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I have been shooting a scott rhino for several years and now the silverhorn and I just recently started shooting with a carter evolution+ four finger. With the silverhorn my 28.5" draw felt pretty much right on but with the evolution it feels way to short. It feels like I am having to bend my arm way to much with the evolution, it feels like that when I get to full draw that I'm not actually at full draw and I need to go a little further but I can't. I am seriously considering putting the 29" mods on my 82nd next week to see if that helps. Does anyone else have this problem when going to a handheld release or is it just me?
 

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I have been shooting a scott rhino for several years and now the silverhorn and I just recently started shooting with a carter evolution+ four finger. With the silverhorn my 28.5" draw felt pretty much right on but with the evolution it feels way to short. It feels like I am having to bend my arm way to much with the evolution, it feels like that when I get to full draw that I'm not actually at full draw and I need to go a little further but I can't. I am seriously considering putting the 29" mods on my 82nd next week to see if that helps. Does anyone else have this problem when going to a handheld release or is it just me?

Please post up a picture.

Wrist strap release anchor position
is going to be very different
than
a handle release anchor position.


Not a good idea to go by "feel"
to figure out if the nock is at the correct spot on your face.

The DL setting of the bow
really only positions the nock on your face.



With the wrist strap,
you can set the wrist strap to trigger length really long,
if you are a fan of the super stretched out trigger finger.

Nock is in the same spot on your face,
but the wrist strap to trigger length
adjustment, only moves your knuckles
further back on your face
or further forward on your face.


When you play with the wrist strap to trigger length adjustment,
you also play with how far away your elbow
is located, away from the bow riser.



With a handle release,
the handle is one size. Can adjust the knuckle to hook length
on the handle release, because it's all metal.



Just remember,
shorter is usually better
when using the Evo release.

With no picture,
don't know if you have your palm facing the floor
(hand horizontal...pinky knuckle at 3-o'clock)

or

if you have the back of your hand against your cheek
(hand vertical...pinky knuckle at 12-o'clock)

or

if you have the back of your hand somewhere in-between.



You may need to play with the peep sight position.

Most folks have the peep sight too low.

As you move the peep sight a skosh higher,
then the nock moves a skosh lower on your face.

When the nock moves a skosh lower on your face
then the wrist also has to move a skosh lower on your face.


Wrist a skosh lower on your face
will help to get the wrist a skosh lower than your elbow as well,
at full draw.

If the wrist is a skosh lower on than the elbow
when you are at full draw,
then you will have an easier time to pull your elbow
straight back and "pull through the shot".


Just relax the wrist.
Flatten out the back of the hand.
Don't squeeze your bicep muscles (upper arm muscles).

Use your back muscles, the shoulder blade muscles
(same ones for rowing a boat)....

If I have my hand on your elbow,
then push my hand straight back
with your elbow.

Keep the tension even on all the fingers.


I have a 3 finger Evo release,
and I just use the index and middle finger (2-finger hold).


Evo handle is very sensitive to vertical angle.

If the first time you pull,
you have more tension on the 2nd finger
and
if the second time you pull,
you have more tension on the 3rd finger...

you have changed the vertical angle of the release...

first time, top of release (near pinky finger)
was closer to the riser...you will need one amount of tension to fire


second time,
top of release (near pinky finger)
was farther away from the riser...you will need a different amount of tension to fire the release...


the Evo is going to show you VERY CLEARLY
if you do anything different.


If you grip the handle with a tight fist for one shot
and
if you grip the handle with a loose fist for the 2nd shot
and
if you grip the handle with the tips of your fingers for the 3rd shot....

the release will fire at 3 different amounts of tension
(you may even run out of air, because one of those shots will take a loooong time)



so,
folks will say the release sticks
or
the release is not firing at the same amount of pressure
or
the release fires quick on one shot
and the release fires sloooow on the next shot....


well,
find a grip on the handle
(number of fingers, and a position for the handle on your fingers, as in loose grip or tight fist grip and you must reproduce this grip the same way for each shot)

(and find the same relaxed wrist, to keep the handle angle the same)

and the Evo release will be very consistent.
 

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I watched a hunting show on TV the other day and this guy had the nock back near his ear. I had to take a second look at it, couldn't believe his anchor was so far back. I use a kisser button and touch the string with my nose so that every time I reach full draw I will be consistant. Works for me and it establishes the correct anchor point in the draw cycle!
 

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Can't really add much to Nutts & Bolts excellent answer except... most people have their wrist strap release adjusted long. When they go to a hand held release they have in effect lengthened their comparative draw length. I.É. their hand is further away from the riser with the wrist strap than with the hand held release. Just remember, better an inch too short than 1/4" too long. Especially with the Evo.

After years (25) of a wrist strap I've switched to an Evo for 90% of the time & a Carter Target 3 for 3D and maybe hunting. I'm not there yet but I can already see an increase in consistency. Good luck, be patient. It will seem hopeless at times, but the end result will make you a much better shot!

hd
 
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