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In the process of putting together some components for a RX-1 Turbo. Really have never paid much attention to different stabilizers but I figured what the heck, new bow, might as well see if there is actually a rhyme or reason behind all these stabilizers. Anybody have any advice? I want cold hard facts, not fan boy stuff because if they all do the same thing, I could definitely save some money in this department
 

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8 inch bee stingers are a go to stabilizer
 

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I like shadow stabilizers. I like them because they are cheap and customizable as far as colors so I figured why not.
 

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I've had a bunch of them....some are junk, some are not.
I would also recommend BeeStinger but regardless of the brand, I would recommend getting one stabilizer that has adjustable weights out front and is at least 12 in. long for actual stabilization. I would also recommend a shorter one, around 8 in. just for hunting to keep mass weight down.....both of which have carbon bodies for the best in vibration control. If you're gonna buy just one, a 10 in. with adjustable weights might be the ideal compromise.
 

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Check out wicksticks. I really like there options.
 

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I run shadow stabs on my Nitrum Turbo 10/8. Think I have 6 on front and 8 on rear. I run a bee stinger mount that attaches to the front. Now fro target I run bee stingers with 30/12 combo.
If I were gonna run just 1 I would go with a 10” with whatever weight you feel comfortable with.


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I have a 10" bee stinger on all yr and then right b4 hunting season I switch to a nap (apache?) its under 8" this is so I don't have to screw around taking the stabilizer off to get it in the bowcase. yes I have a quick detatch but when I get to the woods I don't like anything to slow me down I just want to get in that treestand
 

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I run and gun elk so, 8" stab is as big as ill run. I have an 8in beestinger on one bow and just ordered an 8in Doinker for my other bow. Both good stabs and both give you the ability to add or subtract weight.
 

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In the process of putting together some components for a RX-1 Turbo. Really have never paid much attention to different stabilizers but I figured what the heck, new bow, might as well see if there is actually a rhyme or reason behind all these stabilizers. Anybody have any advice? I want cold hard facts, not fan boy stuff because if they all do the same thing, I could definitely save some money in this department
Here are the cold, hard facts. Target archers use long forward stabilizers with the weight as far away from the bow as possible. This is to increase moment of inertia which resists floating/torqueing the bow off target. The longer the better but with hunting you need it 8" or more to stabilize and 12" or less to not run into too many things. Field and stream magazine wrote an article about this.https://www.fieldandstream.com/blogs/whitetail-365/2013/07/does-short-stabilizer-really-add-stability
Since the ideal stabilizer has as much weight forward as possible, lightweight carbon bodies are the way to go in my mind - again look at what stabilizers are made of for target archery. If you're only worried about accuracy then you can stop reading here but I wanted maximum vibration reduction also. That doesn't seem to be a concern for target archers. The ideal stabilizer still has the weight as far forward as possible so you can't put the dampening material at the end. Putting dampening material between the bow and stabilizer would be bad also because then the "moment of inertia" is less effective. So that means the ideal stabilizer has dampening material between the carbon body and the end weight like shown in the picture below.
stabilizer.png
Doinker brand (specifically the EXO and Flex Hunter lines) have those qualities. The Flex hunter was the one I choose because I have a carbon bow that doesn't need too much weight but the EXO allows heavier weights and may be better suited to balance larger aluminum bows. That's a dollar plus my 2 cents.
 

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Dead Center carbon v2.
 

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I run a 10" Elite Archery Doinker stabilizer with about 5 oz out front and a 5" Shadow back bar with 8 oz as my hunting setup. I run 10" Shadow front stabilizer with about 6 oz and a 8" back bar with 12 oz for 3D. I really like the Shadow stabilizers.
 

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I have a 12 inch b stinger hunter pro that I really like for hunting. They have three weights that you can customize for your needs. I like this one alot. Alot of people say that a 12 inch is too long for hunting purposes, but I say shorter ones are too short for what a stabilizer is intended to do. Think about it, you have a 28 inch arrow hanging out the front of your bow anyway, the stabilizer sure won't hit anything the arrow doesn't.
If your going to carry the extra weight of a stabilizer on your bow, why not use one that will help your shooting a little ?
It doesn't need to weigh any more than a six inch, you just need the weight in the right place.
Either way you choose, a good stabilizer will help out for sure.
 

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I've run three different set ups over the years, and where each have their purpose - each have their draw backs.

First is the standard single stabilizer forward. I changed between 8, 10, or 12" over the course of an off season and settled on the 10" for actual hunting. When I do this I didn't use a lot of weight forward, maybe an 1.5oz if anything in the field (tested all the way out to 9oz during the off season). You can get decent stabilization effects out of this setup, I feel to do so and have a noticeable change in pin float is getting heavy overall. My setup for this did nothing for vibration.

The second setup I ran for the 2015 season was a mini-version of a complete target rig. 10" up forward with 1.5oz weight, and an 8" rear with 6oz. Really stable, really nice to shoot, but as a ground hunter that never lets the bow out of his hand it didn't last a second season in the field.

I currently took that riser mount rotated it around to gain clearance on the lower limb, and bolted that 8" stabilizer facing forward with no weight at all on it. This was a great option, a take-off of some things the RX-1 series does offseting the stabilizer in the first place. Allowed for a counter balance effect to the sight/rest weights on the right side of the bow and provided a good float pattern on the pin and bubble for me.
 

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8” min 12” max, Carbon, some weight out front with good dampeners is what I would go with.

I have 8” Dead Center Archery on my Prodigy and really like it. Had bStinger 8” sport hunter on Spyder but the vibration dampening seems better with the DCA. Both are good.
 

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Finally switched from running small limbsavers stabs for years to an 8in bstinger and I’ll never look back. I’d say for a simple hunting setup go with an 8-10in stabilizer with the adjustable weights.
 
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