don't spend time shooting, I might as well not go out. On the last day of archery season, I miss judged the distance to a real nice 10 point and shot just under his belly. Upon reflection of the shot, I had realized that I had made a couple mistakes that I need to rectify before heading out to hunt next year. I just feel it is my ethical duty to shoot as well as I can to make a quick, clean kill. My grandson is 5 now, loves to do all things hunting with me, so I am buying him a bow for Easter. I know that his eagerness will get me shooting and plan to take him to several 3-D archery shoots to help with judging distances. I'm looking for some mental checklists you all use to establish a routine for shooting and judging distances accurately. I would greatly appreciate it. I have one that I have used in the past, but I know that many of you on here shoot year round and have very well developed routines that I hope you're willing to share. This information could come in real handy for those beginners here on the forums as well. Thanks for all of your help.
 

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(aka lug nut)
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10 Paces Exercise....

10 paces exercise
Hello all:

Some may already know this, so.....

This is for the folks who may not know this....

10 PACES EXERCISE

ESTIMATED DISTANCE TRAINING EXERCISE



Start with level ground.

Pick something close.

Using a rope with markers every 5 yards is a good exercise. Just take a walk in the park,
where you have lots of bushes, landscaping, benches, etc. Drag the rope behind you.

Stop,
and then look at the rope,
and burn the 5 yard marker and 10 yard marker into your brain.

Become an expert at 5 yards and 10 yards.

Over time,
next time you take a walk, without the rope,
you can IMAGINE the rope and the 5 yard marker position
and the 10 yard marker position.

Now,
double the distance for the 10 yard marker position,
and find an object that matches that estimated distance.


Now,
use your pacing stride to walk to that object.

A pacing stride is what surveyors use, to quickly estimate distance.

You take deliberate strides, and walk say 20 paces.
Whip out a long tape measure
and measure off the distance for your 20 paces.

Now,
do it again,
and walk 20 paces. Measure the distance.

Do this 3 or 4 times,
and measure the distance for YOUR 20 paces.

Pretty soon, you will know EXACTLY the distance 20 paces equals,
when YOU walk 20 paces.

So,
let's say 20 paces for YOU = 45 feet = 15 yards.

Soooo,
look for an object that is exactly HALF that amount.

Say you find a flower that YOU estimate is 7.5 yards.
So, walk off 10 paces and see if that is where you end up.

Now, whip out your tape measure, (100 foot tape measures are not that expensive)
and measure it off, or bring along your 50 foot rope.

Become an expert at estimating 10 paces...10 of YOUR paces.
Practice walking 10 paces back and forth,
between two markers
and make sure you always LAND on the 10th pace at the final marker.

If you become an expert at 10 paces (our example is 15 yards),
then,
you can also become an expert at DOUBLING IT....estimating 20 paces.

Have a yardstick with you.
Have a 24-inch metal ruler with you.

MEMORIZE the size of a yardstick.
MEMORIZE the size of a 24-inch metal ruler.

SET down the yardstick.
SET down the 24-inch ruler next to the yard stick.

Now,
WALK 10 paces away.

LOOK BACK,
and you will see the BEGINNING of the ruler and yardstick,
which is 10 paces.

LOOK BACK,
and you will see the END of the yardstick,
and that is 10 paces PLUS 1 YARD.

LOOK BACK,
and you will see the END of the ruler,
and that is 10 paces PLUS 2 FEET.



DOWNHILL is a special case,
cuz you have to estimate the HORIZONTAL DISTANCE,
cuz you SHOOT the horizontal distance.


Sooo,
let's say we have a 3D critter on a downhill slope from where you are standing.

Let's say that we have a STEEP downhill slope.

Well,
the distance along the ground,
from your shooting stake
to the 3D critter, which happens to be leaning against a tall tree,
is EXACTLY 10 of YOUR paces.

So, for our example,
10 of YOUR PACES = 15 yards,
along the ground of this STEEP DOWNHILL slope.

BUT,
we shoot the horizontal distance,
between the shooting stake
and
the TALL TREE....not, the ground distance along the downhill slope.

So,
when you look at the TALL TREE,
and your shooting stake,
and we look with a LEVEL head (not tilted downhill, but level)...

say we estimate the distance,
from the shooting stake
to the TALL TREE looking level,
is 10 PACES, but a little shorter,
say 2 paces SHORTER.

So,
we think that the horizontal distance is 8 PACES.

Well,
10 of YOUR paces, in this example, is 45 feet or 15 yards.

So,
1 pace = 10% = 1.5 yards.
So,
8 paces = 10 paces minus 2 paces = 15 yards minus 3 yards = 12 yards.

This is why we need to know what distance is 10 of YOUR PACES.

If we know what distance is 10 of YOUR PACES,
then, we can EASILY figure out what ONE of your paces is, distance - wise.
 

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(aka lug nut)
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49,698 Posts
Practice at SHORT YARDAGE exercise....

Practice at short yardage,
and become a master of estimating 5 yards.

Carry the yardstick
and carry the 24-inch ruler or carpenter's level.

Become a master subtraction expert
and a master addition expert.

You can actually get really really accurate, at the short stuff.

I spent 25 years doing civil engineering,
and worked on some very large projects (power plant demoltion)
and large scale exavation (hazardous waste).

Learn how to visualize on the ground,
an imaginary yard stick (3 feet).

Learn how to visualize on the ground,
a 24-inch carpenter's level.

If you can master visualizing 5 yards,
then,
you can master doubling it.

Then,
you can also master whacking off a carpenter's level from the 10 yard estimated mark.

Then,
you can also master ADDING a yardstick to the estimated 10 yard estimated mark.


Use a 50 foot reference rope, marked off at 5 yard reference points,
(use rags)
and see how the subtle curves of the ground,
affect your estimating.

Practicing with a range finder actually HURTS you.

Bring along the yardstick and the 24-inch carpenter's level,
with the 50 foot rope,
and you will become an expert in no time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Nut&Bolts for all of the info. One of the things I realized I did wrong was dropped my chin toward my chest, therefore shot low. I think my range would have been adequate had I kept my form perfect though it may have hit a little low, but my aim point was to double lung him (just slightly above the horizontal line from the furthest part of the should blade of shoulder). I'm certain that had I kept my head up my shot would have still double lunged him at the bottom of the lungs. I'll be shooting in my basement all winter so I should have a 10 yard increment pretty well solidified by the time the weather breaks. I've also already started to practice ranging things and I'm driving my wife nuts with it. Every time we go somewhere, I stop, estimate a distance to a spot or thing, then walk it. You should see the faces of people at a Chinese buffet when I was walking all over the place doing it. Needless to say, my wife got a little embarrassed about the 4th time I got up from the table, lol.
 

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(aka lug nut)
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49,698 Posts
Thanks Nut&Bolts for all of the info. One of the things I realized I did wrong was dropped my chin toward my chest, therefore shot low. I think my range would have been adequate had I kept my form perfect though it may have hit a little low, but my aim point was to double lung him (just slightly above the horizontal line from the furthest part of the should blade of shoulder). I'm certain that had I kept my head up my shot would have still double lunged him at the bottom of the lungs. I'll be shooting in my basement all winter so I should have a 10 yard increment pretty well solidified by the time the weather breaks. I've also already started to practice ranging things and I'm driving my wife nuts with it. Every time we go somewhere, I stop, estimate a distance to a spot or thing, then walk it. You should see the faces of people at a Chinese buffet when I was walking all over the place doing it. Needless to say, my wife got a little embarrassed about the 4th time I got up from the table, lol.
Absolutely correct.

Dropping the chin, you miss low.
Raise your chin, higher than normal, you miss high.

Lemme know if you want more help.
 
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