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0321
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pretty good,
im a huge fan of MGRS over Lat/long coordinates.

if anyone has questions, i have 10 years navigation experience using MGRS. navigating is a huge tool when your a hunter. especially if you hunt rugged big terrain. after you learn the basics, i would say the next thing you need to do is learn to read topo lines.

this guys explains how to get from point A to point B but what if there is a huge cliff or some other obstacle on your route. almost never can you walk a straight line to where your going, if you can read topo lines you can plan your route.
 

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I was briefly into Orienting, navigating terrain with a compass and map.
I am still surprised how many I hunt with don't know north from south and which direction we are headed. My girlfriend uses On Star to go to the store!
 

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Former Wyoming Boy
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I need to brush up on this stuff again... Alaskan moose in 2017.
Easy to get rusty if you don't use it.
 

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Good stuff
Gritty Bowmen podcast has Arraon Snyder on to talk about navigating
He gets very in depth, give it a watch it helped me a lot
 

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Back down to ground level
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16,304 Posts
pretty good,
im a huge fan of MGRS over Lat/long coordinates.

if anyone has questions, i have 10 years navigation experience using MGRS. navigating is a huge tool when your a hunter. especially if you hunt rugged big terrain. after you learn the basics, i would say the next thing you need to do is learn to read topo lines.

this guys explains how to get from point A to point B but what if there is a huge cliff or some other obstacle on your route. almost never can you walk a straight line to where your going, if you can read topo lines you can plan your route.


Good point on not always being able to travel in a straight line. An easier route could be following the topo lines, or heading in another direction first to then follow a terrain feature. I usually don't try to hit an exact point, say where I'm parked, but will instead aim for a point on the road that is off to one side so I know which way to go if I hit the road and don't see the truck.

Instead of adding the magnetic declination after taking a reading with the north south lines, I draw magnetic north lines across my maps before using them. Follow the magnetic arrow on the map to repeatedly draw lines the width of the ruler. When taking the reading, line up the north-south lines in the compass dial with the lines you drew on the map, instead of with the edge of the map. The latitude lines don't always appear on a map within your compass to line it up with. It saves a step, also.

Learn how to orient a map to your position. This will help if you are lost, and don't have a starting point to go by. There should also be video on how to orient a map.
 

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Just Do It.....
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Discussion Starter #16
I usually don't try to hit an exact point, say where I'm parked, but will instead aim for a point on the road that is off to one side so I know which way to go if I hit the road and don't see the truck.

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Aiming off is a good idea.
 

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Tagged to watch later when I have time, thanks for the heads up Zap
 

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It took me a while to learn map and compass techniques. I was learning in the northern Adirondacks where there is a lot of all types of terrain and many thick swamps or dense spruce patches. One thing I learned the hard way is always have a good compass and map (or 2 compasses) and always trust your compass. I could never hit an exact spot, but I never tried to be that accurate. I rarely carry a compass anymore in the WV mountains as I have developed a keen sense of direction and all of our mountains run north and south with finger ridges running east and west so it's pretty easy.
 
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