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Discussion Starter #1
I am not new to archery but am new to the world of traditional archery. My question is I love the look of cedar shafts and that is what I want to shoot but I have a feeling with a recurve I will be running around shooting at more cactus and stumps than normal. So will cedar arrows hold up or do you think I need to stick to aluminum or carbon?
 

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I like both Wood and Carbon and have broke some of each. I do think Carbon will take more punishment. I like the Gold Tip Traditionals and Blackhawk Carbonwoods.
 

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I have long enjoyed owning, making and shooting wooden arrows. I generally save my best cedars for events or a special hunt; other wooden arrows I shoot are mostly to try out different materials. It is my opinion that gaining experience in hand-straightening aluminums, first, would best serve those who are interested in shooting woods. And between the two, for someone new to traditional, your first aluminums should outlast your first woods. Enjoy. Rick.
 

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I tend to agree, on less than 50# bows you will be fine with woodies. I shoot only sitka spruce and we stump shoot almost all winter long with no issues at all on 46# bows...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Another question. What tool do you use to get the points on? I know I need to taper to put the knocks on but can't find info on how to put glue on points and broadheads.
 

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I melt Ferrule-Tite over an open flame, apply to taper, and press the point into a piece of wood for a few seconds to prevent it from backing off. With broadheads it is common to reheat and adjust alignment until the arrow spins true. Rick.
 

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I do as well. Hotmelt is the best glue you can use. One important thing, you have to clean the point first to get all the oil out of them before gluing or nothing will stick! There are a few inexpensive taper tools you can buy to do the nock and point ends. I use a motor driven one called a woodchuck, but I build around 100 dozen arrows a year. You can get decent hand tools for $6 - $25.
 

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He hit that one on the head. Sitka Sruce is a tough wood, and I have abused the hell out of them before they broke. My experience with them is they fly a little higher than my POC.

I tend to agree, on less than 50# bows you will be fine with woodies. I shoot only sitka spruce and we stump shoot almost all winter long with no issues at all on 46# bows...
 

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Not the same…similarly. Nock taper is 11 degrees, point taper is 5 degrees. Nocks are placed at 90 degrees to direction of grain of the wood.
 

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Not the same…similarly. Nock taper is 11 degrees, point taper is 5 degrees. Nocks are placed at 90 degrees to direction of grain of the wood.
Always a good idea to mark the nock direction on the shaft prior to tapering.
 

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I shoot an asiatic recurve and prefer bamboo or woodies,have been using poplar,yellowpine,maple,douglas fir and find the douglas fir very durable as well as the yellow pine.
 
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