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Which draw weight?

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So I am a complete beginner and need some help deciding on a draw weight.

I check out a local shop and the guy measured me and said my length was between 29.5" and 30." He gave me some bows to try and I felt like 65-67 pounds wasn't too much trouble for me and I could repeatedly draw that. Should I get 60 or 70 pound limbs? I would think 70 and could adjust down a few lbs if needed? What about a bow that has 80 pound limbs? Would adjusting those down to 70 be ok? If I can draw it now, it should get easier with practice, right?

Finally, is there any negatives to having a higher draw weight besides the difficulty?

Thanks!
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Here's my opinion. First, I don't know how big a guy you are, but it sounds like you could handle the 70# limbs just fine if you are drawing 65-67 lbs with ease. But......given that you have a long draw length, you should not have much problem getting good speed at lower draw weights. My draw length is about the same as yours and I can handle 65# just fine, but I shoot around 57# year round (tournaments and hunting). Max speed for the tournaments I shoot is 280fps +or- 3% and I achieve that with the arrows I shoot at 57# so I don't need any more draw weight. For hunting (whitetails) I like the same weight. I can draw my bow slow and smooth from any position and I feel like it is all the weight I need. Also, I think I am more accurate at 57# than I am at 65#. Some will argue that more lbs will be a big plus if you make a marginal shot (shoulder). I would argue (for me) more lbs increases the likelyhood of making a marginal shot. Also, I prefer to shoot a 60# limb cranked down to or near max over a 70# limb backed out. Seems a little quieter and more efficient. FWIW, I have two 60# bows and one 70#. All are set on 57#.

How much below the limb max you can go down to depends on the bow and how you have it set up. Most times I would say 10-12 lbs less.
 

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If 65-67# felt fine then I would probably get a 60-70# bow.
Do you need to pull 70# for deer? No.
I wouldn't get 80# limbs, everyones different. Bows are much more difficult to draw sitting in a blind, or wearing a bunch of clothes with cold muscles.
 

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Right, I wouldn't get an 80# bow, either.

I'd suggest trying a 60-70#, turned down to the 62-ish range as you begin; as strength and ability improve, you can gradually increase towards 70#.

One thing that sometimes gets forgotten is this: from time to time, you have to "let down" from full draw, and believe me, that takes a lot more muscle and control than it takes to draw back.

If I was a beginner, I'd pick up a used bow and learn with it, and get a "top of the line" bow later on. Used bows tend to hold the same value, i.e. if it's $400 today, it will probably be worth at least $350 if not $400 to someone else six months or a year from now. By contrast, a brand new bow at $750 quickly becomes a $600 used bow.
 

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training

in my opinion you shouldn't mix learning to shoot and conditioning your muscles at the same time. start shooting and learning form at a weight(probably even less than you think) you are comfortable with NOW. don't learn your form at a weight that you expect "to get used to". you will learn bad BAD habits. even if it means starting with a cheaper bow and then getting a different one. or starting with lighter limbs and then switching them. JMHO
 

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I'm just in my second year of shooting, but I have read articles that say that most people seemingly get too heavy a draw wt unncecesarily...that 50-60 libs is all you need for almost all hunting...and that heavier DW doesnt translate into more arrow speed, as, with more DW you need a heavier arrow, which goes slower...also less DW means better accuracy...also they say that a bow shoots better cranked up to its max....a 50-60 cranked up to 55-60 shoots better than a 60-70 cranked down to 70....I am no expert, but this is what I have gleaned....
 

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Most bow brands will only have 10# of adjustment on their "adult" models (Hoyt, Prime, and Elite for sure). There are others out there with more adjustment... Mathews with the switchweight mods gives you more room (I'm not that familiar with them though), most PSEs have closer to 20# of adjustment, most upper end Bears will do 15# of adjustment, and so on and so forth.

I've shot everything from about 85# to 40#, and it all depends on application. It's an accuracy competition, not a muscle one. But if hunting you want enough umph to put the game down ethically that you plan on taking. For most North American whitetail deer, I would say 45# minimum, and lean more towards 50#+. I've had passthroughs on whitetail with 55# and a relatively light arrow (380gr), so don't overthink it either. For wild hogs, bear, elk, etc. I would opt for a little more power.

For target shooting, especially if you're just playing the indoor spot game, then the weight don't really matter. I hurt my elbow recently, and picked up a PSE Brute NXT 70# peak, have it sitting at 42# and blasting Xs on 5 spots all day long. Also a neat feature is I can take that bow apart with no press, making it easy to work on from home or in the field, and not having to rely on having a press around, even though I have access to one at work.
 

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Problem isn’t pulling easy or even 70, it’s the 30th pull that will get you if you can get there. Say if you did an indoor shoot for fun.

many drop poundage for this reason. Getting to 50 shots while practicing is rough.

my workout is 10 shots 50-40-30-20 and then some walking away and turn and shoot. For hunting season. When I start I’m done quick when the bows cranked up all the way. But I’m back in shape soon.

tune time will also get ya good.
 
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