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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After reading some suggestions here about how to be more consistant and improve form I purchased a lighter weight bow a few weeks ago. An old Bear Bearcat 40# 60" recurve. I have been shooting it for 2 weeks now and it has really helped me. I started at eight yards and have now moved back to 12 yards. Baby steps :smile:
I can keep my groups (4 arrows) in a 5" circle at 12 yards most of the time. (That's good for me)
My question is, at what point do I go back to my hunting bow to practice and is it advisable to jump back and forth with the different weight bow weights when practicing
My hunting bow is a 50# 64" recurve.
 

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gumba -

Personal choice. If you think you're comfortable with your form on the "light" bow, then try in on the hunting bow and see what happens. Personally, I'd like to see you holding 6-8" at 20 yds first.

The purpose of the lighter bows we always recommend, is to let the new shooter learn what good form feels like. Two hours with a #10 bow will do most new shooters a lot more good that two years to a bow that's heavy enough to not let them feel what a good controled shot should feel like - and conversely what a bad shot feels like! That's the risk of a bow that's a little heavy.

Viper1 out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Viper1.
 

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Shooting a lighter bow will always help with good form.

I started on a 55# Recurve and it took me quiet some time to get it feeling right. It was my dads and he gave it to me after I had 20 some odd years of compound shooting.

I now shoot a 65# long bow but most of the bows I own are around 55#.
I went threw a short period this summer trying to decide which I wanted to hunt with and jumped from bow to bow, sometimes all 4 in one outing.
My accuracy suffered I feel because not every bow had the same feel or shelf design, length, etc.
All within 10# of each other but all different in ways that effected my accuracy.
My advice is find what comfortable and stick with just one until you get what your looking for in accuracy then just play with the others...
 

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Hello Gumba,

Gumba>>After reading some suggestions here about how to be more consistant and improve form I purchased a lighter weight bow a few weeks ago. An old Bear Bearcat 40# 60" recurve. I have been shooting it for 2 weeks now and it has really helped me. I started at eight yards and have now moved back to 12 yards.<<

Congradulations... This is why Viper and I (and a few others) try our best to get people to start out on a lighter bow. (And if you want, you can either keep that bow or sell it when you are done with it, but I bet you keep it!) ;)


We have seen way too many people attempt to start out on heavy bows... and fail... or become just so-so archers.


G>>My question is, at what point do I go back to my hunting bow to practice and is it advisable to jump back and forth with the different weight bow weights when practicing My hunting bow is a 50# 64" recurve.<<

That is up to you... go ahead and try your bigger bow. But usually (like viper said) it is good to be able to plug those arrows in at 20 yards in a 8 inch circle. That way , you know your form and release are working somewhat in the right direction!

If the bigger bow is not working, go back to the lighter bow. But one thing to remember (like Viper said) try to stick with one bow, because even bows with *same* poundage shoot different. (Different aiming, gapping, feel, handgrip, etc).

Two most important things... FORM and RELEASE.

To heavy of a bow can destroy these things quite rapidly.

I like Vipers words.... (and they are EVER so TRUE!!)
Repeated again for all to re-read:

Two hours with a #10 bow will do most new shooters a lot more good that two years to a bow that's heavy enough to not let them feel what a good controled shot should feel like - and conversely what a bad shot feels like! That's the risk of a bow that's a little heavy.

Dwayne
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
DwayneR & VTbowman thanks for the advice.
 

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instinctive shooting

The beautiful thing about instinctive shooting is that you can shoot one bow, then pick up another for the next shot and hit close to, or right with the last arrow!!!
I've got five recurves and one longbow, and when I go shoot, I take a different one every time, just cause I can, and I enjoy shooting all of em, plus, I can pick up my friends bows and shoot them too,.......as far as hunting is concerned, you prolly need to settle on one bow a couple of weeks before the season starts so you'll be used to the poundage....they're all similar, but they're not all "exactly" the same. Every bow has it's own little quirks, so get used to the one your gonna use on game day.
 
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