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I've been playing around with my bow setup recently and have noticed that with a quiver, 10 inch stabilizer and sight attached I get a lot of torque issues. Recently I started shooting without the stabilizer and only the top portion of the two piece quiver on and noticed that my torque issues have almost gone away, is this normal? Do I really need a stabilizer? The only time I've noticed it making a big difference is when it's windy outside, and even then the difference is marginal. Just curious if anyone else shoots without one or with a small offset one like j-daddy had set up on his old vector turbo.
 

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What I need when I'm practicing in perfect conditions during a relaxing afternoon is very different from what I need in a hunting situation.
 

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Former Wyoming Boy
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The stabilizer doesn't reduce hand torque. It's primary function is to steady the bow at full draw by adding mass weight.
The bow becomes even more steady when you get the weight out away from the bow, toward the end of the stabilizer... kind of the same principle as the long pole a tight-rope walker uses.
The 2nd function it has is... forcing the bow to react to the shot the same way every time. To fall dead away, instead of twisting at the release.
The third... some are made to absorb noise. Most people use these kind for hunting... including me.
The torque you're getting is probably caused by having things attached to the side of your bow.
The only way to fight it is to take that quiver off or use a V bar with more weight on the opposite side to counteract the quiver.
On some bows, even the mounting brackets for your sight and rest are enough to tilt the bow to that side at full draw.
I use a hip quiver for just this reason.
 

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Good point. When your shaking from adrenalin, you'll want that stabilizer. Try taking a jog then shoot your bow with and without.
 

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I shot with out one and shot good. I could shoot a 6 inch group at 80 yards all day. I through a 10in dish hunter and it cut my groups in half.
 

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I've been playing around with my bow setup recently and have noticed that with a quiver, 10 inch stabilizer and sight attached I get a lot of torque issues. Recently I started shooting without the stabilizer and only the top portion of the two piece quiver on and noticed that my torque issues have almost gone away, is this normal? Do I really need a stabilizer? The only time I've noticed it making a big difference is when it's windy outside, and even then the difference is marginal. Just curious if anyone else shoots without one or with a small offset one like j-daddy had set up on his old vector turbo.
You can find 2" or 3" stabilizers.
 

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I have none on my two compounds but they are so perfectly balanced that I dont need one.
None on my sticks either.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I727 using Tapatalk 2
 

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I find a stabilizer very helpful when the wind is blowing perpendicular to the riser. With a heavier stabilizer, I think it's easier to hold the bow still.
 

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In 40 years of bowhunting I've never hunted with a stabilizer. I tried them for brief moments target practicing & saw nothing more than added weight, I guess I don't see the need. Extra wt. with little gain.

ElkNut1
 

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Do you see any target shooters shooting without one?

With that being said no one wants to haul a 10 pound bow in the back country or have a 16" stab sticking out in front of your bow.

A heavy bow is an accurate bow, no different than a target rifle.

The key is finding a happy medium.

A bow that is accurate and functional.

I go with an 8" stab and 11oz weight on my elk rig.

As mentioned above a stab will most certainly help with wind.

If you can shoot accurately in real world hunting condition without one then go without.

An offset bracket with stab will help reduce the weight of a quiver.
 

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I shoot with a 10" and 4oz wt. It seems to work really well. However after seeing Randy Ulmer shoot 100 yards without a stab I am thinking about trying it.
 

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Former Wyoming Boy
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My Z7 is the first bow I've owned in a long time that didn't want to lean to the right at full draw.
It also naturally wants to stay upright after the shot... must be the reflex riser. Anyway, no real need for a long stabilizer.
It would probably shoot better with a long one, haven't tried it... but I don't want the added weight.
My 70 and 80 yard groups tell me I don't need it for hunting. I do use a 3" S-coil just to soak up noise.
 

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Corripe Cervisiam
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No stabilizer for me. I suppose if I was shooting for$$$ at high level tourneys I would use one to eke out a few extra points. I'm honing my shooting for hunts, and the less crap I have hanging off my bow, the better. Sure form flaws show up more without a stabilizer and shooting recurves and longbows exaggerate flaws even more.

Form is always a work in progress with me and I try to solve it without gadgets, to each his own, no right or wrong answer.
 

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My Elk Hunting Home
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I know I can shoot without a stabilizer, but I also know that I haven't found a bow that I shoot better without a stabilizer. So I'll always have one on my bow for hunting. I do however downsize for hunting. I use the 12" B-stinger with 14oz weight for 3D and such, then switch to my 5" Doinker for hunting. That alone is a huge switch. I can't stand the feel of the bow without any stabilizer.

Run a couple hundred yards and then try shooting that bow without a stabilizer. I've tried......those small oscillations of the pin around your aimpoint become oscillations that cover the entire elk. If I released an arrow at that point, I'd have no idea where the arrow was going.
 
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