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Discussion Starter #1
I am going on an backpack elk hunting trip this fall and am trying to decide on a pack. We will leave in August and be gone for about a week so I won't need any cold weather clothes. I will be in northwest Colorado at about 10,000 feet and plan to pack in a few miles, so I need to carry everything I need for a week. I am 15 years old, about 140 lbs and 5'11". There will most likely be 3 adults and 3 kids my age including me going along. It has to be able to pack out an elk and needs to be camouflage. I am looking at the Outdoorsman's Pack System and it seems like the perfect setup for me. Just wondering what you guys think and if you would recommend something else. I have heard the Outdoorsman's is a great pack. Any responses are appreciated.
Nathan
 

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Here's a thread the other day w/the same question w/some info on it. In terms of camo, the only high end packs I know of that make packs in camo are Kuiu and I believe you can get the Kifaru packs in one of the Kyptek camo patterns and I think a multi cam. Other than that you'll be looking at an off the shelf pack if you're wanting a Mossy Oak or Realtree pattern. I personally wouldn't put to much into camo on a pack unless it's just a personal thing you want.

http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showthread.php?t=1983746
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I just looked up the Kifaru and Kuiu packs and they seem very expensive. I don't want to spend a ton of money. Have you heard anything about the Outdoorsman's Packs? They are almost half the price it seems. I guess I am mainly asking for opinions on the Outdoorsman's Packs.
 

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When I was fifteen I used an old trapper Nelson frame with an army surplus duffel strapped to it. Nobody has money for a good pack at that age. The young are tough and heal quick, use whatever you can get. If you have the money I suggest getting a good pack such as eberlestock or badlands because they will last forever. Otherwise go cheap because you will end up upgrading it anyways.
 

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I do not have any recommendation on a pack but if I were going into a wilderness environment at 10,000' I would recommend bringing some warm clothes no matter what time of year it was. I was informed, when taking first aid training, that most hypothermia deaths occure when the temperature is in the 50's. Good luck on your hunt.
 

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The frame is curved away from the natural bend of your back, and I found the belt created hotspots.
In my mind a better and more inexpensive option would be a Kelty Cache Hauler with a pack of your choice fitted to it.

Of course for the $400 you are looking at spending on the Outdoorsman you could always get a used Kifaru Longhunter, and be a whole lot more comfortable.
 

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I was all about the hunting pack until I picked up mountaineering as a side hobby. You really need to evaluate your style of hunt and determine what you are doing. If you are hiking in and establishing base camp and then venturing off for day hunts as the herd moves then the whole notion of a hunting pack should be thrown out the window, and the idea of a base camp pack and a day pack should be considered. If you have to carry everything you bring with you for every step of the way you best be considering cutting the pack weight as much as possible. I own both hunting packs and mountaineering or backpacking packs and if I were to head out into the wilderness I would probably bring my Gregory Reality 70L hiking pack and strap the Kifaru Spike camp (30L) to it for day ventures. My hunting packs cost me a mint and looking back I regret paying as much as I did. My mountaineering packs were all bought used for <$50 and carry gear as well or better, just aren't camo. My next pack will probably be the Mountain Hardwear South Col 70L pack at <3lbs.

Also one of the posters above me said always have emergency gear for cold temps at that altitude. A good 800 fill down jacket packs down to the size of a baseball but may save your life and at the very least have an emergency poncho to keep your down from getting wet.
 

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I have been in Colorado the first week in September and woke up to 6" of snow. Read about Hypothermia, it is probably the thing you should fear the most.
 

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The Mountain Hardwear South Col 70L pack weighs in at 3lbs 4oz, is just under 4300cu in. and has a weight rating of around 50lbs. With its 100d nylon body I hope your not going to be hauling too many elk out with it. Although I suppose if you are only going once a year it very well could last a couple years.
I do agree on a couple of things though, most good designs are from a mountaineering background, and camo is overrated.
 

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Look at the Tenzing TZ5000 or 6000. I'm in Green Bay if you want to check them out or I'll be in Madison at the Deer and Turkey Expo Booth 1032
 

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Sometimes paying extra now will save you more $ later. This is just from my own experience to buy something once or end up paying more in the long run because I had to buy something multiple times. It just depends on how hard and how often your gonna use it. A good motto I've heard is buy the best you can afford.
1)Kifaru
2)Stone Glacier
3)Mystery Ranch
4)Eberlestock
These are the ones either myself and or my buddy's have. Yes, there are many others out there but I can not comment on them because I haven't used them. Aron Snyder is a good contact to talk to he's the one that does the field testing on many field rucks. As mentioned above try Rokslide.com you can contact Aron there or at Kifaru.com.
Good luck, have fun and stay warm up there!
 

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The Mountain Hardwear South Col 70L pack weighs in at 3lbs 4oz, is just under 4300cu in. and has a weight rating of around 50lbs. With its 100d nylon body I hope your not going to be hauling too many elk out with it. Although I suppose if you are only going once a year it very well could last a couple years.
I do agree on a couple of things though, most good designs are from a mountaineering background, and camo is overrated.
I agree completely, as someone who will only have the chance to chase elk once every five years or so I will trade the durability for the weight savings.
 

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At 10,000' in NW Colorado, don't assume you won't need warm clothes. I have hunted in that time and had it get down to 20 degrees at night.
 

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I'm assuming your going with someone who's got some experience? If not, I will add to those that have already mentioned weather. I've woke up to below freezing temps also the first week of September, in NW Colorado. Also don't assume all the Elk are miles off the road. We always take our horses and go in about 8 miles, but have spent time at the trail head the first couple days, and been into Elk less than a mile off the main road. Hunt your way in.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I do plan on bringing warm clothes, and I absolutely realize that hypothermia is an issue. I was just saying that I will not need to pack like it is a winter hunt with freezing temps guaranteed for the whole hunt. I will bring warm clothes no matter what, I just won't pack as if it was a November hunt.
How many cubic inches do you think I will need to carry everything I need for a week? We plan on making a base camp, then hunting from there, so I can leave most of my stuff at camp, then carry a smaller pack while I hunt. If I shot an elk then I would just go back to camp and get the frame pack, then go back to the elk and pack it out from there? I guess I wanted camo because I planned on carrying my frame pack while I hunted with not much in it, then not have to make an extra trip if I got an elk.
 

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How well does all of your gear compress? That will tell you how big of a pack you need, but 5000cu in is probably a good idea give or take a couple cu in.
Personally, I prefer a one pack system as it saves a lot of time and steps. You can always compress a good pack down for use during the day, then expand it out for elk hauling duties.
Camo is not needed for a pack, currently mine are a foliage color, but there are some patterns out there that look pretty cool.
 
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