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Why are many new hunting bows designed without yokes?

2218 Views 22 Replies 17 Participants Last post by  dk_ace1
This may be a stupid question but...

What is the advantage of the yoke-less designs that are so popular? Seems like yokes in hunting bows are very much the minority...

Yokes seem so much easier to tune why get away from them? Is it because manufacturers are trying to improve their draw cycle? I can’t imagine there isn’t a strong reason for the engineers to phase them out.
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Can’t include Elite and Bowtech as they have systems superior to yokes.
Not trying to say you’re wrong, but why are they superior? Does the ability to move the cams or shift the limb pocket produce a better tune more easily?

Would love to hear from guys who tune bows for a living.

back to my original question was there a “problem” with yokes modern designs are trying to fix?
 

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I never liked yokes. Mathews used them to make it possible to tune their bows. I had a SB I shot for years that did well with yoke tuning, but it was always a band-aid. To really tune that bow you needed to get the cam rotation and ATA perfect, and that just never lasted long and was a real pain to execute - so I lazied out and went to the yokes. They just seem like engineering mulligans that make up for finicky bows.
 

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I loved yokes but once you shim a bow,which takes a little more work at first, you never have to shim it again. Just change strings and should be very close to being right maybe a little rest adjustment. Everytime I changed a yoked bow had to adjust yokes.


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Yokes are an easy solution until you change strings. Shims, tophats, and the setups elite and bowtech uses are permanent solutions unless your make a change to the arrows or bow poundage.

Plus the bow looks cleaner without yokes.
 

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Yokes are an easy solution until you change strings. Shims, tophats, and the setups elite and bowtech uses are permanent solutions unless your make a change to the arrows or bow poundage.

Plus the bow looks cleaner without yokes.
Lol mark the cam starting position with a sharpie... done. Seem a lot easier than changing whatever a “top hat” is
 

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I have been one to prefer yokes over anything. I seem to always lean toward Hoyt offerings but its about how they shoot, not how they tune. That said, I just tuned up an Elite Rezult with S.E.T. limb pockets and that system is amazing. Ive heard the bowtech system is just as easy and works as well as Elites. These offerings are what the bow market has much needed and truly is a game changer. SVX cams require yokes so I am a yoke guy.

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Lol mark the cam starting position with a sharpie... done. Seem a lot easier than changing whatever a “top hat” is
Yoke tuning adjusts the cam lean, pretty hard to make a mark for that reference.
The tophats are a one piece shim system that Matthews uses. They fit inside the limb and the axle goes through them. Takes a couple minutes to swap them out.
 

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This may be a stupid question but...

What is the advantage of the yoke-less designs that are so popular? Seems like yokes in hunting bows are very much the minority...

Yokes seem so much easier to tune why get away from them? Is it because manufacturers are trying to improve their draw cycle? I can’t imagine there isn’t a strong reason for the engineers to phase them out.
Yokes only work on cam systems that attach one end of the cable, to the ends of the axle.
These would be Dual cam, Single cam, Hybrid cam, and Bowtech's Overdrive Binary cam.

The most popular cam system currently, is the Binary cam.
And with that cam system, the end of the cable that would attach to the axle, has to attach to a reverse track (or tracks) on the opposite cam.
 

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Not dinging any shops, but many have no clue how to tune yokes or time or charge$$. Which means it’s becoming a home job.

pressless bow tune Systems make it simple. And 4 trac bows just about eliminate the need.
 

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Not trying to say you’re wrong, but why are they superior? Does the ability to move the cams or shift the limb pocket produce a better tune more easily?

Would love to hear from guys who tune bows for a living.

back to my original question was there a “problem” with yokes modern designs are trying to fix?
The biggest advantage is to be able to fine tune without a press. When I bareshaft tune I’m outside behind my shop. I have to come back up the hill and put in the press each time I add or take away a twist in the yoke. With the two new systems all you need is an Allen key.

I also think there’s more that can go wrong with yokes, string stretch, more to catch on twigs etc and I also think they produce more noise.
 

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As stated above, yokes aren't necessarily as convenient as shimming a binary can because you still need a it's to relax the rigging. Since most companies have made the switch to split limbs, there aren't any tricks that name a press less-necessary.

APA still uses true dual cams (independent of each other) with dual yokes. They also continue to use solid limbs so you can actually grab the opposite cable, press on the yoke leg opposite the one your want to twist, and relax the other yoke enough to remove it and twist/untwist.

The ability to make adjustments by turning screws ala SET Tech or Deadlock is much more convenient and potentially more precise than twisting cables. Once you get down to a half twist on one yoke leg, your down to micro-adjusting your rest to make up the difference.

Cam sync still requires a press, though, so once they figure out how to adjust that (which Bowtech had a micro-sync built into the cams in their BTX bows a few years ago), then it's all baby-steps.

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Not trying to say you’re wrong, but why are they superior? Does the ability to move the cams or shift the limb pocket produce a better tune more easily?

Would love to hear from guys who tune bows for a living.

back to my original question was there a “problem” with yokes modern designs are trying to fix?
I definitely makes it easier.

I'll use my tuning my RX4 ultra vs revolt X bare shaft tuning out to 35 yards as an example. Both bows set with perfect center shot. Both throw a tail left.

Rx4 - put half a twist in the left and take out half from the right. Shoot again and almost perfect. Add/subtract another half twist and now its slight tail right so I move my rest a 1/16 or less and it perfect. All this done by running back and forth from my bow press, but bow shoots light out.

Revolt X - Use a hex key and move the top and bottom cams to the left. Quarter turn both cams. Now its tail right slightly. Move both cams back right 1/8th turn now perfect bare shaft and ive been standing in the same spot the whole time and haven't touched my rest.

Both systems work but as a tuning tool the press-less tuning method is superior.
 

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I definitely makes it easier.

I'll use my tuning my RX4 ultra vs revolt X bare shaft tuning out to 35 yards as an example. Both bows set with perfect center shot. Both throw a tail left.

Rx4 - put half a twist in the left and take out half from the right. Shoot again and almost perfect. Add/subtract another half twist and now its slight tail right so I move my rest a 1/16 or less and it perfect. All this done by running back and forth from my bow press, but bow shoots light out.

Revolt X - Use a hex key and move the top and bottom cams to the left. Quarter turn both cams. Now its tail right slightly. Move both cams back right 1/8th turn now perfect bare shaft and ive been standing in the same spot the whole time and haven't touched my rest.

Both systems work but as a tuning tool the press-less tuning method is superior.
Well said.

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Yoke tuning adjusts the cam lean, pretty hard to make a mark for that reference.
The tophats are a one piece shim system that Matthews uses. They fit inside the limb and the axle goes through them. Takes a couple minutes to swap them out.
yoke cables affect both cam lean and starting position. Both are measurable with a tape measure. Super easy.
 

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Not trying to say you’re wrong, but why are they superior? Does the ability to move the cams or shift the limb pocket produce a better tune more easily?

Would love to hear from guys who tune bows for a living.

back to my original question was there a “problem” with yokes modern designs are trying to fix?
You don't need a bow press to tune a Bowtech Revolt X, Mathews and Hoyt you need to use a bow press
 

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On a hoyt top cam leans right at rest. At full draw leans left. So cam needs To "wobble" when pulling cable. Me not knowing much would say that compromises accuracy. System like mathews top hats, cams sit always straigh and pull directly vertical. Sounds much better To me.
 
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