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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I continued to add trees to my property last year I added 10 Dogwoods, 6 Butternut, 4 Wild Pears, and 25 Norway Spruces. This year I am looking at 6 Hazelnut, 6 American Chestnut and some additional Conifers. They will be planted in Newaygo County Michigan. Which is a colder area of Michigan at least so far this year it is... Any other trees I should be looking at?

The Conifers are to be a screen staggering them about 15 to 20 feet apart.

Soil is a sandy type and some things takes a lot of TLC to get to grow...

LFM
 

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I've planted 1000+ Norways over the years. Last year we added White Spruce to fill in the dead spaces and for additional screening. I've lost none, thus far, very impressed. Growth rate is great too. I like White Pine but as they mature they get more open, not a fan for that reason. I also planted Red Cedar, adding more of them this year.
I plant my conifers at 10' spacing. I want them dense for thermal cover.
My soil is very good, not sure about sandy soil, sorry.
 

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hunter
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From personal experience I will tell you to cross Austrians off of your list. I have a lot, at least the ones that are left! Maybe five hundred. They are slow growing and susceptible to pests and disease. Arborvitae are fair, but also slow to get going, but the deer will eat on them in hard winter conditions. I find Bald Cypress to be a neat/unique tree, and they do well if you have some low areas that lay a bit wet. Maybe some crabapple? Sounds as if you have a good start already.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
20 years ago I started with some Apple Trees several different ones. I got about 12 producing fruit almost yearly accept for 2012 we had a late frost and it hurt most all with Apple Trees in the state. This year we had a lot of fruit and even had bear climbing one tree (got video) trying to get the apples out of reach broke off a branch that it could get 3 apples off of. Never had apples on in Dec still even deer trying to get to them... I have planted Serberian & Zumi Crab Apples 4 & 5years back they are about 6 or so ft tall already. The wild pears are almond leaf, winter and eos I added the almond 3 years back and 2 years back I added the winter & eos... I also added 5 wild apple trees this year. I thought about Speckle Alders but they might be tough to get going in my sand soil... I have some Hazelnuts and Chestnuts on order from Chief River... Hope I can get them going next Spring. Thought I would see what others might suggest...

Thanks,
LFM
 

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I want to keep an eye on this. Going to try planting some screen trees along the road frontage on my 10 acres. Been looking at most of the trees you mentioned. Anyone know who they grow in an exsisting timber on a road edge? I'm sure the growth rat ewill be slower, but I'd love to have some 5-6' to hide from the road. I was thinking eastern red cedars, but will be doing more research
 

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Deer generally don't eat white spruce and they'll grow fairly quickly - even in my crappy clay soil.
As an aside, I planted some European Larch a couple years ago and they are almost growing like weeds. The downside, of course, is that they shed their needles in the late fall and you would lose your screen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That is why some say White Spruce are the best being the Deer won't eat them and grow faster than others. Red Pine seem to do okay and have yet to have the deer eat them, they rarely hit any of the conifers on my property being they all have full branches near ground level... In the spring... Thanks for the info... not missing any needles or anything like I have see in some wildlife articles.

LFM
 

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hunter
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Red Cedar seem to grow wild along highways and roadside ditches here in Central Ohio. I have "appropriated" some small ones with a quick shovel and a five gallon bucket. They seem to be hardy and easy to transplant. Highway mowing just chops them off, so I don't feel as if I am stealing anything. They have small berries/seeds that the birds eat and poop - thus they are fast spreading.
 
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