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i am thinking of switching to carbon -- hate to do it, but getting more difficult to find time with a 1 1/2 year old at home.

you guys who switched to carbon from wood or alum. what do you think? I always worry about getting feathers to stick to carbon. Do the shafts get too light? I am only shooting around 50lbs or so on my recurve.

thanks in advance for your thoughts.
 

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I am shooting cedar and carbon shafts.

Carbon has certain advantages:
- all shafts are exactly the same in spine and weight
- a carbon shaft is always straight and will stay so
- a carbon shaft lasts way longer as long as you don't shoot a robin hood:confused:
- carbon is lighter then cedar, so your speed increases
- easy to change tips/broadheads due to the screw-insert.

Don't worry about the weight, there are plenty of choises in weight to be sure you don't get under the 8 grains/lbs for your bow.

I have very good experiences with Goldtip Traditionals. They are virtually indestructable, fly superb and I like the wood-grain.

For fletching I use the same as on my cedar shafts: Saunders Fletchtite. The fletches hold forever.
 

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LOVE carbon.

Don't get me wrong, I go through plenty of wood arrows out rabbit hunting and pine cone shooting but carbon was easy to tune for me. I use cap wraps and super glue gel or fletch tape and have no problems with fletching them buggers. Once you get them tuned you will NOT be sorry.
 

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Carbon all the way. I actually think that for my style of shooting they work much better. It could be my perception but the reduced arc helps with my point of aim. I keep my shots at 20 and under.
 

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i am thinking of switching to carbon -- hate to do it, but getting more difficult to find time with a 1 1/2 year old at home.

you guys who switched to carbon from wood or alum. what do you think? I always worry about getting feathers to stick to carbon. Do the shafts get too light? I am only shooting around 50lbs or so on my recurve.

thanks in advance for your thoughts.
I loooooove carbon!

I'm not much of a traditionalist or a sticklar to shooting certain types of shafts with certain types of bows. I have even shot carbon out of my primitive bows :mg::wink: but if I had to pick an arrow shaft for my primitive bows to shoot...it would most likely be rivercane.

IMO...skinny carbon arrows are the best arrows in the world for my applications...when it comes to consistantcy, durability, accuracy and penetrating potential....especially after they are footed with a small piece of an aluminum arrow. Talk about the perfect bunny or big game arrow ;)

Just about any arrow placed in the right spot is still a bullseye and can still kill a deer...but I just like carbon for those slight advantages mentioned above.

Ultimately....shoot what you want and if you want to get the most out of your equipment...just tune whatever arrow type you end up using to the best of your ability.

Ray ;)
 

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I don't see much difference between the nocks I use for my cedar and the ones I use for my carbons. And they both fit my string well.
 

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I've spent the last two years trying to get carbons to tune in my bow, they will not. I'm on the edge of going back to wood arrows.

The disadvantages I've experienced with carbon..

#1.. Carbons are NOT the spine the manufacturer say they are.. I wasted alot of money getting an arrow that was close to the spine I wanted.. Someone should sue them for false advertisement.

#2. Once I found an arrow it shot very well unless there was a cross-wind, then it turned to crap.

#3.. I'm a Bowhunter, very particular about my arrow flight/performance. For me, after two years of experimenting, wood beats them plus I don't have too worry about eating carbon fibers in my venison.


I know I'm in the minority but just so you know they don't work well for everybody.

woodbow
 

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Im with Dutchman. I use GT 3555 carbons all this year shooting 3-D. They are tough & reliable. Great Arrow! I will be shooting them in my first ASA shoot in Paris TX this coming spring.
 

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Carbon and tuning.... there is a defentily a catch. In the beginning it drove me crazy too, till I found out how it worked! You would expect a shaft of 35-55 lbs to have a spine somewhere between 35 and 55 wright? Well, it isnt! A 35-55 shaft is actually 63 lbs!

A closer look at the shaft learns us that there is another figure on: 0.500. This is the bending of the shaft at 1 lbs at 26 inches. In other words: a common spine-measurement. If we want to translate this in our trusted AMO spinevalues, we have the divide 26" trough this bending and multiply it with the constance for carbon, being 1,2115.

Here you find an overview of the most common values:

15-35 = 0.600” becomes: 26/0,6 x 1,2115 = 52,5 lbs
35-55 = 0.500” becomes: 26/0,5 x 1,2115 = 63 lbs
55-75 = 0.400” becomes: 26/0,4 x 1,2115 = 78 lbs
75-95 = 0.300” becomes: 26/0,3 x 1,2115 = 105 lbs

If you don't believe me, put them on the spine-tester....

I will tell you what went wrong with me, I can imagine the same happened with Woodbow: My bow has a calculated dynamic spine of 53 lbs. So I thought I had to use a GT 35-55 carbon shaft. However, whatever I tried, I could't get it properly tuned. It drove me crazy. Now I know I was way overspined, because this shaft actually delivers 63 lbs!
Later on I tried a 15-35 and with a standard insert and 100 grains fieldtip on it, and a length of 30 " it flew close to perfect. I couldn't believe it. Now I know this makes perfect sence, because 15-35 actually delivers 52.5 lbs, being very close to my dynamic spine of 53!

Carbon is also very sensitive for shortening or adding weight to the end. This will change your dynamic spine drastically: the shaft stiffens very easy in this way! But once found the proper tuning, they will fly fantastic. (But not with so much grace as cedar though....)
 

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The GT 35-55 GREEN shaft was the closest thing that I found to the proper spine.. Then I made the mistake of purchasing some 35-55 Trads. and the problems magnified. It wasn't until I got them on the spine tester that I found out the Trads are 10-12# stiffer than the green shafts.. I did not try the 15-35 cause I was becoming weary of wasting money and I don't see them listed by most dealers I buy from..

They say 70# spine.. actually 89# the 45-60's....85# GT 35-55 green..58#
GT 35-55 Trads.. 71#

I put 250-300 grains of tip weight trying to weaken the spine, which I didn't mind because they were too light for my taste anyway.. I got them shoot pretty good until they got in a cross wind...

they work for lots of people maybe they will work for you to..

woodbow
 

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I really like my carbons, I went form POC to Carbons a little over a year ago and a couple things happened.

1) my groupings went from ~4-5" down to ~2" due to consistentcy. A combination of truly straight, consistent spine, weight, etc...
2) arrows stopped being "consumables", w/POC I would normally destroy at least one arrow per session if I was shooting 3D, if god help me I was stumping it was more like 3-4. shooting 2x per week, that adds up to a couple dozen arrows and $$$$. With carbons, I still have 9 of the 24 I bought.

are they worth it financially, well yes... they really don't cost that much more and at least I have never had to toss out a carbon arrow because it just didn't fly well.

are they worth it for shooting, well yes... better consistency yeilds better shooting, which leads to more confidence in yourself and still better shooting, better shooting puts more meat on the table.

are they worth it if you are a true traditionalist... well if you are a true hard core traditionalist you would be making your own bows, planing your own arrows, and plucking your own turkeys and you would never dream of something like carbon.

tuning is not the easiest thing though, you can't simply read the spine #'s on the shafts, but then this topic has been well discussed. Find someone to watch for you and open minded, just because it "should" work doesn't mean it will. There are a ton of tricks, brass inserts, big heavy points, full length weight tubes, 3 or 4 fletch, even tightening or loosing your nock can have big effects.
 

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The GT 35-55 GREEN shaft was the closest thing that I found to the proper spine.. Then I made the mistake of purchasing some 35-55 Trads. and the problems magnified. It wasn't until I got them on the spine tester that I found out the Trads are 10-12# stiffer than the green shafts.. I did not try the 15-35 cause I was becoming weary of wasting money and I don't see them listed by most dealers I buy from..

They say 70# spine.. actually 89# the 45-60's....85# GT 35-55 green..58#
GT 35-55 Trads.. 71#

I put 250-300 grains of tip weight trying to weaken the spine, which I didn't mind because they were too light for my taste anyway.. I got them shoot pretty good until they got in a cross wind...

they work for lots of people maybe they will work for you to..

woodbow
That is very strange and I don't understand that...
.300", .400".500", and .600" can each have one spine value only, no matter what arrow it is. I thought I was really on with my calculations.


Yesterday I put two different Goldtip Traditionals in the spine-tester:

GT 15-35 (."600"): 51 #
GT 55-75 (.400"): 76 #

So they were both as they should be, even a little bit weaker, but that might have been the tester itself... I didn't measure the 35-55 though....
 

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Wood? eeoowwghh!

Just kidding.

I don't shoot them though.
I use the same GT 5575 shafts that I use for my compounds, just cut a little longer.
125gr head, 100gr insert, total weight 490gr for a 50lb recurve.
I will admit I am not the greatest trad shooter in the world, but these seem to shoot and fly very well.
Haven't broken/lost one yet.

Kev
 

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I shoot all three; wood, carbon, and alluminum.

I shoot woods primaraly out of my wood bows, carbons from my target rig, and alluminum are my stumpers.

Having said that I have been experimenting with my carbons in my wood bows. I must say, I LIKE IT!!!! All my bows that I currently shoot are 40#ers, so I knew they would match, but WOW talk about consistancy! I am seriouslly thinking about buying a set of carbons for my wood bows. Fortunatly I know what to get as in spine/weight, since my bows all pul the same #age. I am currently shooting Full length G.T. Entrada Ultralights with 120gn up front.

If you wanna try carbons, try one in a .400 spine with 150gn up front, full length....that should get you in the ball park.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I have heard that carbons were rough on the arrow rests due to the rough surface of carbons. I shoot off the shelf, but really do not want to be repalcing the carpet every month or so because of wear. Has anyone found this to be a problem/ have the Manuf. figured a way to smooth out the finish?

sorry for all the questions, but with the price on carbons i am trying to figure out if they will take up less time and/ormake my shooting any better or just more expensive.
 
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